Frances Fitzgerald Elmes

F, #10201, b. 23 Apr 1867, d. 13 Feb 1919
Frances Fitzgerald Fawkner
from The Herald, 13 May 1919, p4
Father*Dr Thomas Elmes b. 1837, d. 8 Dec 1893
Mother*Sarah Bamford Turner b. c May 1837, d. 26 Feb 1927
ChartsDescendants of William A'BECKETT
Descendants of Rev John ELMES
Note* Ethel Beatrice Ysobel Chomley Ethel Beatrice Ysobel Chomley and Frances Fitzgerald Elmes were close friends. 
xref-link*Index to Frances Fitzgerald Elmes' writings
Birth*23 Apr 1867 Taunton, Somerset, England, Jun Q [Taunton] 5c 4249.1 
Birth-Notice*1 May 1867April 23, at Bishop's Lydeard, the wife of Mr Thomas Elmes, M.D., of a daughter.2 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel8 Sep 1868 Sailing with Dr Thomas Elmes Sarah Bamford Elmes to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Antiope sailing from Liverpool. Dr Elmes was ship's surgeon. Arrived on 19 November.
Age 6 [sic] travelling as saloon passenger.3
Article*15 Oct 1892The article reads: PERCY WIMBURN. (By F. S. F.)
"Can you keep a secret ?
I hope you really can"
—Nursery Rhyme.
He came as junior clerk to the one bank in the township of Bungabong; a fair, delicate lad, with a simple but citified manner. He was young, barely twenty-one, and his knowledge of the world was, till he came up here, distinctly small. He bad been carefully brought up, and his manners were nice. His former companions had probably been ordinary, commonplace lads, brainless, perhaps, but honest and gentlemanly. He would have got on better at Bungabong had he let various things alone.4 
Note*bt 1895 - 1917 Frances Fitzgerald (birth name: Frances Elmes) (a.k.a. Frances Fitzgerald Elmes; Big Fran; Frances Fawkner; F. F. Elmes) Also writes as: Mars ; A. Leo Watts ; S. O. S; F. F. Born: 23 Apr 1867 Somerset, England ; Died: 1919 London, England
Expatriate Departed from Australia: 1905
Frances Fitzgerald Elmes, the daughter of a medical practitioner, spent her childhood in Berwick, Vic. She worked as a journalist in Melbourne in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. An early feminist, she was the author of the performed, but unpublished, play 'The New Woman' [189-?] and of The Melbourne Cookery Book [190-?]. She went to London in 1905 and worked as a journalist on Charles Chomley's (q.v.) British Australasian. Her relationship with Chomley was depicted in a fictional guise by Chomley's nephew Martin Boyd (q.v.) in his Langton novels.
Frances Fitzgerald Elmes died in London in 1919, a victim of the influenza epidemic.5 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelJul 1902 To Sydney, Australia. Ship Australia sailing to Sydney?
Age 31 - travelling as Miss Fitzgerald.6 
Article8 Apr 1905The article reads: DREAMS AND THEIR PORTENTS.
Two stories of curious dreams which he thinks should interest the Psychical Research Society are related by the London correspondent of The Manchester Guardian.
The first concerns a novelist and a well-known London stage manager, who have been for long close friends. The former dreamed that the latter came to him with his neck bandaged and an expression of extreme agony on his face. He pointed to his bandaged neck, and tried to speak, but failed. Then the author woke up, and, strongly impressed by the vividness of his dream, related it in the morning to his brother, saying. "It gave the impression that S— had been hanged." During the morning he telephoned to his friend's house, and was told that he had been in bed for two days', and was seriously ill through an accident. He hurried off to see him, and on entering his bedroom found S— sitting up in bed with his neck
swathed in bandages. It appeared that during a rehearsal he had strained his neck, and had been in great pain ever since. This was striking enough, but there was more to come; for afterwards he said to S—'s wife, "You know I hurried round because I had a dream that had been hanged." "That's most extraordinary," was the reply, "because the doctor
said he had very nearly dislocated his neck in exactly the same manner that occurs when people are hanged.
The other story is more striking still. A lady living in London recently engaged a man and his wife as housekeeper and butler. She engaged them without having seen the man, as he was in temporary work in the country, but she was so satisfied with the characters produced and the woman's appearance that she decided to take the risk. A few nights after the housekeeper had taken up her duties the lady dreamed that she was lying awake in her bed and saw a man at her dressing table with her jewel case open before him, picking the stones out of their settings with a small instrument. He turned his face several times towards the bed, and laughed to himself. She woke up and tried to dismiss the recollection of the dream from her mind, but the impression of the man's face was so vivid that it
haunted her through the day. The next night she dreamed exactly the same dream. On the afternoon following she was relating the matter to a caller, when the housekeeper entered and said her husband had arrived, and would she care to see him. Apologizing to her guest for the interruption the lady said he could come up. The man entered the room, his new mistress looked at him, and gave a loud exclamation, for it was, I need hardly say, the man of the dream. Curiously enough, the lady has absolutely refused to dismiss the man, because she is a sceptic in such matters, and if anything is to happen, she says, she would like to see it through. She now
sleeps with a telephone at her bedside, and has locked up every jewel in a safe. Her friends are eagerly awaiting the sequel.7 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel19 Jul 1905 To London, England. Ship Afric sailing from Melbourne
Miss Frances Elmes (Age 37) journalist.8 
Publication*1906Frances Fitzgerald Elmes published: The Melbourne cookery book : compiled especially with the view of assisting the housewife in the cottage and villa home who must carefully study ways and means / by F. F. Elmes.
Description: xiii, 160 p; 18 cm.
Phone 03 8664 7009 to arrange delivery from Rare Books SLV RARELT 641.5 EL6M. 
Publication14 Jan 1911She published: THE DESERT. By F. F. Elmes, in the "British Australasian."
The desert was sad. It was alone, al ways alone, and the few travellers who hurried across it hated it; and called it horrible and cruel. If now and again a tender plant pushed its head through the sand, and saw to what a land it had come, it shrivelled away sadly and died. And when sometimes a traveller was lost in the desert he spent his strength for weary days and nights in seeking the way out, until at last he sank down, never to rise up again. Then the crows would come. The crows were not afraid of the desert, be cause, flying high into the air, they could see the far-off tree tops where they lived. But they never stayed on the plains; noth ing ever stayed except the bones of dead things that lay white and gleaming in the sun. Even he did not love the desert; he liked to shine, not upon stunted scrub and sparse prickly herbs, but on flowers and grass, on running creeks and rivers. He complained that the desert killed every thing, and that if he persuaded any green thing to show its head it only pined away and died. Sometimes a fierce north wind came and sported with the desert, tearing up the sand in great clouds, twisting it into a whirling column, and dancing madly with it across the waste. At such times the desert felt a fierce happiness; then only had it a chance of movement and change. It went mad with the north wind; the two in their play were very terrible, and the unfortunate who happened to come in the way of their awful sports was never again seen alive. Perhaps long afterwards an-other wild game might sweep off the sand that covered the whitened bones. And then one day men came to the desert, bringing with them horses and carts loaded with tents, and water tanks, and food, and tools. The crows, flying high above, had seen these things before, and they knew that their days of fatness on the sandy plains were over; but when the desert asked them what it meant they only croaked and flew away. Then the men began digging trenches. The north wind arose and blew its hardest; but the men waited behind a shelter that they had built till it was all over, and then they cleaned the trenches of the sand blown into them, deepening them and widening them till they were like river channels. Day after day the work went on, until the face of the desert was scarred and criss-crossed with trenches of all sizes, from wide canals to narrow ditches. The desert grew used to the new state of things, to the digging and carting, to the neighing of horses, to the long evenings—not silent now, but alive with laughter and song. The desert began to feel happy, be lieving that at last men loved it, and had come to dwell on its expanse. Then one morning work ceased; tents and tools were packed upon the carts, the horses were harnessed, and many of the men departed. But a few remained, waiting idly for hours, seemingly in expectation of some great event. At last it happened, and there was much joy among the onlookers. Down the main channel came slowly a brown, crawling thing. It had no head, no tail; it never ended. Slowly it crept over the hard baked bottom of the trenches, soaking their banks, flowing from the great canals on and on into, the narrow ditches, filling them, and making little swirling noises. Here and there small clods of earth fell with, a splash and disappeared. Gradually all the trenches were filled to overflowing. When night fell the men went away, and the desert was left alive with the creeping thing that lay cold and still on its bosom. The moon rose, and looked down on a second moon which showed dimly on the surface of the brown thing, and the desert was full of wonder and fear. Very falteringly it spoke to the moon, and said: "Always we have been alone at nights, you and I, and you found all the little hollows and made them black, and the great stretches you turned to silver, and now this unknown creature has come to warm itself in my very heart, and you bend over and caress it as you used to caress me, and you bring another moon not to me, but to be a companion to this ter rible brown thing." The moon made no answer, for it could not explain what water was to one who did not even know its name. Sometimes vagrant showers had swept over the desert, but these had been so light and passing that they had merely tickled the great sandy surface, and had never been sufficient to wet the soil. All night the desert, was afraid. Then the dawn came, and a crimson sky blazed in the east. A soft little south wind swept over the water, blowing it into tiny ripples.
"What is it? Oh, tell me?" cried the desert. The south wind was silent. How could he, though he knew rivers and lakes, the wide sea, soft showers and tropical cloud bursts, explain what water was to one who knew nothing of such things.
"What is it?" repeated the desert. "It is water," answered the south wind. "With the help of the sun it will grow corn and grass and trees on your bosom." "l do not understand," said the desert. "You must be patient, then, and you will see," said the south wind. "But all is for your happiness." By and by men came and turned over the earth with the help of horses and machines having blades that cut and tore, and after wards they scattered seed on the land. Houses were set up, and to them came women and children, the first that the desert had ever seen. Each day brought change and unrest. The old days were gone for ever, and the desert fretted for them. Its surface then was clear and wide. Now it was broken and crossed everywhere by trenches. Raw new earth and raw new houses had taken the place of the endless scrub and sand. Then one soft spring morning the desert woke to the greatest wonder of all. Every where across the brown earth there showed a faint mist of green, and everywhere the earth was pricking with the myriads of grass and wheat blades that were forcing themselves upwards. Then it realised the purpose of all the trouble and toil. It was of this change that the sun and the south wind had spoken. Green things were grow ing in the desert—no longer barren, but transformed into a wide, fruitful plain. Each day the wonder grew. Small fruit trees burst into a wealth of blossom. Cherry trees, all white. Quince, white tinged with pink. Orange and lemon, white and waxen, with sheltering green leaves. In front of the houses grew shrubs and vines, and scarlet and yellow flowers opened in profusion. There was no longer any desert. The wide, fruitful land was known as "The Happy Plains."9 
Article26 Dec 1912The article reads: Dundee Courier: Barking Dogs disturb neighbours, and owner is summoned and fined.
... Frances Fawkner, and Australian journalist, said that she lived opposite the defendant, and had been annoyed by the dogs for the past four years.10
Death*13 Feb 1919 Hammersmith, London, England, Mar Q [Hammersmith] 1a 431 (Age 53) - as FAWKNER. Died of influenza.1 
Death-Notice*20 Feb 1919FALKNER [sic].—On the 13th February, Frances Fitzgerald, only daughter of the late Dr. Thomas Elmes, and Mrs. Elmes, Berwick. (By cable.)11 
Probate (Will)*20 Mar 1919 FAWKNER Frances Fitzgerald of 48 Caithness-road Hammersmith Middlesex spinster died 7 February 1919 Probate London 20 March to Charles Henry Chomley journalist and Ethel Beatrice Ysobel Chomley (wife of the said Charles Henry Chomley). Effects £1705 2s. 7d.12 
Note During this time, Chomley’s London home in Ladbroke Gardens became a social hub for his fellow Antipodeans; as Brenda Niall writes in her biography of the Boyd family, Chomley’s restless temper and radical ideas fostered an environment in which topics of any manner could be discussed.
During this period of his editorship, a relationship was purportedly cultivated with fellow British Australiasian contributor and his wife’s closest friend, Frances Fitzgerald Elmes (known as Frances Fawkner); it has even been suggested that Chomley fathered two of Elmes’ children.
By 1914, the British Australasian was firmly established as a fixture of the Australasian community in London. Chomley would remain editor until his death in London in October 1942.
Predeceased by his wife in 1940, Chomley left daughters Isla, Francie, and Betty and son Arthur Charles.13 
Note*2013 Ethel Sara Fawkner Book written about Frances and her daughter:
Two Remarkable Women: Frances Fitzgerald Fawkner and Sara 'Sally' Rainforth
by Maria De Jong, Rosalind David
"Melbourne in the 1890s - women can't vote and unmarried mothers are social outcasts. Frances, a young journalist, believes in equal rights for women and their right to have children outside of wedlock. In 1905, pregnant and alone, she boards a steamship for London. Closely intertwined with the lives of Frances and her daughter Sally are the lives of Frances' best friend Ethel and her husband, author Charles Chomley ... As an adult in rural Wales, Frances' daughter Sally must learn to reconcile the past, her origins, and the loss of loves ones. Gardening becomes her passion. This intriguing double biography shows how women's lives are shaped by society's expectations and how social norms have changed. The book follows the lives of two strong women - Frances Fitzgerald Fawkner and Sara 'Sally' Rainforth."14

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1903Sutherland Road, Armadale, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: reporter. With Sarah Bamford Elmes.15
2 Apr 191145 Teddington Park, Teddington, Surrey, EnglandHead of Household: Frances Fitzgerald Elmes. Age 42 - Journalist
Member(s) of Household: Jefferson Francis Fawkner Ethel Sara Fawkner.16

Newspaper-Articles

  • 31 Dec 1881, A MERRIE CHRISTMAS APPEAL. TO THE EDITOR OF THE ARGUS. Sir, In another column I return my grateful thanks to the kind friends who have responded so liberally to my appeal on behalf of the inmates of the Immigrants' Home for the Houseless and Destitute Poor.
    The total amount I have received in money is £123 15s. 9d., besides a large quantity of clothing, and other articles in kind.
    I cannot refrain from giving special thanks to Mrs J. C. Bray, who for the second time has canvassed personally for donations in kind and money, the long list of which will be found elsewhere ; also to the young ladies of Mr. R. H. Budd's educational institute, who have again sent a valuable parcel of new garments ; to Miss Hare, of Hotham-hill, whose music pupils sent a number of useful articles and toys ; and, last, to Miss Frances Elmes, of Berwick, from whom a sum of £3 8s. was received, being the total of a large number of small sums which she, aided by two little friends, collected.
    To one and all, especially to you, Sir, for so kindly assisting in your columns, and also by receiving subscriptions, I return my best thank, and wishing you and all my friends a Happy New Year -I am, &c. ,
    ALFRED WOOLLEY, Hon. Secretary Immigrants' Aid Society and Home for the Houseless and Destitute Poor. Dec, 30.17
  • 3 Jun 1885, BERWICK SUNDAY SCHOOL TEA MEETING. The annual tea meeting and distribution of prizes to the children attending the Christ Churchof England Sunday school took place on Monday evening, the 25th May. For some considerable time past a special effort was made to obtain contributions for this purpose, and Mrs. Hill, Miss Vaile, Miss Frances Elmes and Mr. Michael Elmes succeeded in getting over £12. At an early hour on the morning of the treat Mr. Elmes, the superintendant, was seen with a horse and dray busily engaged conveying forms, fern trees, baskets of crockery and a lot of other things, towards the Temperance hall, and making great preparations for what was to follow. The internal arrangements were then seen to, and took some time to complete. They were no easy task, especially decorating the room with flowers, ferns, and evergreens, by Miss Vaile, who was assisted by some of the senior scholars. At four o'clock the children, numbering forty-two, took their seats at the tables under the guidance of their teachers. The tables were presided over by Mrs. Hill and Mrs. Mackinnon, Mrs. Browning and Miss Vaile. Miss Frances Elmes and Miss Cook, and were further adorned with some beautiful bouquets of flowers, which had been given by Mr. Kent. During the tea the Rev. Mr. Hill and Messrs. Hammond, Harold Vaile and Elmes assisted the ladies con siderably, in fact were kept going the whole time refilling plate after plate with scones, cakes, &c., Miss Coleman and Mrs. Taylor assisting. After the tea and everything had been cleared away, the Rev. Mr. Hill and Mrs. Hill distributed the prizes to the various winners (want of space prevents us from publishing the list in full), but before doing so Mr. Hill addressed the children and reminded them of their reason for meeting there that evening ; of the great obligations they were under to the superintendent and his excellent staff of teachers; that the teachers have been most painstaking, de nying themselves a great deal, and have produced such results as have never been attained at that school before; that the children who have obtained prizes this year should not regard them for their intrinsic value, but as an acknowledgment from their teachers for their past attention to lessons and good behavior, and those who have not been so fortunate should not be dishartened, but should strain every effort to carry off the prizes next year. Special prizes were awarded to Eugene Taylor, a the most regularly attending scholar in the school, and consisted of a handsome bible given by Mr. Fossey; to Lottie Shrapnel, for regular attendance, awarded by the superintendent, Mr. Elmes; and also one to Benjamin Cook, for good conduct. During the distribu tion of prizes Mr. Hammond, the head teacher, was engaged erecting a sciopticon, which was kindly lent for the occasion by Mr. S. Staughton, M.P. Mr. Hammond afterwards exhibited some very appropriate pictures, amongst which was "Blue Beard," and all of which amused the children greatly. As each picture ap peared it was well explained by the Rev. Mr. Hill, Mr. Elmes, and Mr. Harold Vaile, each relieving the other occasion ally. After passing a most enjoyable even ing the children gave cheers for their superintendent, teachers, the Rev. Mr. Hill, and Mr. Staughton, and when the National Anthem had been sung the meet ing broke up, it being about eight o'clock.18
  • 10 Jul 1895, BERWICK.
    On Friday night an entertainment was given in the Rechabite Hall, the proceeds of which, probably about L10, will be given to the mechanics' institute committee. The audience was the best seen in the hall for a long time, and the character of the entertainment first-class. The programme included the following : —Overture, Jeunesse Doree, Misses Searle and Swallow; glee, Hark, the Lark, by the Company; song, The Distant Shore, Rev J. Hill, song, The Old Countree, Miss Taylor; fantasia (violin and piano), Miss Buck and Mr Nelson; song, Simon the Cellarer, Mr Henderson ; Le Lac, Mons Charriol; ventriloquism, Mr Fiiser: pianoforte duet, The Witch's Flight, Misses F. Taylor and N. Madden; song, Pierrot, Miss Buck; song, Mr Dean ; violin solo, Killarney, Mr Nelson ; song, They all belong to Mary, Mr Fraser; song, Anchored, Mr Henderson ; song, Mr W. a'Beckett ; glee, Oberon, by the Company. M. Charriol was encored for his item, and Mr Fraser was very funny with his ventriloquism. The latter was deservedly encored for his comic song; which he gave in great style.
    The entertainment concluded with the production of a farce entitled Matrimony, which was very creditably performed by local ladies and gentlemen. Mr. Jack Elmes and Miss Elmes (Mr and Mrs Jonathan Blount) were in splendid form. Miss Ella Walter as Evelina, and Miss Winnie Walter as Gwendoline, showed how the men should be handled. The part of the domestic servant, as played by Mr C. Walter, was one of the best pieces of character acting ever seen in Berwick. From start to finish he had the audience roaring with laughter, and his make up was perfect. Mr J. B. Wilson as Fred Billings, and Mr Bob Elmes as Algie Montmorency suited their characters exactly, the former being of a very stand off disposition and the latter a swell with hard luck. Altogether the farce may be termed the funniest ever played here. Mrs Rankine and Miss Nellie Searle played the accompaniments during the evening. The stage was under the capable supervision of Mr R. R. Bain, and business matters were controlled by Messrs Smith and Coop.19
  • 4 Sep 1895, A vocal and dramatic entertainment will be given in the Rechabite Hall, Berwick, on Friday night, in aid of the funds of the local mechanics' institute and free library. The first portion will comprise a concert programme, the entainment terminating with an original farcical comedy, written expressly for the occasion, entitled "The New Woman."20
  • 11 Sep 1895, Berwick. A very successful vocal and dramatic entertainment, in aid of the funds of the local mechanics' institute and free library, was held in the Rechabite hall on Friday evening last, and, despite the unfavorable weather, was largely attended. General regret was expressed at the absence of Mrs H. J. Rankine, one of the most energetic workers in organising the affair; she was unable to attend through illness.
    After an interval of five minutes a farcical comedy, entitled The New Woman was produced, the characters being undertaken as follows:—The Rev Theodore Sloppy, Mr C. Walter ; Jeffrey Heathcote, Mr J. B. Wilson; Pat, Mr J. Elmes; Pussey Perkins, Mr R. Elmes; Gussey Perkins, Miss Pitcairn ; Lillie Trott, Miss Elmes. The piece was from the pen of a local writer and appeared to take very well with the audience. The principal part was that of the Rev Theodore Sloppy, who falls into the hands of the Misses Perkins; as also does Jeffrey Heathcote. The new women teach the Rev. Sloppy many things that the orthodox man of the cloth is supposed to know nothing of, and the abovenamed four finally pair off. The piece was gone through nicely and evenly.
    The accompaniments during the evening were efficiently played by Miss Nellie Searle.
    A good sum was realised for the institute.21
  • 13 Feb 1897, Mrs. W. A. C. A'Beckett, of the Grange, Narre Warren, held a drawingroom meeting on Monday, February 1, for the purpose of discussing woman suffrage. Over thirty guests were present. To suit their convenience they were invited to the Rechabite hall, Berwick. The speakers were Mrs. Bear Crawford, Miss Lister, Mrs. Lowe, and Mrs. A. M. Boyd. Afternoon tea was then served. Among those present were Mrs. and Miss Elmes, Mrs. and Miss Barrows, Mrs. and the Misses Walter, the Misses A'Beckett (Walwyn), Miss Mackie, Miss Jennings, Mrs. Brown, Mrs, Ponder, Miss Higgins, and others.22
  • 14 Jul 1897, Then .. an original farce, written specially for the occasion by Miss Elmes, entitled "Is marriage a failure," with the following cast of characters:—
    Mr. Percival Wingfield, Mr. W. G. a'Beckett;
    Mrs Percival Wingfield, Miss Elmes;
    'Arry, McGordan McRae;
    Lizzie, Mr. C. Walters.
    The presentation was much enjoyed. The acting of Miss Elms and Mr. Chris Walters being highly meritorious.23
  • 15 Jul 1897, BERWICK. The character concert in aid of the All Saints Church of England passed off very successfully on Friday evening inst., 9th July. There was a large attendance, and an excellent programme was rendered, concluding with a farce, "Is marriage a failure, which pleased the audience. Mr Chris. Walter was highly appreciated, taking the part as "Lizzie" to perfection. The concert resulted in a net profit of £11.24
  • 28 Jun 1898, Aramac's Passengers.— The A.U.S.N. Co.'s steamship Aramae arrived from Melbourne to-day after a fine weather passage. Passengers: ... F. F. Elmes....25
  • 3 Apr 1901, DESCRIPTION OF THE MANSION. (BY LINO.)
    Stonington was built some nine years ago. It is situated in Glenferrie-road, near its junction with Malvern road, and commands a very fine view of the Dandenong Ranges and the country lying between. The build-ing which is in the modern style, with wide pillared balcony, facing north and west is in colour a light grey, and is Iarge and very comfortable in every detail. It contains 20 rooms exclusive of pantries, kitchens lavatories and bathrooms and of these the most noticible are on the ground floor. The main hall which is divided half-way up its length with pillars and screens is in French Renaissance style panelled in carved American oak. Its parquet floor is mainly covered with Persian rugs. There are all manner of comfortable chairs, couches and divans scattered about. Big palms overshadow quaint India and Japanese bronzes. A grotesque dragon with the faithful detail, and in the extraordinary attitude which delights the Oriental mind, holds a lamp, and a bronze Manniken grins at her cheerfully from his stand on an inlaid table. It is possible to move all the furniture, bronzes and statues in the space of a few minutes and leave a big room for dancing, the square space only broken by the pillars and the wide staircase which runs down into the centre. On the right the diningroom, its bow window facing the front lawns is pannelled in oak also its decorations being in early English style. The tapestries hung on the walls are some of the now very rare Windsor tapestries, and were designed by Percy Anderson, famous in London as the dress artist for the most celebrated actresses and smartest society women. The large chandelier is of very quaint design, being a kind of copy of St. Giles's Cathedral, Edinburgh.
    The drawingroom attracts general atten tion. It leads directly from the hall, and is exquisite in colouring and general effect. It is Louis XV in style, and its gold suite is covered in hand wrought tapestry, with Watteau figures and flowers on a cream ground, each chair and couch having its own particular design. The walls show a very charming frieze, the pastoral scenes in the centre of each being the work of Mr John Ford Paterson. The ceiling itself is panelled in amber, turquoise blue; and gold.
    Leading from the drawingroom is a dainty boudoir, where Cupids sport on the ceiling, and blue true lovers' knots adorn the dainty white mantelpiece. The walls are decorated with repousse work and silk tapestries and there are fragile satin-wood tables and all manner of bric-a-brac. There is a comfortable library, a morning-room which hoists several fine pictures, and be yond this the billiard-room, in which is a genuine Landseer.
    The oak staircase leads in wide low steps out of the hill, and up into a gallery on the landing the many bedrooms lead out of this, and are exeedingly comfortable and well arranged. The state Governor cannot fail to feel that his lines have fallen in pleasant places in at least as far as his home is concerned.
    As regards entertainment, there is every opportunity and facility for it. The lawns offer charming spots for a marquee. The wide verandah, lighted, as indeed the whole house is, with electric light, will seat several hundred guests, and suggests an ideal place for supper or afternoon refreshment. The hall, as has already been stated, makes an admirable ballroom. And with all these possibilities for entertainment, the house is yet essentially homelike and comfortable.
    There are no draughty passages, no long corridors, no echoing unused rooms; and entering a side door from the lawn one is struck afresh by the harmony of colour, richness of design, and unobtrusive luxury of the place. The architect was Mr Chas d'Ebro, of Queen street, the decorators Messrs. Paterson and Sons, of South Melbourne.26
  • 18 Apr 1901, THE BUTCHER'S BILL. (By LINO.)
    There is consternation among housekeepers. Meat is going up in price—has already gone up. Butter, milk, and eggs are dearer, yet the same allowances must cover the week's bills. What is to be done? Economise! "I have economised all I can," exclaims the harassed housewife "I can't feed the family on beans and macaroni." Without having vegetarian meals, there still remains something to be done. And the first step is to learn to cook. With that knowledge everything is possible—without it nothing.
    Learning cooking too often means learning how to make and ice a few cakes, how to make a trifle, a fondue, and, may be, even a souffle or an omelet. These accomplishments are little more than frills in the ordinary kitchen, and bear close resemblance to the capabilities of the singer who sings songs in a foreign language, with no knowledge of the language itself.
    Learning cooking should mean as thorough an acquaintance with prices, with economies, with making things dovetail, as with the various materials and condiments themselves. The Australian housewife has earned a deservedly worldwide reputation for extravagance in culinary matters. She is too often content to run through such a menu as the following:—Chops for breakfast, cold beef for lunch, roast mutton for dinner, rump steak for breakfast, hash for lunch, boiled mutton for dinner, sausages for breakfast, cold mutton for lunch, roast beef for dinner, and so on. At the end of the week, contemplating an enonnous butcher's bill, she exclaims bitterly, "What am I to do? We must have meat. Hie boys won't eat anything else, and I simply can't afford it, yet we waste nothing." By wasting nothing she means that she never throws away cold meat. Quite what housekeepers of this type are going to do through the coming winter it is impossible to say, unless they are willing to learn cooking from a competent and economical teacher, otherwise they may be forced to put their families on half rations, with occasional meals of haricot beans and rice. It is cheaper to cook well than badly, cheaper to have four or five courses in the place of two or three. There will be much more serving and washing up, but the saving will be pronounced. But, again, it is repeated, the housewife must herself know how to cook that she may teach her servants.
    In speaking to an accomplished house keeper who has the smartest little dinners possible, and whose butcher's bills for all that are delightfully small, she related an experience that befell her the other day. I received a telegram saying that two friends were coming to dinner with me, I had intended going out to dinner myself, as, save for the servant, I was alone in the house. In the safe were two very small chops, a slice of beef, and four tomatoes. I had only one hour before me, and this was the material for dinner. I sent out for a pound of Murray cod, a 6d tin of cream, and 2lb. of pears. I put the chops on to stew and to make a little stock, their ultimate fate with the assistance of the slice of beef, being rissoles. The cod was put on to boil, and with the tomatoes, some milk, cream, and necessary flavouring, I made tomato soup. The result was very fair, though I say it myself. The tomato soup was followed by fish creams; the rissoles, piled on mashed potatoes, and a gravy made of the stock well flavoured. Mind, I have taught my servant how to fry. And that is an accomplishment which is so rare in Australia as to be almost non-existent. There fore those rissoles, egg and bread crumbed, with correct seasoning, were really good. A joint, of course, was out of the question, so we concluded our meal with stewed pears, rice, whipped cream, and, of course, cheese and coffee. I doubt if the whole thing cost more than half a crown. When one can cater at that price, there is still hope even if beef is 9d. and chops 6d. a pound."
    "But," exclaims an impatient housewife, "what use would it be for me to set a little dinner like that before my four hungry boys, my hungry self, and my hungry husband?"
    Certainly in such a case a menu like the above is useless, but here lies the secret of economy, for all that. Have a joint for the piece de resistance, but take the edge off the big appetites with a good soup and an entree. Soup is one of the cheapest things possible, and may be delicious; it is by no means necessary for it to be the wretched Julienne, which nowadays is only coloured and flavoured with the memory of bygone richness and glory. Nor does a consomme suggest any thing good, for it is, as a rule, first cousin to the stodgy white sauce poured over cauliflower. It is quite within reason to make excellent soups, each with an identity of its own at the smallest possible cost. A good white soup is one which owes its existence to the stock in which yesterday's fish was boiled. It has had the head and other fragments returned to it, has been reboiled, strained, milk cream and flavouring have been added, and it is excellent. Hare soup is made from the remains of jugged hare, with brown stock added. All kinds of vegetable soups, not forgetting pea soup, which, when well made, is excellent. After a good soup, chicken souffle—which, though made of a 4½d. rabbit, no one suspects when whipped to a cream. Then roast beef and plenty of vegetables, and the six big appetites will surely be sufficiently dulled not to need a very large helping, or, at any rate, not a second one. Afterwards sweets of some description. The following day the sirloin will appear cold, following artichoke soup and devilled kidneys. It will be surprising if that sirloin does not put in an appearance on the third day in the form of rissoles or such like.
    Another point. Let every housewife learn how to make a curry. Too often one meets a dreadful hybrid, whose father is hash and its mother stew, differing from them in that it is a pallid yellow green in colour, its indiarubber-like body floating in a sea of thick yellow liquid through whose surface peer flaccid rings of onion. That is not curry, even if it does owe a small debt to the curry powder bottle. Nor is the dull gluey mass plopped round it worthy of the name of rice. A true curry is not difficult to make, but it requires brains—human brains—and when it is made and sent to the table with a loose pile of snowy rice on a dish beside it, it is a fascinating thing. A wise housewife boils a large quantity of rice—a really good curry needs it. One of the great points about curry is that it is satisfying; it is too rich to eat very much of.
    In England, though meat is always very dear, one finds households where the in come is a small one, but where, for all that, the meals betray no meanness, nor even economy. The English housewife has learnt a lesson which Australians would do well to take to heart—that cheap things are not necessarily nasty. There are all manners of good dishes waiting to be made out of what may be described as odds and ends. In England more attention is paid to vegetables, they become quite a feature at any and every dinner-table, and it is more than worth while to pay attention to the various ways of preparing vegetables for the table. There are other ways of cooking even a cabbage than boiling it. As for rabbits, which we have always with us, they lend themselves most satisfactorily to all sorts of dishes. Not only stewed, fricasseed, turned into chicken, made into scallop, souffle or pie, the rabbit is also useful for stock, for the basis of my dish for which white meat is required. And with the big white Murray cod or even a barracouta, there need never be any trouble about a cheap breakfast dish or entree.
    In cooking, as in everything else, if a thing is done well it is a success, therefore to attain success in economy of cooking never let the store-room run out of essences, flavourings, sauces and chutneys; they are the backbone of made dishes, and the cook, who endeavours to "do without things" invariably fails in the end, and rouses an unprofitable and annoying discussion of the merits of such and such a dish, paterfamilias probably forbidding its reappearance at any time if he happens to be in a bad humour, and all that it lacked maybe was a flavouring or a sauce.
    Economy, therefore, must deal in what are in the trade known as "smalls," in rabbits, fish, vegetables, and fruit. It must have a well-stocked store-room, it must know how to cook, and, in its cooking, learn how to fry. There will be no need to live on beans and rice if more attention is paid to meals in the matter of soups and made dishes, and the necessary joint can make its appearance, and last two or even three days, instead of only one, as at present.27
  • 1 Nov 1902, WOMEN OF THE MALLEE (BY LINO.)
    Sat 1 Nov 1902, p15 - http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9071177
    Sat 8 Nov 1902, p15 - http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article908742428
  • 7 Nov 1902, Additional stimuless will be given to the stream of generosity in aid of the starving farmers of the north, by the remarkable article by "Lino" in the "Argus" on Saturday. It is the plain unvarnished narrative of an eye witness, who has been commissioned by that journal to investigate the domestic side of the doleful picture. "Lino" has driven across the Mallee and interviewed the women folk in order to ascertain something of the struggle for existence which is being so nobly maintained by these brave partners of brave-hearted men.
    Notwithstanding the hardships which they have endured and the prospects of starvation staring them in the face, there is no whining or complaining on their part. Their duty as they conceive it, is to bear a cheerful view and smiling face when possible, in order to encourage the husband in his heartless tusk of fighting against the hostile forces of Nature.
    What a splended lesson is conveyed to the spoiled beauties of fashion in our cities and elsewhere, whose only thought is for themselves and whose greatest anxieties of life are comprehended within the limits of the milliners and dress makers art. Adversity is the great character builder, and many a valuable lesson may be learnt from the graphic
    description of disaster, borne with such noble fortitude and heroism by our unfortunate brothers and sisters in the North.29
  • 20 Dec 1902, Another member of The Argus staff, Miss Frances Elmes, better known as Lino, has also gone to Europe by the Australia, on a six months leave of absence.
    Miss Elmes' father, the late Dr. Elmes, of Berwick, used to write and draw clever cartoons for The Australasian.30
  • 21 Aug 1903, It is not often nowadays that at a second annual meeting of a comparatively new society the financial position can be declared to be "entirely satisfactory," but this has happened with the Writers' Club, and should serve to dissipate the idea of woman being only another name for extravagance. The Club affairs in question have been exceedingly well managed, and the report and balance-sheet presented give much satisfaction. Several very pleaseing gatherings have taken place during the year, and the Club seems justifying its raison-d-etre by forming a bond of union among members.
    Among those present at the meeting was Miss Elmes, who has just returned from London with a store of pleasant experiences wherewith to entertain fellow members. The Club now numbers forty members, and is progressing well, mainly through the exertions of the energetic secretary, Miss Alice Henry.31
  • 7 Jan 1904, Also welcomed back from the 'Big Smoke' was Miss F. F. Elmes ('Lino,' of the Argus).32
  • 7 Jan 1904, "Miss Conway (the pink, plump, dimpled niece of Argus editor Watterston) gave an 'at home' last week in return for numerous attentions lavished on her since her return from England. The Writers' Club, that quietly solid institution, mustered in force—the hostess is on its committee, and one of the earliest members. Also welcomed back from the 'Big Smoke' was Miss F. F. Elmes ('Lino,' of the Argus).33
  • 1 Sep 1904, There was an unusally large and brilliant gathering at the Austral Salon, last Monday afternoon, when Mrs. Joseph Saddler was hostess. The guests included Lady Madden, Lady Wrixon, Lady Davies, Lady Gillott, Mrs. Gotch, Mrs. J. Westley, Mrs. W. Pitt, Sir A. Snowden, Mrs. Bennick, and many other well-known people. The hostess, who received at the door, was gowned-richly in black figured louisine silk, with touch of white about the vest, and small white and black hat. The rooms were prettity decorated with camellias, narcissi and violets, with graceful foliage. Dainty refreshments were served during the first part of the afternoon, and in the intervals. The programme opened witn a paper by Miss Elmes—"Retaliation"—supposed to be a baby's opinion about its parents, which is by no means growing.34
  • 1 Sep 1904, The Austral Salon was charmingly decorated on Monday last with masses of wattle blossom and wax-like camellias, when Mrs. Joseph Saddler gave an afternoon party. The hostess received in a black striped broche, appliqued with satin bands; toque of black and white chiffon. There were a large number present, amongst whom were Lady Madden and Miss Rowan, Lady Gillott, Lady Davies, Mrs. Lynch, Mrs. James Westley, Mrs. Godfrey, Mrs. Arthur Snowden, Mrs. Rennick and other well-known people.
    The programme consisted of a paper on "A Day in a Baby's Life" by Miss Elmes.
    Miss Alice Gray sang sweetly two of Noel Johnston's songs. Miss Sara Lewis gave with much taste two short numbers — a pupil of hers, Miss Gursaneky, also sang. Miss Margery Gray played Elgar's "Mazurka," in a firm, bright manner. Miss Lens Conly's beautifiul voice was heard in "Sing, Sweet Bird," and a dainty little encore. Miss Jessie Armstrong was very successful in her recitations, whilst Miss Natalie Dawson played a pianoforte solo and most of the accompaniments in her usual finished manner, Miss Wood also accompanied. Tea and coffee were served during this most enjoyable afternoon.35
  • 3 Sep 1904, Mrs. Saddler, assisted by Miss Armstrong, gave an afternoon party at the Austral Salon on August 29, when there was an exceptionally large gathering. The programme comprised an amusing paper by Miss Elmes, songs by Miss Sara Lewis, Miss Lena Conly, Miss Aliee Gray, Miss Garsansky, and Miss Conly. Miss Nathalie Dawson was accompanist, and Miss Margery Gray (gold medal winner) played Elgar's "Mazurka" on the violin. Miss Jessie Armstrong recited "The Game of Life." Sydney Grundy's comedy, in one act, ''Man Proposes," concluded the programme. Among the guests were Lady Madden and Miss Rowan, Lady Wrixon, Mrs. Gurner, Lady Holroyd, Mrs. Cross, Mrs. James Murphy, Lady Gillott, Mrs. M'Leish, Miss Martin, Mrs. Cooper, Mrs. Rocke, Lady Davies, Mrs. W. Alcock, Mrs. Christian, Mrs. V. J. Saddler, Mrs. Wrigley, Mrs. J. H. Moss, Mrs. George Horne, Mrs. Gotch, Misses Manton, Mrs. Armstrong. Mrs. Westley, Miss Conway, the Misses Wallis, Mrs. W. Pookes, Mrs. George Godfrey, Mrs. Woollard, Mrs. Bride, Mrs. James artin, Miss While, Mrs. Neave, Mrs. Grist, Sir Arthur Snowden, Mr. Joseph Saddler, Mr. Kenneth Cross, Mr. Freeman Nott, and others.36
  • 16 Jun 1905, Next Tuesday afternoon the Writers' Club give Miss Elmes, the widely-known press writer, a farewell tea at the Austral Salon. Miss Elmes, who sail for England, where she has obtained an important engagement, makes one more of the successful penwomen of Victoria, and the Writers' Club feel no little pride at the success of the member it sends forth to old-world literary and press pastures.37
  • 29 Jun 1905, Miss Elms, who has been a journalistic identity in this quarter for several years, has had a 'call' to London. She left on Friday, bearing a travelling bag donated by the Argus, and a gew-gaw by the Writers' Club, and comforts for the voyage given by many private friends. The active little lady has such humor that she was able to supply plain, solid feminine copy to the Freetrade daily and jocular views to one or two Melbourne weeklies. Her new post is that of reporter on the London Morning Leader.38
  • 30 Jun 1905, Miss Elmes of the "Argus" and the Writer's Club, who sailed for London last Friday, where she has obtained a good appointment, was presented with a pretty brooch, in the form of a true lover's, knot, set with turquoise and pearls, on behalf of the members of the club. The presentation was made by Mrs. Donald MacDonald, who is secretary to the club, with the best wishes of the members for Miss Elmes' happiness and continued prosperity. A farewell tea was also given, and a very pleasant afternoon spent at the Austral Salon.39
  • 7 Apr 1906, ''The Melbourne Cookery Book" (E. W. Cole, Book Arcade, Melbourne) has been compiled with the object of aiding the housewife who has to study ways and means. It aims at assisting the cottage, villa, and the ordinary household. Out-of-the-way dishes have been carefully avoided, and the every day dish liberally dealt with. The recipes are clearly Bet forth, and the directions for making them leave no room for doubt. The book, which only costs a shilling, is certainly a useful one.40
  • 7 Apr 1906, PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED. From Mr E. W. Cole, of the Book Arcade, we have received the Melbourne Cookery Book, a cheap publication compiled by F. F. Elmes especially for the assistance of households, cottage and villa homes, who must carefully study ways and means. Each chapter commences with valuable observations on the general rules to be observed in cooking the different varieties of food, and there is a large number of excellent though simple recipes for economical dishes of a simple but tasty nature, well adapted to those who have to keep house on small or moderate means.41
  • 19 Apr 1906, MELBOURNE COOKERY BOOK. We have received from Mr. E. W. Cole a copy of the above volume, by F. F. Elmes. It is designed particularly for the cottage and villa housewife, and therefore the numerous recipes are designed on strictly economical lines. Particular attention is paid to the preparation of various soups, all easily made and inexpensive. Sold at a nominal price the book should be very handy and have a ready sale.42
  • 28 Aug 1906, ENGLISH COUSINS. AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. "Yes," said the Australian girl, pensively, "gloves are certainly cheaper here, but only one shop in ten will try them on for you. I often sigh for good old Melbourne and Sydney methods, where, even if you did pay six and nine, you got exactly what you wanted." " Same in N'York." The American girl surveyed her shining shoes with evident pleasure. "You do pay through the nose at home, but you do get attention. In this country the young person behind the counter hasn't begun to learn her business." " And the size of her feet and hands," went on the Australian girl, irrelevantly. " At home I was chaff ed because I take fives in one and six and a quarter in the other. Over here, that's quite small for a girl my size. Englishwomen run to sevens in gloves and sixes and sevens in shoes." "Shocking," returned the Ameri can, with feeling. "But what makes me right down weary is the meek way a girl who has a small dress al lowance settles straight off into a dowd. Have you noticed that ?" "Noticed it?" The Australian voice was full of scorn. "I'd be ashamed to walk down Collins street with two of my cousins, and so far from having a small dress allowance, they have good ones. L100 a year each, and their hats. Oh, my dear, their hats!" The American groaned. "I know; aren't they awful? Heaps of lovely hair screwed into hard knots, clean round faces, round felt hats, good serge skirts or their hats, and coats with braid on them." "That's a sight better than the cousins who wear ready-mades, and put cheap rouge and cheaper powder on their faces. I've got some of that kind." "'But why do they do it?" " Shall I tell you?" The Ameri can stood in front of the mirror, and arranged a lock of hair with infinite tenderness. "Do." "They've no initiative." The Australian pondered a minute, " I believe you are right." " Right, of course, I'm right. A square box of a woman with high shoulders, high cheekbones, high nose, high everything, sees a little petite thing like that Queensland girl upstairs, dressed in a little bolero, and floppy waist, and skirt made just as a skirt should be made. Also with a mad little, dear little toque all cocked on one side, and her pretty hair fluffed up beneath it. Away goes your box-like Englishwoman and copies her. Oh, the pathos of it. The hat is worse of all, for you may take for granted that the box-like one arranges her hair in a hard line over a wire pad, and she sets the toque quite straight on top of this, and expects purple roses to suit her. No initiative, that's the secret. No Englishwoman will ever do anything unless everyone else is doing it. When she tries to be smart (I'm talking of the middle-class, not of society) she's flash." "You like being over here, though?" "I just love it, and I love the English, they're so quaint, but I never forget all the time that I'm an American." '" They never let me forgot I'm an Australian—not that I want to—but they say, 'Do you have asparagus in Australia ? Oh, fancy ! And when it's midsummer: with you it is also Christmas—how exceedingly odd !' Now, if there is one remark more than another of which I am utterly weary it is being told that it is odd to have summer in December, with the accompanying remark that it must seem odd to me to have sum mer in June." "I should say so." " Then they ask if I don't think Kew Gardens very wonderful. Kew Gardens are all right, but it requires great self-restraint not to tell them about the Sydney and Melbourne Gardens. Further, we went to Kew the other day and took our lunch, or tried to. At home you take your lunch into the gardens, and eat it comfortably anywhere you like, and no one ever makes a mess with papers and scraps, not even on King's Birthday or Cup Day, when there's a regular slum crowd ; but here the one idea is 'Don't.' What ever you suggest that isn't quite ac cording to rule, you are told 'Don't,' or ' It is not done.' " " Lack of initiative," conmmented the American, polishing her nails. " They say we lack reverence, as a nation," went on the Australian. " I suppose they mean we aren't over whelmed at the importance of consti tuted authority. We have heaps of reverence for ourselves; we call it self-respect, and when we have gar dens belonging to the people, we find that the people take care of them." "I don't think the English use hand glasses." The American was bored with the characteristics of Australians. " What do you mean ?'" " T'hey never see themselves front more than one point of view. Miss Smith's hat is a case in point. If she had a hand glass and could see the back of her head below that blue bow, and if Mrs Berkley could see her shoulders in evening dress, and if Miss Pilley-Park had a notion of what her nose was like in profile." " And they are my grandmothers, and your great-great-great-grandmo thers ?" " That's so. They're dear things, but they have only one point of view, and this lack." " Yes, yes, you said so." " Well, I say it again. They want everything cut and dried." " Especially blouses." The American made a wry face. " Aren't they awful ? Mlillions and millions of waists of the same stuff, in the same pattern, the same size. My dear, it's typical; but what can you expect of a nation that doesn't consider a sewing-macline as neces sary in the home as a stove? The trouble lies in the fact that an Eng lish cousin thinks the ready-made 4s 11¾d. blouse she buys at a sale in Ox ford street as good or better than this." She surveyed her perfectly-cut, perfectly-fitting, elegant blouse with satisfaction. " Yet I love them." " I love them, too; they're dear things, but it makes you feel good, eh, to belong to a new nation. What?" —F. F. Elmes, in the "British Australasian."43
  • 27 Dec 1906, About Australian journalists in London : Harry Thompson, formerly chief sub-editor Daily Express, now runs Earl's Court, the great pleasure-ground, where London flocks during the summer months. Martin Donohue, war correspondent and genial person generally, runs the Daily Chronicle office in Paris. L. J. Brient is engaged in press-agency business. Miss Elmes, formerly of Melbourne Argus, is doing well in feminine journalism. Ethel Mills has been successful in placing stories and getting on the right side of the London editor. E. C. Buley has succeeded Jack Scantlebury as editor of the British Australasian, and has for sub-editor Leon Brodzky, formerly of Melbourne Herald. Bernard Espinasse contributes to various journals.44
  • 26 Apr 1907, Miss F. F. Elmes, whose work is so well known in Australia and London, both in literary, and journalistic lines, has recently had an article accepted by the 'Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News,' which deal's with some off the sporting experiences of Mr. J. A. Austin, who has done, so much big game hunting in different parts of the world. The interview is illustrated by some interesting photographs. Miss Elmes was for many years on the staff of the Melbourne "Argus.45''
  • 28 Sep 1907, The mail this week brings many interesting details of Miss Stone's wedding to Sir George Doughty. ... Ever so many well-known Australians were present at the wedding, Miss Elmes and other journalists being among them.46
  • 20 Nov 1907, A marriage that will interest many pen-women on the Sydney side is that of Miss Frances Elmes, who left Melbourne a couple of years ago to take up a position on a London daily; she is now Mrs. Fawkner. Her husband is an American journalist, and their home will be in U.S.A.47
  • 6 May 1908, Rosalind. By F. F. Elmes.
    It was strange meeting you that night. I don' t know why I had wandered down to the embankment, as well there as anywhere perhaps. The water was black, but quivering lights shot through to its very depths, seeking for long lost souls far down in a quiet bed.
    The city was behind me. Beside me the queer stolid stone known as Cleopatra's Needle with its aura of strange Oriental mystery blending strangely with the squalid materialism of London.
    Where had you come from?
    "Antony," you said, and you laid a little cold hand on mine. You spoke as naturally as if you had expected to tind me there. You were not a bit surprised. You wore a close black fur hat, and a black gown, and your big eyes looked black in your pale face; even your brown hair looked black with no sunlight to warm it. You seemed a piece of the strange inscrutable black night.
    "From where have you come?" I asked.
    "From where! How do I know." You laid your arm along the stone wall and leaned your cheek on it as if you were tired.
    "I wander, you know, Antony. You found me in Sydney; I find you in London. The embankment is a likely enough place for both, eh? It belongs to such as me. The air round here is alive with queer thoughts—the thoughts of outcasts. Not the thoughts of busy travellers, but the thoughts of weary idlers. How many arms have not rested here, while eyes looked out dully and blankly at the mysterious water. Bah, you laughed. What a lot of pleasure we 'uns get out of our troubles. What are you doing? Still writing poems?"
    "A play at present."
    "Made any money?"
    "I pawned my overcoat yesterday."
    "And I a locket."
    "Have you had any dinner?" You shook your head, Rosalind.
    "I'll have plenty next week," you said. "Perks has promised me a place in the chorus."
    "Where are you living?"
    "With a girl who's as well off as myself."
    "Come home with me. I still have something to pawn I expect. Then we'll go out and have some dinner. Do you remember that last dinner in Paris?"
    "Dear, yes, and the pretty Italian boy at the next table who made eyes at me."
    "Rosalind, why didn't you tell me that I might have killed him?"
    "Why should I. He was such a dear boy."
    The stairs up to my room were dark, so we held hands, and counted the steps. Once inside I lighted a candle, and you, taking a seat on the table, pushed all my papers in a heap.
    "What can you pawn?" you asked, looking round the attic. What indeed! The walls were bare, the cupboard bare. Then I opened a little black box on the mantleshelf, and took out a miniature in a gold frame, and handed it to you, Rosalind.
    "Who is she?" you asked.
    "A girl in Ireland, who thinks I am going to set the Thames on fire, and marry her."
    "And are you going to marry her?" Your eyes narrowed a little.
    "No."
    "Why?"
    "Need you ask? Could I—look at me—could I marry a girl like that. Why it is sacrilege for such as I to even possess her picture. What am I? A beggar, a derelict, a failure. She shall now add one more to many kindnesses, unmerited kindnesses. Her picture shall pay for our dinner to-night."
    "You laughed Rosalind, and your dark eyes hardened.
    "She shall pay for no dinner for me, I want none."
    "Yet a pawnbroker's shop is a more fitting place for her than this garret."
    "You chose to be melodramatic. It will naturally please you to see her face in a pawnbroker's window."
    "I will only take the frame."
    "I want no dinner I tell you."
    You slipped from the table and moved towards the door.
    "I'll be indebted neither to her face nor her frame. You may. Men are like that, and women too. She would be glad' to give you a dinner, but a dinner shared with me," you laughed contemptuously, "even if I would share it." You tossed your head and straightened your shoulders.
    "I had no more intention of pawning that than of selling any ragged fragments that remain of my soul to the devil."
    "You mean that?"
    "I mean it." You came back and leaned against the table; a slight little swaying figure, your hands spread on the table behind you.
    "One reason why you will never marry her is that you do not love her."
    "How do you know?"
    "Oh, I know. You revere her, adore her, but you don't love her. Put her picture away. Sigh sadly, and be your real self again."
    "What is my real self?" "A person who'll pawn his waistcoat, and be amused if he remembers afterwards that there was a shilling in the pocket."
    "Well, let's pawn the waistcoat."
    You laughed gaily. "That'll be sixpence. Hardly enough, my Antony. How about this?" You pulled up your skirt, "Look." A bright pink silk petticoat was revealed.
    "That's half a crown at the very least, though it has got a tear. That'll be three shillings. We'll have a marvellous meal, sweetheart." Y'ou slipped off your petticoat, and I my waistcoat, then extinguishing the light, we went down the stairs again hand in hand.48
  • 26 Sep 1908, STORY OF A PICTURE. Miss Dora Ohlfsen, the Sydney sculptor now resident in Rome (writes Miss F. F. Elmes in the Melbourne "Argus"), tells a story of the theft of a picture. A German baroness commissioned her to paint her portrait. When it was finished the baroness, accompanied by her brother, visited the studio. The latter engaged Miss Ohlfsen in conversation while the baroness began to make arrangements to remove her portrait. Miss Ohlfsen protested, saying she had not given permission for it to go yet, und on this the baron struck her, and the pair depnrted with the portrait. Miss Ohlfsen instituted legal proceedings, amd the case attracted much attention, and occupied a whole year. The baroness contended that the picture was hers, and that she would keep it. Miss Ohlfsen declared that until she sent it out of the studio it was hers. She ultimately gained the day, had the picture returned, and the baroness and her brother were committed to prison.49
  • 7 Nov 1908, Publications received: The Melbourne Cookery Book, by F. F. Elmes, from o'Cle's Book Arcade, price, one shilling.50
  • 14 Nov 1908, Miss F. F. Elmes has issued an enlarged edition of "The Melbourne Cookery Book," which has been published by Messrs. Fraser and Jenkinson, Melbourne, and sent to us by Mr. E. W. Cole, of the Book Arcade.
    It is compiled especially with the view of assisting the housewife in the cottage and villa home, who must carefully study ways and means. The majority of the recipes have been gathered from approved sources. They have been tested by good cooks, and show that to have nice meals and tasty dishes it is not necessary to spend a great deal of money; "but it is necessary to spend a little time and thought, and also to have at heart a few kitchen axioms insisted on throughout these pages." The writer is a believer in soup, and says that the most important of all stock-pot axioms is "Cook slowly and cut small," a rule that holds good whether a shin of fresh beef is being used or merely bones and scraps from the table and the safe. Another rule on which stress is laid is that in making soup fresh meat and bones and cooked meat and bones should never be boiled up together. We notice one mistake in the directions for cooking vegetables. Potatoes should not be soaked in water at all before being boiled. Miss Elmes's book
    will be found very useful by all housewives.51
  • 21 Nov 1908, THE HOUSEHOLD. Melbourne cookery book.
    The more one considers local conditions the greater the conviction that the imported cookery book is of less use to the average Australian housewife than the locally produced article. The new and enlarged edition of the "Melbourne Cookery Book," by F. F. Elmes, goes to prove the contention. It might well be designated the small home cookery book, seeing that from' cover to cover it is full of hints and suggestions for making a shilling do a whole shilling's work. What is more to the point, it provides the country housewife, with her limited scope, for variety, with alot of most encouraging recipes. In addition to actual cookery there is much information, on the subject of sandwiches, sweets and the like. Sauces, soups and recipes for preparing fruit and vegetables all combine to make the little book, which costs only a shilling, and is obtainable at Cole's Book-arcade and from most booksellers, a really welcome one.52
  • 31 Dec 1908, C. H. Chomley edits the BRITISH AUSTRALASIAN. His cousin, R. L. Outhwaite, famous for having stood as a Freetrader against Chamberlain at Birmingham, write splendid articles against British landlords in the DAILY NEWS. Ethel Mills still works as a journalist, Sophie Osmond is a successful writer of popular fiction. F. F. Elmes is now married and does not write so much.53
  • 31 Dec 1908, C. H. Chomley edits the British Australasian. His cousin. R. L. Outhwaite, famous for having stood as a Freetrader against Chamberlain at Birmingham, writes splendid articles against British landlords in the Daily News. Ethel Mills still works as a journalist. Sophie Osmond is a successful writer of popular fiction. F. F. Elmes is now married and does not write so much. Margaret Baxter, from Sydney, is a great light of the Austral Club, the Australian woman's club in London. She has given up singing for journalism.54
  • 16 Jan 1909, SOCIETY LETTER. Dear Nell,—If it wasn't for Christmas and New Year what a lot of people there are we would gradually lose sight of. All this month you get more news of distant friends and acquaintances than you do for the rest of the year. Perhaps this is mostly the case if you include many journalists or artists among those friends. Folk of this sort are proverbially averse to writing, and both glory alike in the post card. Lady Doughty, whom you knew as Eugenia Stone, has sent out to her many friends a set of verses in which she voices certain contemplations on an Australian Christmas as she views it from England. .... Among the quite permanently settled are Mrs. Faulkner, whom you remember as Miss Elmes. She contributes to various English papers, and lives with her two children at a charming little place at Richmond.55
  • 10 Mar 1917, "The Children at Kangaroo Creek," by Miss Frances Fitzgerald, is a story of Australian life which will appeal to juvenile readers. Here we have four young folk who are sent from Melbourne to a country farm. Discipline is somewhat strict, and the martinet who is the guardian of their welfare is not over amiable. But they take things as they come in a philosophic spirit, and realise that Kangaroo Creek has many compensations. None of their adventures is very striking; their diversions and excitements are those of the ordinary Australian child in the count!y. But the author writes from knowledge that is obviously first hand, and although the book is meant for children the senior who reads it will find a sort of melancholy pleasure in its reminder of many bush delights in which, more years ago than he cares to think about, he took such a hearty zest. (The British Australasian Co.)56
  • 24 Mar 1917, The Children at Kangaroo Creek. "The Children at Kangaroo Creek," by Frances Fitzgerald (London, "British Australasian" office), is a pleasantly told story of the experiences, on a bush farm, o fthe four little Hamilton orphans who live with their uncle in a Melbourne suburb. The uncle has to go to Japan on business, and the children are sent off, to their other guardian, their mother's cousin, Mr. Roliit, together with their governess. Mr. Roliit is an amiable, absent-minded naturalist, who cares for little besides butterflies and beetles, and his wife is a tart-tongued, bad-tempered woman who, childless herself, has no sympathy with-Children. The Hamilton children, having been, accustomed to run a little wild on their good-natured uncle's place, find Cousin Martha's ideas as to discipline rather trying. However, their 'natural sprightlines's of spirit is unquenchable, and tho story of their experiences and escapades at Kangaroo Creek will make good reading for Other young people.57
  • 11 May 1919, FRANCES FITZGERALD FAWKNER. Another Victim, in London, of Pneumonia
    Mrs. Frances Fitzgerald Fawkner was another victim to pneumonia in London. Mrs. Fawkner left Australia about 15 years ago, and went to London to try her fortune. In Melbourne while at tached to the Argus, she did notable work, and was largely responsible for starting the fund that helped the Mallee through the great drought. Recognising in Mrs. Fawkner a writer of unusual ability the Argus management sent her through that district when things were at their worst. With the courage that always characterised her Mrs. Fawkner (then Miss Elmes) drove day after day, the buggy going over dreadful roads and through choking dust, and day by day, as her vivid articles appeared, large subscriptions flowed into the Argus fund. Mrs. Fawkner retained her connection with the Argus and Australasian until her death, being social correspondent for the latter paper for all the 15 years she was in London. She was a prominent member of the staff of the British Australasian, her long experience in Aus tralia being invaluable, for that paper. Two children survive this plucky Australian, who sacrificed an especially bright career for the daily grind that was necessary if she wished to keep her family with her. This she succeeded in doing, through years of indifferent health, preserving her little home and making it ideal for her children. Mrs. Fawkner's rare insight into the child mind was shown by her book, the Children at Kangaroo Creek. The British Australasian has opened a Frances Fitzgerald Fawkner Memorial fund, the interest on the money subscribed to be given to people in distress, a memorial that would have pleased Mrs. Fawkner more than anything in the world. Out of her little she always found help for others. The London Times obituary notice contained this sentence : "During the last four years she had been untiring and self-sacrificing in giving help and comfort to soldiers, and to women and children suffering distress through the war."58
  • 13 May 1919, LIFE OF SERVICE ENDS. WOMAN JOURNALISTS CAREER. Mrs Frances Fitzgerald Fawkner, who died from pneumonia at her home in Hammersmith, England, on February 7, was better known in Australia as Miss Frances Elmes. Her mother lives at Berwick. Mrs Fawkner was English by birth, but being only a year old when she came to this country, Australia may fairly claim her as one of its talented countrywomen.
    Mrs Fawkner's strong personality was an inheritance, in part at least, from her father, the late Dr. Elmes, the last years of whose life were spent at Berwick. Among other things, he acqured fame as a surgeon in the old Crimean days. His daughter early identified herself with journalism, and was a well known "Bulletin" contributor before she became permanently associated with the "Argus" and "Australasian."
    About 11 years ago she settled in London, and became a principal member of the literary staff of the "British-Australasian." She also succeeded as a short story writer, and ranked among the finest of women journalists. Her only published book, The Children at Kangaroo Creek, is not as well known as its merit deserves.
    A woman of strong personal charm, Mrs Fawkner won many hearts, and the beauty and strength of her character cemented innumerable friendships. She was always ready to hold out a helping hand to those in distress, and many Australians in London have been grateful for her kindly assistance. Subscriptions have been invited by the "British-Australasian" for a Frances Fitzgerald Fawkner memorial, which will take the form of a permanent fund to be used primarily for necessitous Australians and New Zealanders who are without friends in London. At the end of February, £153 had been received. Subscriptions may be sent to the Editor, "British-Australasian," 51 High Holborn, London, W.C.
    Between Mrs Fawkner and her young son and daughter a remarkably, strong bond of affection existed, and much sympathy goes out to these children.59
  • 15 May 1919, Anglo -Australian journalism and the Australian community in London have suffered a severe loss in the death, after a short illness, of Mrs. Frances Fitzgerald Fawkner. For nearly 15 years Mrs. Fawkner's work has been familiar to readers of the 'Australasian.' Before that she was, as Miss Elmes, on the staff of the 'Argus,' and it was during this time that she drove through large tracts of the drought stricken Mallee country, writing her impressions of those scenes of desolation with such a vivid and sympathetic pen that she brought considerable subscriptions to the relief funds. In London she has contributed to many well-known papers and magazines, and two years ago published her first book, 'The Children at Kangaroo Creek,' a charming story of Australian childhood that is just on the eve of a new edition. Her second book is to be published this year. A woman of exceptional ability and great wit and charm, she will be sadly missed by literary folk in London, and by hosts of friends on both sides of the world.60,61
  • 17 May 1919, Woman Journalist's Career. Mrs. Frances Fitzgerald Fawkner, who died from pneumonia at her home in Hammersmith, England, on February 7, was better known in Australia as Miss Frances Elmes. Her mother lives at Berwick. Mrs Fawkner was English by birth, but being only a year old when she came to this country, Australia may fairly claim her as one of its talented countrywomen. Mrs Fawkner's strong personality was an inheritance in part at least, from her father, the late Dr. Elmes, the last years of whose life were spent at Berwick. Among other things, he acquired fame as a surgeon in the old Crimean days. His daughter early identified herself with journalism, and was a well known "Bulletin" contributor before she be came permanently associated with the "Argus" and "Australasian." About 11 years ago she settled in London, and became a principal member of the literary staff of the "British-Australasian." She also succeeded as a short story writer, and ranked among the finest of women journalists. Her only published book, The Children at Kangaroo Creek, is not as well known as its merit deserves. A woman of strong personal charm, Mrs Fawkner won many hearts, and the beauty and strength of her character cemented innumerable friendships. She was always ready to hold out a helping hand to those in distress, and many Australians in London have been grateful for her kindly assistance. Subscriptions have been invited by the "British-Australasian" for a Frances Fitzgerald Fawkner memorial, which will take the form of a per manent fund to be used primarily for necessitous Australians and New Zea-landers who are without friends in London. At the end of February, £153 had been received. Subscriptions may be sent to the Editor, "British-Australasian," 51 High Holborn, London, W.C.
    Between Mrs Fawkner and her young son and daughter a remarkably strong bond of affection existed, and much sympathy goes out to these children.62
  • 24 May 1919, Many of the current weeklies express sincere regret at the death, from pneumonia, of a lady journalist who, as "F. F." (Frances Fitzgerald), contributed articles and sketches of striking merit to the "Argus" and "Australasian" for many years. Mrs. Frances Fitzgerald Fawkner was the daughter of the late Dr. Elmes, famed as a surgeon in the Crimean war. It is scarce a dozen years ago since she left these shores to dwell in England with her husband. Her literary work was kept up through the pages of the "British Australasian," and it was ours no more to read the ever-interesting, true-to-life, homely sketches of Australian life, which were full of a quiet humour that caused many a smile to dawn and broaden! A versatile writer, a lovable woman, has gone to her wellearned rest in dear "F. F." She leaves a little son and daughter, of whom she was passionately fond, to mourn a wise and affectionate mother's loss.
    Some time ago in these columns I mentioned that Mrs. Fawkner had published a book entitled "The Children of Kangaroo Creek." Not widely known here yet, now that the gifted authoress has laid aside her pen for ever, it will, after the way of the world, be eagerly enongh sought after:—"Strange we never prize the music Till the sweet-voiced bird is flown"! How true are these lines, and how applicable, in particular, to the Australian reading public! But the war has taught many a useful lesson, and Australians, let us hope, will no longer set a low estimate on the intellectual powers of their own literary workers, no more than they will on the prowess of their now-renowned fighting men. It is sad to think, however, of the many who have gone (of the Australian literaryworld), disheartened, and even, poverty-stricken, to their obscure graves.63
  • 8 Jul 1919, WOMEN'S CORNER. The Australian writer we knew years ago as Francie Elmes died recently in London of 'flu (says a Sydney paper). She had married in England, and was Mrs Fitzgerald Fawkner. Two children aro left. The "British Australasian" is now making public appeal for a Frances Fitzgerald Fawkner memorial, which will take the form of a permanent fund to be used for the assistance of hard-up Australians and Maorilanders in London. Mrs Fawkner's mother is living in Melbourne, and there is a great sadness among the Australian friends of the bright little penwoman.64
  • 5 May 1921, A coincidence of names which happened at a private house in one of the southern suburbs last week caused some laughter. When three of the guests adjourned to the billiard-room and began to arrange a game it was found that they all bore bird names—being Mr. Crow, a visitor from Sydney; Mr. Hawk, who fittingly enough is a great traveller, and seems to have flitted about or swooped over a good part of the world; the third, Captain Raven. Naturally it caused much joking, for a more unusual and appropriate combination could not be recalled by any of those present. Once, long ago, I remember an even more unusual coincidence of names; it was when Miss Frances Elmes was writing for one of the Melbourne papers. In a small company of about eight one evening it was discovered that there were Elmes, Ashe, Juniper and Wood, three tree names, and wood, their substance.65

Citations

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    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article208002361
    attributed to Frances F Elmes.
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    Gale Document Number: GALE|ID3227594260.
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    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1434010
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    Niall, Brenda. Martin Boyd: A Life. Carlton, Victoria: Melbourne University Press, 1990. Print. Pgs. 74–76
    Niall, Brenda. The Boyds. Melbourne: Melbourne University Publishing, 2007. Print. Pg. 150.
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    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70034916
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    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article228446469
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    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10543878
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    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10546051
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    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9071177
    Sat 8 Nov 1902, p15
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9087424
  29. [S14] Newspaper - Morwell Advertiser (Morwell, Vic. : 1888 - 1954), Fri 7 Nov 1902, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65879329
  30. [S14] Newspaper - Critic (Adelaide, SA : 1897-1924), Sat 20 Dec 1902, p10
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article212153697
  31. [S14] Newspaper - Fitzroy City Press (Vic. : 1881 - 1920), Fri 21 Aug 1903, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65651477
  32. [S14] Newspaper - The Bulletin. Vol. 25 No. 1247 (7 Jan 1904).
  33. [S14] Newspaper - The Bulletin, 7 Jan 1904, p16.
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    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article145848014
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    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article175404637
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    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article139117996
  37. [S14] Newspaper - Fitzroy City Press (Vic. : 1881 - 1920), Fri 16 Jun 1905, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65653159
  38. [S14] Newspaper - The Bulletin, 29 Jun 1905, p14 In: 'A woman's letter.'
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    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65653196
  40. [S14] Newspaper - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Sat 7 Apr 1906, p44
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article139182020
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    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article221219997
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    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146122412
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    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article78334586
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    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article61555951
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    WOMAN'S WORLD. Dominion, Volume 12, Issue 246, 11 July 1919, p4
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    New Zealand Times, Volume XLIV, Issue 10337, 22 July 1919, p8.
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Last Edited24 Oct 2018

Joseph Graham Gay

M, #10202, b. 1823, d. 24 Sep 1860
Birth*1823 England. 
Marriage*18 Sep 1860 Spouse: Sarah Bamford Turner. St John The Evangelist, Clifton, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England.1
 
Marriage-Notice*22 Sep 1860September 18, at St. John's, Clifton, Mr. Joseph Graham Gay, of Bristol, to Sarah Bamford, daughter of the late John Turner, Esq., of Highridge-house, Somerset.2 
Death*24 Sep 1860 Crickhowell, Breconshire, England, Sep Q [Crickhowell] 11b     94.3,4 
Death-Notice*29 Sep 1860September 24, at Crickhowell, accidentally drowned whilst fishing, Joseph Graham Gay, Esq., of Marsh-street, Bristol, aged 37.5 
Probate (Will)*18 Oct 1860 GAY Joseph Graham. 18 October 1860. Letters of Administration of the Personal estate and effects of Joseph Graham Gay late of the City of Bristol Wine Merchant deceased who died 24 September 1860 at Crickhowell in the County of Brecon were granted at Bristol to Sarah Bamford Gay of 10 King's parade Durdham Down in the said City Widow the Relict of the said Deceased she having been first sworn.
Effects under £1,500.6 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 29 Sep 1860, Mr Joseph Gay, wine and spirit merchant, of Bristol, while enjoying the honeymoon in Monmouthshire, on Monday, went to fish in the River Usk. In hooking a fish he lost his balance, was carried away by the stream, and was drowned.7
  • 27 Oct 1860, A Bridegroom Drowned.—Mr Joseph Gay, wine and brandy merchant, of Bristol, was married a few days since, and went on his wedding tour was staying for a while at Crickowell. He proceeded to the river Usk for the purpose of angling. He caught one fish, and somehow, whilst endeavouring to hook his second, he lost his balance, and being precipitated into the water, was carried away by the stream, and drowned.8

Citations

  1. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Ancestry.com. Bristol, England, Select Church of England Parish Registers, 1720-1933 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - Bristol Mercury, 22 Sep 1860, p8.
  3. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG 9; Piece: 1728; Folio: 64; Page: 14; GSU roll: 542858."
  4. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  5. [S14] Newspaper - Bristol Mercury, 29 Sep 1860, p8.
  6. [S190] Index to Probate Calendar England, viewed at ancestry.com.au, 1858-1966.
  7. [S14] Newspaper - Birmingham Journal, 29 Sep 1860, p6.
  8. [S14] Newspaper - Westmoreland Gazette, 27 Oct 1860, p6.
Last Edited26 Jul 2018

Willie Austin Stewart Doxat

M, #10203, b. Sep 1869, d. 19 Sep 1893
Father*Henry Doxat b. 1820, d. 23 Sep 1882
Mother*Fanny Annie Pratt b. Jun 1846, d. 28 Feb 1931
Birth*Sep 1869 Kensington, London, England, Sep Q [Kensington] 1a 104.1 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel4 Jun 1888 Sailing with Fanny Annie Doxat, Henry Tully Doxat, Annie Maud Doxat, Louisa Harriet Doxat to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Fifeshire
Age 18 - as Austin.2 
Death*19 Sep 1893 Primrose-Park, Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, #D8904 (Age 24) [par Henry DOXAT & Fannie Annie PRATT].3 
Death-Notice*21 Sep 1893DOXAT.-On the 19th inst., at Primrose-park, Beaconsfield, Willie Austin Stewart Doxat, eldest, surviving son of the above, after 2½ years' patient suffering, of consumption, aged 24.4 
Probate (Will)*3 Jan 1895 DOXAT Willie Austin Steward of Primrose park Beaconsfield colony of Victoria gentleman died 19 September 1893 Administration London 3 January to Fanny Annie Gower (wife of Alfred Granville Gower) Effects £282 15s.5 

Grave

  • 4-409-A+B, Berwick Cemetery, Berwick, VIC, Australia, Doxat Hetty (Louisa Harriet) 1876 - 1918
    Doxat Willie Austin Stewart 1869 - 18936

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  2. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Victoria, Australia, Assisted and Unassisted Passenger Lists, 1839–1923
    possibly travelling with Percy Power, aged 26 (crossed out).
  3. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "reg Berwick."
  4. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 21 Sep 1893, p1.
  5. [S190] Index to Probate Calendar England, viewed at ancestry.com.au, 1858-1966.
  6. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    4-409-B     Doxat     Louisa H.     F     42     8/10/1918     611
    4-409-A     Doxat     Willie Austin W.     M     24     22/09/1893     268.
Last Edited14 Dec 2014

Fanny Annie Pratt

F, #10205, b. Jun 1846, d. 28 Feb 1931
Married NameGower. 
Married NameDoxat. 
Birth*Jun 1846 Saxmundham, Suffolk, England, Hundred of Plomesgate. Mother was unmarried.1 
Marriage*Sep 1868 Spouse: Henry Doxat. Blean, Kent, England.1
 
Widow23 Sep 1882Fanny Annie Pratt became a widow upon the death of her husband Henry Doxat
Marriage*Mar 1888 Spouse: Alfred Granville Gower. London, Middlesex, England, Mar Q [Kensington] 1a 211.1,2
 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel4 Jun 1888 Sailing with Willie Austin Stewart Doxat, Henry Tully Doxat, Annie Maud Doxat, Louisa Harriet Doxat to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Fifeshire
Age 41.3 
Death*28 Feb 1931 Southfields, Wandsworth, Surrey, England, (Age 85) Residence 329 Wimbledon Park Road. Probate London 14 Apr to Alice Elsie Winifred Gower, spinster. Effects £ 365 10s 9d.1 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
2 Apr 1911Craiglea, Wimbledon Park Road, Wimbledon, London, England(Head of Household) Alfred Granville Gower;
Age 55
Member(s) of Household: Alice Elsie Winifred Gower4

Family

Henry Doxat b. 1820, d. 23 Sep 1882
Children 1.Willie Austin Stewart Doxat b. Sep 1869, d. 19 Sep 1893
 2.Louisa Harriet Doxat b. 1876, d. 7 Oct 1918

Citations

  1. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Weller/Jones Family Tree - Owner: Michel_Jones.
  2. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  3. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Victoria, Australia, Assisted and Unassisted Passenger Lists, 1839–1923
    possibly travelling with Percy Power, aged 26 (crossed out).
  4. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG14; Piece: 2402."
Last Edited14 Dec 2014

Louisa Harriet Doxat

F, #10206, b. 1876, d. 7 Oct 1918
Father*Henry Doxat b. 1820, d. 23 Sep 1882
Mother*Fanny Annie Pratt b. Jun 1846, d. 28 Feb 1931
Birth*1876 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel4 Jun 1888 Sailing with Fanny Annie Doxat, Willie Austin Stewart Doxat, Henry Tully Doxat, Annie Maud Doxat to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Fifeshire
Age 12 - as Hetty.1 
Death*7 Oct 1918 Kew, VIC, Australia, #D13341 (Age 42) [par unknown].2 
Death-Notice*10 Oct 1918DOXAT.-On the 7th October, Hetty, the dearly loved sister of Maud Doxat, Burlington street, Oakleigh.
A weary sufferer at rest.3 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
190368 or 86 Brougham Street, Kew, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Annie Maud Doxat.4
19098 Waterloo Street, St Kilda, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Annie Maud Doxat.5

Grave

  • 4-409-A+B, Berwick Cemetery, Berwick, VIC, Australia, Doxat Hetty (Louisa Harriet) 1876 - 1918
    Doxat Willie Austin Stewart 1869 - 18936

Citations

  1. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Victoria, Australia, Assisted and Unassisted Passenger Lists, 1839–1923
    possibly travelling with Percy Power, aged 26 (crossed out).
  2. [S4] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Great War Index Victoria 1914-1920.
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 10 Oct 1918, p1.
  4. [S103] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903.
  5. [S109] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1909.
  6. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    4-409-B     Doxat     Louisa H.     F     42     8/10/1918     611
    4-409-A     Doxat     Willie Austin W.     M     24     22/09/1893     268.
Last Edited14 Dec 2014

Richard Hodge Francis

M, #10216, b. 1837, d. Apr 1895
Birth*1837 Devon, England.1 
Death*Apr 1895 Elsternwick, VIC, Australia, #D5343 (Age 58) [par John FRANCIS & Elizabeth HOWKEY].1 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 20 Apr 1895, DEATH OF MR. R. H. FRANCIS.
    We regret to announce that Mr. R. H. Francis, late of the Victorian Railway department, died at his residence, Elsternwick, on Tuesday. For some considerable time he had been suffering from an affection of the liver, and a few weeks ago such serious symptoms developed that he had to take to his bed, since which time his case had been regarded as hopeless. Mr. Francis was 58 years of age, and a native of Devonshire. He joined the railway service in September, 1862, as clerk in the Melbourne goods sheds, and the following year was promoted to the position of relieving stationmaster. In 1865 he was appointed stationmaster at Woodend, and during the ensuing 12 years he filled for various periods a similar office at Kyneton, Longwood, Benalla, Wangaratta, Maryborough, and Echuca. He became stationmaster at the last-mentioned town in 1877, and in May, 1881, he was made traffic manager of the eastern system. In July, 1883, he was appointed acting-assistant general traffic manager, and five years later his promotion to the position of traffic manager was made. On the retirement Messrs. Speight, Ford, and Greene from the management of the railways he succeeded to the post of chairman of the board of commissioners on the 19th of March, 1892, his colleagues being Messrs. Kibble and Murray. During his term as commissioner he suffered from ill-health, and he closed his connection with the department on the 10th of March, 1894. Mr. Francis was twice married, and leaves a grown-up family.
    The funeral took place on Thursday, and was attended by a large number of railway officers, who joined the cortege at Prince's-bridge. At the Melbourne cemetery the three Railway Commis sioners (Messrs. Syder, Woodroffe, and Lochhead), Mr. R. Kent (secretary of rail ways), Mr. Fitzpatrick (deputy traffic manager), and Mr. Cauty (deputy goods superintendent), acted as pall-bearers. The officiating clergymen were the Revs. P. Ballhache and A. Toomath.2

Citations

  1. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901.
  2. [S14] Newspaper - Australasian, 20 Apr 1895, p3.
Last Edited18 Dec 2014
 

NOTE

Many family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.