Thomas Mummery

M, #1051, b. 1856, d. 1936
Father*Christopher Mummery b. 1832, d. 30 Oct 1922
Mother*Sarah Eddington b. 1839, d. 1916
Birth*1856 Beechworth, VIC, Australia, #B10312 [par Christopher MUMMERY & Sarah EDINGTON].1 
Marriage*1897 Spouse: Georgina Annie May Craik. VIC, Australia, #M1377.2
 
Death*1936 Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #D1579 (Age 79.)3 

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901 "#M1377."
  3. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
Last Edited21 Jun 2019

David Seymour McCulloch

M, #1052, b. 1860, d. 26 Sep 1944
Birth*1860 Wigtonshire, Scotland. 
Marriage*6 Aug 1890 Spouse: Janet Margaret McDonald Craik. Berwick Christ Church, Berwick, VIC, Australia, #M4735.1,2
 
Marriage-Notice9 Aug 1890McCULLOCH-CRAIK -On the 6th inst, at Christ Church Berwick, by the Rev. J. Heffer Hill, David Seymour McCulloch, contractor to Janet Margaret McDonald, eldest daughter of Mr Geo Craik, of Kincraik, Beaconsfield.3 
Land-UBeac*29 Feb 1896 GEM-D-55. Transfer from Emma Annie Maria Craik to David Seymour McCulloch. 19a 0r 32p.4 
Land-UBeac*25 Aug 1914 GEM-D-55. Transfer from David Seymour McCulloch to Arthur Edgar Cyril Craik. 19a 0r 32p.5 
Death*26 Sep 1944 Malvern, VIC, Australia, #D10000 age 84 [par David McCULLOCH & Agnes McKENNA].6 
Death-Notice*27 Sep 1944MCCULLOCH.-On September 26, at private hospital, David, beloved husband of Janet Margaret, and father of Glenisla, David, Janet, Gretta, and Jock, in his 85th year.
McCULLOCH.-The Funeral of the late Mr. DAVID MCCULLOCH will leave Holy Trinity Church. Brighton road. St. Kilda. THIS DAY (Wednesday), at 2.30 p.m.. for the Springvale Crematorium. Service conducted by Rev. Doudney at 10.45 a.m.7 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 13 Aug 1890, ORANGE BLOSSOMS AT BEACONSFIELD. On Wednesday last Christ Church, Berwick, was a scene of unusual beauty, the occasion being the union of David Seymour McCulloch to Janet Margaret Mc Donald, eldest daughter of Mr. George Craik, of Kincraik, Beaconsfield. The church was beautifully decorated by the ladies of the congregation and choir with ferns, evergreens and wattle blossoms, and conspicuous among the beautiful flowers was a magnificent horseshoe, composed of maiden hair ferns-with white camelias, snowdrops and marguerites, placed over the entrance to the altar, which was partially screened by the decorations. The bridegroom was supported by Mr. Mc Alpine (who acted as best man) and Mr. J. H. Campbell, of Nar-nar-goon. The bride looked very nice in a biscuit-colored cashmere with front pannellings of cloth of gold, bodice of same with high epaulets. She wore the usual bridal veil and wreath of orange blossoms, and carried a most lovely bouquet of orange blossoms, snow drops and camelias. The bride was attended by five maids--Misses Nina and Ethel Craik (sisters of the bride), Lizzie, Janet and Katie Lyne, of Tooradin (cousins of the bride). They were attired in pearl grey French costumes with rich brocaded silk side pannels and mother of pearl orna ments, large grey felt hats with satin ribbon and ostrich feathers. Each wore a massive gold cable chain bracelet (presents of the bridegroom), and carried a superb bouquet. The marriage was solemnised by the Rev J. Heffer Hill. The responses in both cases, "I will," were uttered in low, clear, resonant tones, perfectly audible in the body of the church by the many spectators who had assembled to witness the ceremony, the bride, who claims Berwick for her birth place, being well known and universally respected. As the wedding party left the church Mendelson's Wedding March was very effectively rendered by the organist. At the conclusion of the ceremony the party drove to Kincraik, where a sumptuous breakfast awaited them, to which some thirty-five invited guests sat down. The usual toast having been proposed and responded to, the Rev. Mr. Hill spoke in eulogistic and feeling terms of the bride, whom he has known many years. Mr. and Mrs. McCulloch left Kincraik amidst a shower of rice and old shoes for Melbourne, en route for Sandhurst, where the honeymoon is to be spent. The "going away" dress was com posed of electric green cashmere with plush pannels same color, pretty grey felt hat with ostrich feathers and dove nestling amid a quantity of satin trimmings, gloves, &c., to match. The cake, which was a perfect wonder of confectioners' art, was four storied and measured 3ft. 4in. from base to summit. Among the guests present were--Mr. Harry Ricketson, Miss Edith Hadley, Mr. Charles Ferguson. Mr. and Mrs. Sam Mills (Mooroopna), Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Barr, Miss Maggie Barr, Rev. and Mrs. Hill, Misses Ada and Nellie Hollow, Mr. John McAlpine. Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Campbell, Miss Milburn, Mr. William Lyne (Tooradin) and many others. Among the presents, which numbered over one hundred, was-Pair chaste vases, Mrs. Alex. White; hand-painted ornaments, Miss Hadley; white coral group under glass shade, Mr. Alex. White; pair Dresden vases, Mrs. Andrew Jack; cheque, Dr. and Mrs. Elms Berwick; silver cake basket and pair pillows, Mrs. Lyne ; tea set and set tea tray, Ethel Craik; dinner service. Nina Craik : silver tea pot, Mr. C. Ferguson; plated cruet, Mr. A. B. Wallace; gold battle axe brooch set with pearls. Mrs. Rushall; pair shells., Mrs. White: drawingroom lamp. tapestry and plush drawingroom suite and centre epergne, Mrs. Craik; eperne, Mr. Ross; cheque, Mr. J. T. Taylor (Rushworth): electro cruet, Artie Craik; silver-plated tea pot, sugar basin and cream jug, Alan Craik : pair bronze figures, Miss Milburn; marble clock. Mr. McAlpine : set table cutlery, Mr. Jas. Thompson ; fender and fire irons, Mr. Paine; pair vases, Misses Lyne; set gold ornaments with pearls, employee of Mr. McCulloch; pair vases, Misses Hollow; set silver teaspoons, Mr. Moody, five o'clock tea set, chrystal but ter dish and sugar basin and pair hand painted candlesticks, Mrs. J. H. Campbell; travelling bag, Mr. Craik; ironing implements, Mr. Campbell; quantity household linen, Nina and Ethel Craik; and many others too numerous to enumerate.8
  • 2 Oct 1944, MR DAVID MCCULLOCH After a prolonged illness, Mr David McCulloch, a well-known grazier and business man, died last week in his 86th year. Born in Wigtonshire, Scotland, he arrived in Australia in 1878 at the age of 18, and for many years was a leading building contractor in Melbourne. Later he turned to grazing pursuits, and bought Tooradin Estate. Later in Victoria he acquired Harewood Mains. In New South Wales Mr Mcculloch owned for many years Tralee, at Parkes, this property eventually being bought by the New South Wales Government. In Queensland Mr Mcculloch held interests in Boonara and Merrimac, both these properties being subdivided and auctioned. The late Mr Mcculloch was one of the earliest members of the RACV, a councillor of Cranbourne Shire for many years, and a JP for 40 years. He is survived by a widow, two sons, and three daughters.9

Citations

  1. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901.
  2. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, Findmypast - Australia, Marriages, 1810-1980.
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 9 Aug 1890 p1.
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2351-108 - Emma Annie Maria Craik to David McCulloch of Whitehead Street Yarraville Contractor.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2351-108 - David McCulloch to Arthur Edgar Cyril Craik of Tooradin Marine Officer.
  6. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D10000 age 84 [par David McCULLOCH & Agnes McKENNA]."
  7. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 27 Sep 1944 p2.
  8. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 13 Aug 1890, p3.
  9. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 2 Oct 1944 p5.
Last Edited22 Jan 2016

Robert Gilbert King

M, #1053, b. 1868, d. 3 Apr 1935
Birth*1868 Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #B10974.1 
Marriage*8 Jan 1902 Spouse: Jessie Eleanor Parker. St George's, Malvern, VIC, Australia, #M125.2
 
Marriage-Notice*17 Jan 1902KING-PARKER-On thr 8th January, at St George's, Malvern, by the Rev. Canon Godby, Robert Gilbert, sixth son of Andrew King, Fettercairn, The Avenue, Windsor, to Jessie Eleanor, eldest daughter of the late F. L Parker, Quiamong Station, Deniliquin, N.S.W.3 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel19 Dec 1914 Sailing with Jessie Eleanor King Jessie Langloh "Loloh" King to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Ballarat London
Age 46 - Orchardist.4
Death*3 Apr 1935 "Quiamong", Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, #D13878 (Age 67) [par Andrew KING & Annie HUNT].5 
Death-Notice*4 Apr 1935KING - On the 3rd April (suddenly) at Quiamong, Upper Beaconsfield, Robert Gilbert, dearly loved husband of Jessie King.6 
Death-Notice5 Apr 1935KING-In loving memory of my father, who passed away on the 3rd April (Inserted by his loving daughter Loloh.)7 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1918 - 1934Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: orchardist. With Jessie Eleanor King.8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18

Grave

  • 4-041-A, Berwick Cemetery, Berwick, VIC, Australia19

Family

Jessie Eleanor Parker b. 1877, d. 27 Dec 1952
Child 1.Jessie Langloh "Loloh" King b. Dec 1903, d. 19 Aug 1969

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#B10974."
  2. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#B5575."
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 17 Jan 1902, p1.
  4. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Ancestry.com. UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
  5. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  6. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 4 April 1935 p1.
  7. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 5 Apr 1935, p1.
  8. [S118] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1918.
  9. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  10. [S121] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1921.
  11. [S122] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1922.
  12. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  13. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
  14. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926.
  15. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927.
  16. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  17. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  18. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934.
  19. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    4-041-A King R. Gilbert M 67 4/04/1935 929
    King Robert Gilbert died 1935 67 hus/ Jessie Eleanor (bw0845)
    4-041-A King Jessie F 2897.
Last Edited1 Jul 2018

Jessie Eleanor Parker

F, #1054, b. 1877, d. 27 Dec 1952
Married NameKing. 
Birth*1877 St Kilda, VIC, Australia, #B5575.1 
Marriage*8 Jan 1902 Spouse: Robert Gilbert King. St George's, Malvern, VIC, Australia, #M125.1
 
Marriage-Notice*17 Jan 1902KING-PARKER-On thr 8th January, at St George's, Malvern, by the Rev. Canon Godby, Robert Gilbert, sixth son of Andrew King, Fettercairn, The Avenue, Windsor, to Jessie Eleanor, eldest daughter of the late F. L Parker, Quiamong Station, Deniliquin, N.S.W.2 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel19 Dec 1914 Sailing with Robert Gilbert King Jessie Langloh "Loloh" King to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Ballarat London
Age 37 - Wife.3
Land-UBeac10 Jul 1919 GEM-D-44 (part). Transfer from George Wilson Martin to Jessie Eleanor King. Part and creation of easement (northern portion adjoining GEM-D-5.)4 
Land-UBeac10 Jul 1919 GEM-D-1 l/p 2461 (Lots 32.33.34.36.37). Transfer from George Wilson Martin to Jessie Eleanor King.5 
Land-UBeac*10 Jul 1919 GEM-D-5 (part). Transfer from George Wilson Martin to Jessie Eleanor King. Small triangular piece of land only between Brisbane Road and Gembrook Road.6 
Land-UBeac10 Jul 1919 GEM-D-1 l/p 2461 (Lots 28-31.35.38.39). Transfer from George Wilson Martin to Jessie Eleanor King.7 
Land-Note*10 Jul 1919 GEM-D-5.44 (part): Mortgagee: Alexander Fraser, Walter Lawson Appleby, Ernest Charles Melhuish and Joseph Alexander Thear - discharged 1 Jun 1921. Mortgagor was Jessie Eleanor King.8 
Widow3 Apr 1935She became a widow upon the death of her husband Robert Gilbert King.9 
Land-UBeac*24 Dec 1942 GEM-D-44 (part). Transfer from George Joseph Thomson to Jessie Eleanor King. Road access Brisbane Road.10 
Land-UBeac*21 May 1947 GEM-D-1.5.44 (part), Quiamong. Transfer from Jessie Eleanor King to Douglas McLaurin Graham Mary Glynn McCallum 'Mollie' Graham. 6a 2r 9p.11,12 
Death*27 Dec 1952 Corrabert, 210 Orrong Road, Toorak, VIC, Australia, #D18449 (Age 65) [par Frederick Langloh PARKER & Annie Grace WILLIAMS].9 
Death-Notice*29 Dec 1952KING, Jessie Eleanor-On December 27 (suddenly) at Corrabert, 210 Orrong road Toorak loved wife of the late R G King, and beloved mother of Loloh Buckley.
KING.-The Private Funeral of the late Mrs JESSIE ELEANOR KING of Corrabert 210 Orrong toad Toorak will leave the chapel of B Matthews Pty Ltd 102 Toorak road South Yarra TOMORROW (Tuesday) after a service commencing at 10.30 am for the Springvale Crematorium.13 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1918 - 1934Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Robert Gilbert King.14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24

Grave

  • 4-041-A, Berwick Cemetery, Berwick, VIC, Australia25

Family

Robert Gilbert King b. 1868, d. 3 Apr 1935
Child 1.Jessie Langloh "Loloh" King b. Dec 1903, d. 19 Aug 1969

Newspaper-Articles

  • 12 May 1910, Marriage of sister: MR. K. E. BROUGHAM TO MISS K. L. PARKER. The wedding of Mr. Kritu Edward Brougham, eldest son of Mr. John Brougham, of Poolamacca and Kynalla Stations, N.S.W., and Miss Katherine Langloh Parker, youngest daughter of the late Frederich Langloh Parker, of Quiamong, N.S.W.,
    was celebrated on 28th April at Christ Church, South Yarra, by the Rev. Claude Desailly. The church was decorated with palms and autumn leaves, and Mr. Shanks presided at the organ.
    The bride, who was given away by her brother (Mr. Hubert Parker), wore a cream satin, with overdress of ninon and pearl trimming. Her veil was of Limerick lace, and her posy was of lily of the valley. A diamond pendant (the bridegroom's gift) was also worn. The bridesmaids were Miss Henderson and Miss Dickson. They wore pale blue satin and ninon, with wreaths and bouquets of autumn leaves. The bridegroom's gifts to them were gold watches, set in wristlets. Mr. Bertie Williams was best man, and Mr. Arthur Henderson groomsman.
    After the ceremony a reception and daintily served wedding tea was held at "Coonac," Toorak, and Di Gilio's band played bright musical selections. The bride's mother received in a cream net and heavy guipure lace. A black velvet hat was set with black and white ospreys, and a red bouquet carried.
    The honeymoon was spent at Healesville, and afterwards in Sydney. The travelling dress was a coat and skirt of red frieze, with a smart hat in mole shades. About seventy near friends and relatives were present at the ceremony. Mr. and Mrs. K. E. Brougham will make their home at Gnalta Station, N.S.W.26
  • 7 Mar 1934, After the Polo. Many polo enthusiasts were present yesterday at a late afternoon party given at 1 Darling street by Mrs R G King, of Quiamong Upper Beaconsfield, and her daughter, Mrs Charles Buckley.
    Flowers in gay tints were arranged about the reception-rooms, and lilting music invited the younger guests to dance. Mrs King wore a suit of black suede-finished wool crepe and her little black hat had an eye-veil. Mrs Buckley's suit was in the new lichen green and she wore one of the picturesque ..mberess. When polo first became popular in Melbourne special tea parties at the Moonee Valley polo grounds were a regular feature of the March tournament, but in recent years these pleasant gatherings have been abandoned. It was, therefore especially delightful to find the "polo party" revived in a new guise, with the addition of cocktails and dancing.
    Among these invited were:—
    Mr Cecil Bray and Miss Phyllis Bray (Adelaide), Mr and Mrs Hugh Bullivant and Miss Biddy Bullivant (Wirringa, NSW), Mrs ton lill inn (?), Mr and Mrs A V Hisken, Mr and Mrs T Duncan, Lieut Colonel Knox, and Mrs Knox, Captain and Mrs C H Read, Mrs Alex Chomley and Miss K Chomley, Mr and Mrs Aitken, Mr John Gurner and Miss Brenda Gurner, Mr R O Blackwood, Miss Grizel Hamilton, Mr und Mrs Oscar Lempriere, Mr and Mrs Rodney Seagrave, Dr and Mrs Norman McArthur, Miss McArthur, Mr and Mrs James Bell (Albury), Mr and Mrs Reginald Boyd, Mr und Mrs J S Bloomfield, Mrs Hubert Parker, Miss Sue Parker Dr and Mrs Alan Mackay, Miss Deborah Hackett (Adelaide) Mr and Mrs Frank Faulkner, Mr Rupert Bunny, Miss G Pennefather, Mr and Mrs Finlay (Kyabram), Mr and Mrs S A Greaves, Mr Roy Treloar, Mrs Cedric Battle, Mr and Mrs W H Moule, Mrs Turner Shaw, Miss Mollie Turner Shaw, Mr and Mrs Sydney Casey, Dr und Mrs J A Gilruth, Mr and Mrs St J Somerset, Misses Gwenda and Mary Boyd, Mrs Norman McLean, Mr and Mrs Stanley Dobson, Dr and Mrs Gerald Weigall, Mrs Alex Sloane (Mulwala Station NSW), Mr and Mrs Rupert Greene, Mr P Warford Mein, Mr and Mrs Robert Bruce, Dr and Mrs Sidney Pern, Mr and Mrs Jim Leviny, Mr and Mrs J H Williams, Mr and Mrs Ernest Officer, Miss Peta Watson, Mr and Mrs A Robinson, Mr Norman Faulkner, Mr and Mrs Chopold Fink, Mr and Mrs L Keep, Mr and Mrs Weigall, Captain and Mrs G A Mansbridge, Mrs L P McBean, Mr and Mrs Warren Clark, Mrs Alison Clark, Mrs Eric Reid, Miss Alison Read (Berwick), Mrs John Good, Miss Ruth Good, Miss Patricia Clarke, Mr Anthony Clarke, Miss Doris Armytage, Mr J Armitage, Misses Ainslie Williams, Ivan Perry, Maisie Syme, Margaret and Joan Andrew Winney Peatder, Mollie and Eileen Finlay (Seymour).27
  • 19 Jun 1934, At the Alexandra Club yesterday Mrs R G King and Mrs Charles Buckley gave a small afternoon tea party to welcome relatives who are on a visit from Adelaide. The guests of honour were Mesdames W S Parker, W Rosenthal, Edgar Davidson and Hugh Davidson.28
  • 19 Jun 1935, Mrs R G King of Quiamong, Upper Beaconsfield, and her daughter, Mrs Charles Buckley, will leave by the Neptuna on June 25 for a visit to Hong Kong.29
  • 28 Jun 1935, SOCIAL NOTES: Mr. and Mrs. W. Anderson, of Kooringa, Marysville, Mr. and Mrs. Fleetwood, of the Western district, and Miss Fleetwood, Mrs. E. J. Jones, Dr. and Mrs. J. A. O'Brien, Mrs. R. G. King, of Upper Beaconsfield, and her daughter, Mrs. Charles Buckley, Mrs. G. L. Edwards, Mrs. G. E. Boyd, of Bacchus Marsh, and Miss G. J. Boyd, and Dr. and Mrs. N. V. McKenna are among the passengers who left by the m.v. Neptuna this week for a tour of the East. The Rev. and Mrs. F. G. Lewis are returning to Rabaul by the Neptuna.30
  • 3 Sep 1935, SOCIAL NOTES Mrs. R. G. King and Mrs. Charles Buckley have returned from a visit to Hong Kong. Mrs. King is staying at the Alexandra Club for a few days.31
  • 30 Jun 1936, Mrs R G King of Upper Beaconsfield and her sister Mrs Brougham of South Australia are in Melbourne for a few weeks and are staying at Corabert, Toorak.32
  • 5 Jan 1939, COUNTRY HOLIDAYS. At Beaconsfield & Berwick.
    PICTURESQUE Upper Beaconsfield is undoubtedly feeling the effect of the dry season, and its usually attractive scenery has, like the rest of the countryside, changed from green to brown, while very few of the private gardens are flourishing. Even the few lucky people who still have spring water are using it sparingly, and water is being carted to Upper Beaconsfield. The difficulties created by the water shortage are reflected in the fact that there are fewer holiday makers in the district than in other years, but those who are there—and their number is not inconsiderable—are enjoying the rest and change, which this popular resort offers.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charles Buckley's home at "Quiamong" is a half-way house for visitors at any time, and those who have called in during the holidays have received the usual warm welcome. Mrs. Buckley has two polo ponies, Dinah and Lena (a half Arab), and two Irish Terriers, Pilot and Whiskers, to say nothing of the emu, who claims much of her attention when she is not entertaining visitors.33

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888 "#B5575."
  2. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 17 Jan 1902, p1.
  3. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Ancestry.com. UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3757-353 - Jessie Eleanor King of Upper Beaconsfield Married Woman - C/T 4432-287.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2210-933 + C/T 3656-060 - George Wilson Martin to Jessie Eleanor King - C/T 4432-287.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2644-623 - George Wilson Martin to Jessie Eleanor King - C/T 4432-287.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3639-719 - Jessie Eleanor King - C/T 4432-287.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 4432-287 - Mortgage No 393559 - Alexander Fraser, Walter Lawson Appleby, Ernest Charles Melhuish and Joseph Alexander Thear - discharged 1 Jun 1921.
  9. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 5101-040 - C/T 6595-951 - Jessie Eleanor King of Upper Beaconsfield Married Woman.
  11. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 4432-287 - Douglas McLaurin Graham, Sales Representative and Mary Glynn McCallum Graham, Married Woman both of 258 Williams Road Toorak - joint proprietors.
  12. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 6595-951 - small part GEM-D-44.
  13. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 29 Dec 1952 p12.
  14. [S118] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1918.
  15. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  16. [S121] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1921.
  17. [S122] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1922.
  18. [S124] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1924.
  19. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
  20. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926.
  21. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927.
  22. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  23. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  24. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934.
  25. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    4-041-A King R. Gilbert M 67 4/04/1935 929
    King Robert Gilbert died 1935 67 hus/ Jessie Eleanor (bw0845)
    4-041-A King Jessie F 2897.
  26. [S14] Newspaper - Punch (Melbourne, Vic. : 1900 - 1918; 1925), Thu 12 May 1910, p27
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article176546299
  27. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 7 Mar 1934, p15.
  28. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 19 Jun 1934 p10.
  29. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 19 Jun 1935 p15.
  30. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 28 Jun 1935, p10.
  31. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 3 Sep 1935 p10.
  32. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 30 Jun 1936 p14.
  33. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 5 Jan 1939, p3.
Last Edited1 Jul 2018

Jessie Langloh "Loloh" King

F, #1055, b. Dec 1903, d. 19 Aug 1969
Loloh KING
(1903-1969)
Father*Robert Gilbert King b. 1868, d. 3 Apr 1935
Mother*Jessie Eleanor Parker b. 1877, d. 27 Dec 1952
Married NameBuckley. 
Birth*Dec 1903 Windsor, Berkshire, England, Dec Q [Windsor] 2c 418.1,2 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel19 Dec 1914 Sailing with Robert Gilbert King Jessie Eleanor King to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Ballarat London
Age 11.3
Marriage*20 May 1931 Spouse: Charles Simmill Buckley. St John's Church, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, #M2404.4
 
Marriage-Notice*21 May 1931THE BRIDE'S GUARD OF HONOUR.-Members of the First Berwick Rangers and of the First Beaconsfield Upper Guides' Troop formed a picturesque guard of honour for their captain, Miss Jessie Langloh (Lola) King, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. G. King, of Beaconsfield, who was married yesterday to Mr. C. S. Buckley, son of Mrs. Buckley, of Camberwell, and the late Mr. G. S. Buckley, at St. John's Church, Upper Beaconsfield. Following the bridal couple are Miss Sue Parker (bridesmaid) and Mr. R. Treloar (best man), and Miss Marjorie Good (bridesmaid) and Mr. R. Randell (groomsman).5 
Widow14 May 1966Jessie Langloh "Loloh" King became a widow upon the death of her husband Charles Simmill Buckley.6 
Death*19 Aug 1969 Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #D18449 (Age 65) -- as BUCKLEY.7 
Death-Notice*20 Aug 1969BUCKLEY, Jessie Langloh.—On August 19th, at hospital, beloved wife of the late Charles S. Buckley, of Mount Eliza.
BUCKLEY Jessie Langloh. —On August 19th, at hospital, loved cousin of Les Parker and Sue Stoney, of South Yarra.
BUCKLEY.—The Funeral of the late Mrs. JESSIE LANGLOH BUCKLEY will leave the Angel Chapel, St. John's Church of England, Toorak Road, Toorak, THIS DAY (THURSDAY), after a service commencing at 12.12 p.m. for the Springvale Crematorium.8 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1925 - 1928Quimong, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties.9,10,11,12
1942Quiamong, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Charles Simmill Buckley.13

Newspaper-Articles

  • 22 Mar 1928, A DELIGHTFUL COUNTRY DANCE HELD AT UPPER BEACONSFIELD
    A NUMBER of their friends motored up from town last Saturday night when Miss Aileen Kellaway and her brother, Harding, gave a jolly dance at their home at Upper Beaconsfield. The night was a perfect one for a dance and the big verandah, dimly lit with Chinese lanterns, an ideal spot for dancing. In spite of the long drive up, nobody felt tired, and the evening proved thoroughly enjoyable.
    Mr and Mrs Kellaway helped their daughter receive her guests in the lounge, which, like the supper room, was decorated with big bowls of roses from the lovely gardens of "Windara." Mrs Kellaway wore a handsome gown of black georgette relieved with a touch of vivid red introduced by bending on the right hip. Miss Aileen Kellaway looked charming in a frock of larkspur blue georgette hooped over the hips and finished with a trailing shoulder flower of pink and sliver. Her two sisters also wore georgette frocks, Lucy's a pretty shade of light blue with floating panels lightly beaded with silver, while Phyllis chose a dainty frock of waterlily green.
    Among the guests were: Miss Phyllis Smith, whose pretty frock of leaf green ring velvet was inlet with tangerine embossed georgette. Miss Betty MacBride, who wore a bridge coat to match with her old rose frock; Miss Lola King, whose lemon georgette was draped at one side. Miss Norah Strahan looked well in a striking frock of pink and black chiffon, defined at the waist with a lattice design of narrow sil ver lace and beads. Miss Molly Morton danced in a frock of almond green georgette, the peacock skirt with deeper satin.
    Miss Jean Couchman's pretty frock of black spotted net and satin was set off with a diamente buckle. Miss Ruth Littleton was in peacock frock of pale blue satin relieved with tangerine. Miss Nance Mitchell chose mauve floral taffeta. Miss Bobbie Blackie's frock of floral marocain over a foundation of midnight blue was edged with grey fur. Miss Phyllis Perry wore jade green banded with glittering silver beads. Miss Peggy Stringer looked sweet in autumn toned crepe de chine. Miss Dorothy Lamble's pretty dress of mauve ninon had blue ruchings. Miss Ailsa Patterson was in daffodil taffeta frock.
    Partners included: Messrs L. Yunckon, Keith Emerson, Donald Armstrong, Jack and Lister Drake, F. Penman, A. Smith, Eric Field, L. Hambleton, D. Littleton, Norman Mitchell, Ken Doery, L. Rowland, and T. B. Dodds.14
  • 23 May 1929, Miss Lolah King, of Upper Beaconsfield, who, whilst on a visit to England, stayed with Lady Lawford, in London. She only returned home a couple of weeks ago.15
  • 12 May 1931, KING—BUCKLEY.—The engagement is announced and the marriage will shortly take place, of Loloh, only child of Mr. and Mrs. R. G. King, Quiamong, Beaconsfield, Upper Victoria, and Charles, son of the late Mr. G. S. Buckley and Mrs. Buckley, of Camberwell, Melbourne.16
  • 21 May 1931, BUCKLEY-KING WEDDING
    The 1st Berwick Rangers and the 1st Beaconsfield Upper Guides formed a guard of honour for their captain Miss Jessie Langloh (Loloh) King, at her wedding yesterday afternoon at St John's Church, Upper Beaconsfield. The bride who is the only child of Mr and Mrs R G King, Quiamong, Upper Beaconsfield, was married to Charles Simmil, son of the late Mr G S Buckley and Mrs Buckley, Camberwell. The ceremony was performed by the Rev A J Cole. The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a picturesque gown of ivory ninon, the moulded bodice of which was allied to a long softly flowing skirt, which fell in trailing folds to form a train, with this a closely fitting ninin jacket was worn and dispensing with the usual veil the bride chose instead a charming lace Juliet cap with a spray of orange blossom at one side and a lovely bouquet of white autumn flowers was carried. The bridesmaids were Miss Sue Parker (cousin of the bride) and Miss Marjorie Good who wore long filmy frocks of mushroom pink ninon with short jackets of the same material; their quaint velvet bonnet-shaped hats were in a deeper tone than their frocks and bouquets of tawny chrysanthemums and autumn leaves har monised delightfully with this attractive colour scheme. Mr Roy Treloar was the best man and Mr Ralph Randell was the groomsman. After the ceremony Mr and Mrs King entertained their guests at wed ding tea at the Lakes Golf Club Beaconsfield. Those present included:—
    Mrs G S Buckley (mother of the bridegroom), Lady Lawford, Mrs Pomeroy Greene, Mr and Mrs H C Parker, Mrs and Miss Aitken, Mr and Mrs Andrew Chirnside, Miss Chirnside, Mr and Mrs Sidney Casey, Mr John Casey, Mrs and Miss Gurner, Mr and Mrs a'Beckett, Mr and Mrs Norman Barnett, Mr J Watt, Dr. and Mrs Hagenauer, the Misses M and Fairley Hagenauer, Mrs Grossman, Miss Panton, Mrs Turner Shaw, Miss Ada Armitage, Colonel and Mrs G H Knox, Judge and Mrs Bevan, Mr and Mrs Hurditch, Mr and Mrs Mc Bride, Mr and Mrs Francis, Mrs Becker (?), Mr and Mrs Pennefather, the Misses E and G Pennefather, Mr and Mrs L Nielsen, Mr and Mrs G ... Lyon, Mrs Eric Reid, Miss ... Reid, Captain and Mrs C H Read, Misses N and M McLean, Miss Armstrong, Mrs Charles Campbell, Mr and Mrs S A Greaves, Mrs A .... Mr E L T Armstrong, Mr E J Armstrong, Miss Perry, Mr P. Mcarthur, Mr and Mrs J W Anderson, Mr and Mrs S..., Miss G. ... , Mr and Mrs Bert Brock (?), Mr and Mrs H S..., and many others.17
  • 21 May 1931, A NUMBER of Melbourne folk are motoring up tomorrow for the wedding of Loloh King, only child of Mr and Mrs. R. G. King, which is to be celebrated at St. John's, Upper Beaconsfield, for the bride has many town friends. The lucky man is Mr Charles Simmil-Buckley, son of the late Mr G. S. Buckley and of Mrs Buckley, and will be attended by Mr Roy Treloar as best man. The bride will wear a lace Juliet cap with a trail of orange blos som, from, which will hang her filmy tulle veil over the ivory ninon gown. She has chosen mushroom pink for her bridesmaids, who are Sue Parker, a cousin, and Marjorie Good. Their vel vet shaped hats will be a tone deeper —all in keeping with the season, Rosalind! The bridal couple will pass through a guard of honor formed by the 1st Berwick Rangers and the 1st Beaconsfield Upper Guides, of which the bride is a popular captain. Mr and Mrs King will hold the reception at the Lakes Golf Club.18
  • 28 May 1931, Buckley-King: A VERY happy atmosphere surrounded the celebrations of Miss Jessie Langloh (Loloh) King's wedding to Mr Charles Simmil Buckley, for which many Melbourne friends motored up on Wednesday, May 20, to Upper Beaconsfield, where the picturesque ceremony was performed in St. John's Church.
    The bride is the only daughter of Mr and Mrs R. G. King, Upper Beaconsfield, and the bridegroom is the son of the late Mr. G. S. Buckley and of Mrs Buckley. The Rev. Cole officiated.
    Ivory ninon formed the charming bridal ensemble, which consisted of a closely-moulded frock flaring out at the hem-line and a smart jacket with tight wrist-length sleeves. A lace Juliet cap proved very becoming caught win, a posy of orange blossom at one side of the head. The bride carried a bouquet of cream roses and gladioli.
    The bridesmaids were Miss Sue Parker cousin of the bride, and Miss Marjorie Good, Walsh Street, South Yarra. Their pretty mushroom pink ninon frocks were worn with matching coatees and crivet bonnet-shaped hats in a deeper tone with which their bouquets, of chrysanthemums and autumn foliage harmonised.
    Mr Roy Treloar acted as best man, and Mr Ralph Randell as groomsman. After the ceremony, Mr and Mrs King entertained the guests at the picturesque Lakes Golf Club at Beaconsfield Upper, where the reception-rooms were bright with lovely autumn blooms and vivid foliage. The hostess was in all navy with a matching toque. The bridegroom's mother wore a well-cut coat and frock and a small hat of black ring velvet.
    As the bridal couple left the church they passed through a guard of honor formed by the 1st Berwick Rangers and the 1st Beaconsfield Upper Guides, of which the bride is captain.19
  • 28 May 1931, WEDDING. BUCKLEY—KING.
    The quaint little Church of England at Beaconsfield Upper made a pretty setting for the wedding Jessie Langlah (Lolah) King, only child of Mr. and Mrs. R. G. King, of “Quiamong,” Beaconsfield Upper, to Mr. Charles Simmil Buckley, eldest son of Mrs. G. S. Buckley, and the late Mr. Buckley, of “Zenda,” Camberwell. A bevy of the girl friends of the bride had decorated the rustic little church with masses of brown and dark colored chrysanthemums, Autumn leaves and coral fern, while suspended from the centre of the chancel arch hung a golden bell, picked out with crimson berries, and similar berries had been worked into horseshoes which adorned each side, and smaller bells were suspended from the gas brackets. The Rev. A. J. Cole performed the ceremony, and the bride, was given away by her father. Her beautiful wedding gown was composed of ivory crepe ninon. It had a fitting bodice, and inset angle length skirt, which fell with full flares, and had a French flounce panel drooping from the hip line and mingled with the back flares to form a short train. A soft bow was set in front of the waist line, and a gradu ated coatee of the ninon was also worn. Instead of the conventional veil the bride wore a Juliet cap of filmy ivory lace braiding, which ex tended over one ear, and was finished with a spray of orange blossom. Her bouquet of bridal roses, palest pink carnations and white gladioli made a lovely finish. Miss Sue Parker, of Hay, N.S.W. (cousin of the bride) and Miss Mar jorie Good (of South Yarra) were bridesmaids, and were attractively gowned in long frocks of pale mush room pink chiffon georgette. The close fitting bodices were cut with a deep V line, which at the back whs marked by a brilliant brooch, while in front the filmy fabric was crossed to the left side of the waist. The skirts clung closely, to the figure for a short distance from the waist line, and then fell away with soft fullness to their feet. Their cap-toques of velvet, in a deeper shade of dull rose, had a full bow over one ear, and their silken shoes were also in the darker shade. Sheaf bouquets of tawny colored flowers were carried. Mr. Roy Treloar was best man, Mr. Ralph L. Randell groomsman, and Mr. Jack Glismann usher.
    After the ceremony a reception was held by the bride’s parents, in the pretty club house at the Lakes Golf Club. Mrs. King wore a dark blue cloth coat over her matching crepe doria frock, which had beige ninon inlet on the bodice. Her hat was of lapis lazuli colored velour, and her posy was composed of tawny shaded chrysanthemums. Mrs. Buckley, who received with the host and hostess, wore a frock and coatee of black chiffon velvet. Her hat was of black velvet, and she carried a bouquet of red roses. Her niece, Miss Gill, also helped to receive the guests. Wedding tea-was served in the large club room, the tables being beautifully decorated with dark chrysanthemums, golden Iceland poppies and Autumn foliage. When leaving for the honeymoon the bride wore a mole colored tweed suit, with a parchment colored satin blouse, with a hat to match. The 1st Berwick Rangers and the 1st Beaconsfield Upper Girl Guides (of which the bride is captain), formed a guard of honor at the church and also at the golf house. Amongst the guests were Lady Lawford (cousin of bride), Mrs. Hubert Parker (Hay), Mrs. John Good, Miss Ada Armytage, Mr. and Mrs. Syd Casey, Mr. and Mrs, Andrew Chirnside, Miss Joan Chirn side, Mr. and Mrs. W. a’Beckett, Miss a’Beckett, Col. and Mrs. G. H. Knox, Mrs. Hagennaur, Misses M. and F. Hagennaur, Mrs. Charles Campbell, Mr. and Mrs. Bert Brown, Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Francis, Mr. and. Mrs. Hurditch, Mr. and Mrs. Glismann, Miss Glismann, Misses M. and N. McLean, Dr. Langmore, Mr. and Mrs. Les Knapton, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Smith, Miss Joyce Wilson, Dr. and Mrs. Griffiths, Mr. Peter McArthur, Mrs. Norman Barrett, Mrs. John Gurner, Miss Brenda Gurner, Mr. Jack Casey, Judge and Mrs. Bevan, Mr. Jim Watt, Mr. and Mrs. Pennefather.20
  • 7 Mar 1934, After the Polo. Many polo enthusiasts were present yesterday at a late afternoon party given at 1 Darling street by Mrs R G King, of Quiamong Upper Beaconsfield, and her daughter, Mrs Charles Buckley.
    Flowers in gay tints were arranged about the reception-rooms, and lilting music invited the younger guests to dance. Mrs King wore a suit of black suede-finished wool crepe and her little black hat had an eye-veil. Mrs Buckley's suit was in the new lichen green and she wore one of the picturesque ..mberess. When polo first became popular in Melbourne special tea parties at the Moonee Valley polo grounds were a regular feature of the March tournament, but in recent years these pleasant gatherings have been abandoned. It was, therefore especially delightful to find the "polo party" revived in a new guise, with the addition of cocktails and dancing.
    Among these invited were:—
    Mr Cecil Bray and Miss Phyllis Bray (Adelaide), Mr and Mrs Hugh Bullivant and Miss Biddy Bullivant (Wirringa, NSW), Mrs ton lill inn (?), Mr and Mrs A V Hisken, Mr and Mrs T Duncan, Lieut Colonel Knox, and Mrs Knox, Captain and Mrs C H Read, Mrs Alex Chomley and Miss K Chomley, Mr and Mrs Aitken, Mr John Gurner and Miss Brenda Gurner, Mr R O Blackwood, Miss Grizel Hamilton, Mr und Mrs Oscar Lempriere, Mr and Mrs Rodney Seagrave, Dr and Mrs Norman McArthur, Miss McArthur, Mr and Mrs James Bell (Albury), Mr and Mrs Reginald Boyd, Mr und Mrs J S Bloomfield, Mrs Hubert Parker, Miss Sue Parker Dr and Mrs Alan Mackay, Miss Deborah Hackett (Adelaide) Mr and Mrs Frank Faulkner, Mr Rupert Bunny, Miss G Pennefather, Mr and Mrs Finlay (Kyabram), Mr and Mrs S A Greaves, Mr Roy Treloar, Mrs Cedric Battle, Mr and Mrs W H Moule, Mrs Turner Shaw, Miss Mollie Turner Shaw, Mr and Mrs Sydney Casey, Dr und Mrs J A Gilruth, Mr and Mrs St J Somerset, Misses Gwenda and Mary Boyd, Mrs Norman McLean, Mr and Mrs Stanley Dobson, Dr and Mrs Gerald Weigall, Mrs Alex Sloane (Mulwala Station NSW), Mr and Mrs Rupert Greene, Mr P Warford Mein, Mr and Mrs Robert Bruce, Dr and Mrs Sidney Pern, Mr and Mrs Jim Leviny, Mr and Mrs J H Williams, Mr and Mrs Ernest Officer, Miss Peta Watson, Mr and Mrs A Robinson, Mr Norman Faulkner, Mr and Mrs Chopold Fink, Mr and Mrs L Keep, Mr and Mrs Weigall, Captain and Mrs G A Mansbridge, Mrs L P McBean, Mr and Mrs Warren Clark, Mrs Alison Clark, Mrs Eric Reid, Miss Alison Read (Berwick), Mrs John Good, Miss Ruth Good, Miss Patricia Clarke, Mr Anthony Clarke, Miss Doris Armytage, Mr J Armitage, Misses Ainslie Williams, Ivan Perry, Maisie Syme, Margaret and Joan Andrew Winney Peatder, Mollie and Eileen Finlay (Seymour).21
  • 19 Jun 1934, At the Alexandra Club yesterday Mrs R G King and Mrs Charles Buckley gave a small afternoon tea party to welcome relatives who are on a visit from Adelaide. The guests of honour were Mesdames W S Parker, W Rosenthal, Edgar Davidson and Hugh Davidson.22
  • 19 Jun 1935, Mrs R G King of Quiamong, Upper Beaconsfield, and her daughter, Mrs Charles Buckley, will leave by the Neptuna on June 25 for a visit to Hong Kong.23
  • 28 Jun 1935, SOCIAL NOTES: Mr. and Mrs. W. Anderson, of Kooringa, Marysville, Mr. and Mrs. Fleetwood, of the Western district, and Miss Fleetwood, Mrs. E. J. Jones, Dr. and Mrs. J. A. O'Brien, Mrs. R. G. King, of Upper Beaconsfield, and her daughter, Mrs. Charles Buckley, Mrs. G. L. Edwards, Mrs. G. E. Boyd, of Bacchus Marsh, and Miss G. J. Boyd, and Dr. and Mrs. N. V. McKenna are among the passengers who left by the m.v. Neptuna this week for a tour of the East. The Rev. and Mrs. F. G. Lewis are returning to Rabaul by the Neptuna.24
  • 3 Sep 1935, SOCIAL NOTES Mrs. R. G. King and Mrs. Charles Buckley have returned from a visit to Hong Kong. Mrs. King is staying at the Alexandra Club for a few days.25
  • 5 Jan 1939, COUNTRY HOLIDAYS. At Beaconsfield & Berwick.
    PICTURESQUE Upper Beaconsfield is undoubtedly feeling the effect of the dry season, and its usually attractive scenery has, like the rest of the countryside, changed from green to brown, while very few of the private gardens are flourishing. Even the few lucky people who still have spring water are using it sparingly, and water is being carted to Upper Beaconsfield. The difficulties created by the water shortage are reflected in the fact that there are fewer holiday makers in the district than in other years, but those who are there—and their number is not inconsiderable—are enjoying the rest and change, which this popular resort offers.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charles Buckley's home at "Quiamong" is a half-way house for visitors at any time, and those who have called in during the holidays have received the usual warm welcome. Mrs. Buckley has two polo ponies, Dinah and Lena (a half Arab), and two Irish Terriers, Pilot and Whiskers, to say nothing of the emu, who claims much of her attention when she is not entertaining visitors.26

Citations

  1. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D18449 age 65."
  2. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  3. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Ancestry.com. UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
  4. [S6] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Marriage Index Victoria 1921-1942.
  5. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 21 May 1931, p5.
  6. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "Death index only gives parents' initials."
  7. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  8. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 20 Aug 1969, p25, Funeral Notice 21 Aug 1969, p17.
  9. [S125] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1925.
  10. [S126] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1926.
  11. [S127] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1927.
  12. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  13. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  14. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk, 22 Mar 1928, p64.
  15. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk, 23 May 1929, p56
    " An attractive study of Lady Lawford, who, since her marriage, has made her home in England. Lady Lawford, who, before her marriage, was Miss Muriel Williams, paid a visit to her old home last year." (p55).
  16. [S14] Newspaper - Advertiser and Register (Adelaide), 12 May 1931.
  17. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 21 May 1931, p3.
  18. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk, 21 May 1931, p48.
  19. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk, 28 May 1931, p41.
  20. [S196] Newspaper - Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) "28 May 1931, p7."
  21. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 7 Mar 1934, p15.
  22. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 19 Jun 1934 p10.
  23. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 19 Jun 1935 p15.
  24. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 28 Jun 1935, p10.
  25. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 3 Sep 1935 p10.
  26. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 5 Jan 1939, p3.
Last Edited15 Apr 2016

Charles Simmill Buckley

M, #1056, b. 1890, d. 14 May 1966
Birth*1890 Port Albert, VIC, Australia, #B35277 [par George Simmill BUCKLEY & Isabella SCANLON].1 
Marriage*20 May 1931 Spouse: Jessie Langloh "Loloh" King. St John's Church, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, #M2404.2
 
Marriage-Notice*21 May 1931THE BRIDE'S GUARD OF HONOUR.-Members of the First Berwick Rangers and of the First Beaconsfield Upper Guides' Troop formed a picturesque guard of honour for their captain, Miss Jessie Langloh (Lola) King, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. G. King, of Beaconsfield, who was married yesterday to Mr. C. S. Buckley, son of Mrs. Buckley, of Camberwell, and the late Mr. G. S. Buckley, at St. John's Church, Upper Beaconsfield. Following the bridal couple are Miss Sue Parker (bridesmaid) and Mr. R. Treloar (best man), and Miss Marjorie Good (bridesmaid) and Mr. R. Randell (groomsman).3 
Death*14 May 1966 Mornington Bush Hospital, Mornington, VIC, Australia, #D9355 (Age 74) [par George BUCKELY & Isabelle SCANLON].4 
Death-Notice*16 May 1966BUCKLEY.—On May 14th, at the Mornington Bush Nursing Hospital, Charles Simmill of Caseta, Watts Road, Mount Eliza, beloved husband of Loloh and beloved son of the late George and Isabelle Buckley, formerley Camberwell.
The funeral of Mr CHARLES SIMMILL BUCKLEY will arrive at the Springvale Crematorium, TOMORROW (TUESDAY) at 11.20 am for a service to commence at 11.30 am.5 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1942Quiamong, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: chemist. With Jessie Langloh "Loloh" Buckley.6

Newspaper-Articles

  • 21 May 1931, A NUMBER of Melbourne folk are motoring up tomorrow for the wedding of Loloh King, only child of Mr and Mrs. R. G. King, which is to be celebrated at St. John's, Upper Beaconsfield, for the bride has many town friends. The lucky man is Mr Charles Simmil-Buckley, son of the late Mr G. S. Buckley and of Mrs Buckley, and will be attended by Mr Roy Treloar as best man. The bride will wear a lace Juliet cap with a trail of orange blos som, from, which will hang her filmy tulle veil over the ivory ninon gown. She has chosen mushroom pink for her bridesmaids, who are Sue Parker, a cousin, and Marjorie Good. Their vel vet shaped hats will be a tone deeper —all in keeping with the season, Rosalind! The bridal couple will pass through a guard of honor formed by the 1st Berwick Rangers and the 1st Beaconsfield Upper Guides, of which the bride is a popular captain. Mr and Mrs King will hold the reception at the Lakes Golf Club.7
  • 28 May 1931, Buckley-King: A VERY happy atmosphere surrounded the celebrations of Miss Jessie Langloh (Loloh) King's wedding to Mr Charles Simmil Buckley, for which many Melbourne friends motored up on Wednesday, May 20, to Upper Beaconsfield, where the picturesque ceremony was performed in St. John's Church.
    The bride is the only daughter of Mr and Mrs R. G. King, Upper Beaconsfield, and the bridegroom is the son of the late Mr. G. S. Buckley and of Mrs Buckley. The Rev. Cole officiated.
    Ivory ninon formed the charming bridal ensemble, which consisted of a closely-moulded frock flaring out at the hem-line and a smart jacket with tight wrist-length sleeves. A lace Juliet cap proved very becoming caught win, a posy of orange blossom at one side of the head. The bride carried a bouquet of cream roses and gladioli.
    The bridesmaids were Miss Sue Parker cousin of the bride, and Miss Marjorie Good, Walsh Street, South Yarra. Their pretty mushroom pink ninon frocks were worn with matching coatees and crivet bonnet-shaped hats in a deeper tone with which their bouquets, of chrysanthemums and autumn foliage harmonised.
    Mr Roy Treloar acted as best man, and Mr Ralph Randell as groomsman. After the ceremony, Mr and Mrs King entertained the guests at the picturesque Lakes Golf Club at Beaconsfield Upper, where the reception-rooms were bright with lovely autumn blooms and vivid foliage. The hostess was in all navy with a matching toque. The bridegroom's mother wore a well-cut coat and frock and a small hat of black ring velvet.
    As the bridal couple left the church they passed through a guard of honor formed by the 1st Berwick Rangers and the 1st Beaconsfield Upper Guides, of which the bride is captain.8
  • 28 May 1931, WEDDING. BUCKLEY—KING.
    The quaint little Church of England at Beaconsfield Upper made a pretty setting for the wedding Jessie Langlah (Lolah) King, only child of Mr. and Mrs. R. G. King, of “Quiamong,” Beaconsfield Upper, to Mr. Charles Simmil Buckley, eldest son of Mrs. G. S. Buckley, and the late Mr. Buckley, of “Zenda,” Camberwell. A bevy of the girl friends of the bride had decorated the rustic little church with masses of brown and dark colored chrysanthemums, Autumn leaves and coral fern, while suspended from the centre of the chancel arch hung a golden bell, picked out with crimson berries, and similar berries had been worked into horseshoes which adorned each side, and smaller bells were suspended from the gas brackets. The Rev. A. J. Cole performed the ceremony, and the bride, was given away by her father. Her beautiful wedding gown was composed of ivory crepe ninon. It had a fitting bodice, and inset angle length skirt, which fell with full flares, and had a French flounce panel drooping from the hip line and mingled with the back flares to form a short train. A soft bow was set in front of the waist line, and a gradu ated coatee of the ninon was also worn. Instead of the conventional veil the bride wore a Juliet cap of filmy ivory lace braiding, which ex tended over one ear, and was finished with a spray of orange blossom. Her bouquet of bridal roses, palest pink carnations and white gladioli made a lovely finish. Miss Sue Parker, of Hay, N.S.W. (cousin of the bride) and Miss Mar jorie Good (of South Yarra) were bridesmaids, and were attractively gowned in long frocks of pale mush room pink chiffon georgette. The close fitting bodices were cut with a deep V line, which at the back whs marked by a brilliant brooch, while in front the filmy fabric was crossed to the left side of the waist. The skirts clung closely, to the figure for a short distance from the waist line, and then fell away with soft fullness to their feet. Their cap-toques of velvet, in a deeper shade of dull rose, had a full bow over one ear, and their silken shoes were also in the darker shade. Sheaf bouquets of tawny colored flowers were carried. Mr. Roy Treloar was best man, Mr. Ralph L. Randell groomsman, and Mr. Jack Glismann usher.
    After the ceremony a reception was held by the bride’s parents, in the pretty club house at the Lakes Golf Club. Mrs. King wore a dark blue cloth coat over her matching crepe doria frock, which had beige ninon inlet on the bodice. Her hat was of lapis lazuli colored velour, and her posy was composed of tawny shaded chrysanthemums. Mrs. Buckley, who received with the host and hostess, wore a frock and coatee of black chiffon velvet. Her hat was of black velvet, and she carried a bouquet of red roses. Her niece, Miss Gill, also helped to receive the guests. Wedding tea-was served in the large club room, the tables being beautifully decorated with dark chrysanthemums, golden Iceland poppies and Autumn foliage. When leaving for the honeymoon the bride wore a mole colored tweed suit, with a parchment colored satin blouse, with a hat to match. The 1st Berwick Rangers and the 1st Beaconsfield Upper Girl Guides (of which the bride is captain), formed a guard of honor at the church and also at the golf house. Amongst the guests were Lady Lawford (cousin of bride), Mrs. Hubert Parker (Hay), Mrs. John Good, Miss Ada Armytage, Mr. and Mrs. Syd Casey, Mr. and Mrs, Andrew Chirnside, Miss Joan Chirn side, Mr. and Mrs. W. a’Beckett, Miss a’Beckett, Col. and Mrs. G. H. Knox, Mrs. Hagennaur, Misses M. and F. Hagennaur, Mrs. Charles Campbell, Mr. and Mrs. Bert Brown, Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Francis, Mr. and. Mrs. Hurditch, Mr. and Mrs. Glismann, Miss Glismann, Misses M. and N. McLean, Dr. Langmore, Mr. and Mrs. Les Knapton, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Smith, Miss Joyce Wilson, Dr. and Mrs. Griffiths, Mr. Peter McArthur, Mrs. Norman Barrett, Mrs. John Gurner, Miss Brenda Gurner, Mr. Jack Casey, Judge and Mrs. Bevan, Mr. Jim Watt, Mr. and Mrs. Pennefather.9

Citations

  1. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901.
  2. [S6] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Marriage Index Victoria 1921-1942.
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 21 May 1931, p5.
  4. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "Death index only gives parents' initials."
  5. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 16 May 1966, p23.
  6. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  7. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk, 21 May 1931, p48.
  8. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk, 28 May 1931, p41.
  9. [S196] Newspaper - Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) "28 May 1931, p7."
Last Edited15 Apr 2016

Alexander Rushall

M, #1057, b. 1870, d. 3 Dec 1926
Captain Alexander RUSHALL
(1870-1926)
Father*John Rushall b. 1823, d. 11 Feb 1857
Mother*Elizabeth Gower b. 1834, d. 30 Aug 1911

World War I

Alexander Rushall was part of the Melbourne Cavalry Corps which was raised in 1901. It was part of the 10th Light Horse. At that time he was the only appointed officer. In 1912 all six squadrons were united to become the 13th Light Horse, Victorian Mounted Rifles.
Captain Rushall lived at Langower (now the Kartoffelhaus), and regularly held camps on his property. He entertained local and Belgian touring cadets on numerous occasions.
Residence* "Langower", Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia. 
Military*Enlisted for military service: Roy Jamieson attended a cadet training corp at Captain Rushall's and went to England with him when the war broke out. 
Birth*1870 
Note*1901 The Melbourne Cavalry Corps was raised in 1901. As a volunteer corps, members provided their own uniforms, saddles and horses. Although also part of the Light Horse, when dressed in this uniform they took on ceremonial roles such as the Guard at the opening of Federal Parliament in Melbourne in 1901. Recruitment for this unit, particularly for officers was apparently slow. In 1901 Lieutenant A Rushall was the only appointed officer. The corps numbered only twenty until a fixed establishment of fifty was alloted in 1903. In 1903 the corps became part of No 6 Squadron 10th Light Horse Regiment. In 1912, all six squadrons of the 10th were united to become the 13th Light Horse, Victorian Mounted Rifles.1 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel10 Nov 1911 To Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Aeneas sailing from Fishguard
Age 40 - Australian Cadet Corp.2
(Witness) Probate (Will)6 Aug 1918Witnessed the will of Emma Shorthouse: buys part of GEM-D-2 in execution of probate.3 
Land-UBeac*2 Jun 1920 PAK-61 (part), Store. Transfer from Thomas Peter Krüss to Alexander Rushall. The store was burnt before Rushall's purchase - it appears that by 20 Dec 1921 the land was 1a 3r 37p (probably through roadworks.)4 
Land-UBeac*11 Jan 1924 GEM-D-2 (part). Transfer from Arthur William 'Boss' Shorthouse to Alexander Rushall. 3a 2r 1p.5 
Land-Note*11 Jan 1924 GEM-D-2 (part): Mortgagee: The State Savings Bank of Victoria. Mortgage taken over from Shorthouse - discharged 21 Apr 1928. Mortgagor was Alexander Rushall.6 
Land-UBeac*4 Jul 1924 PAK-66 l/p 1265 (part Lot 11). Transfer from Elizabeth Rushall to Alexander Rushall.7 
Death*3 Dec 1926 Caulfield, VIC, Australia, #D13236 age 56 [par John RUSHALL & Elizabeth GOWER].8 
Death-Notice*4 Dec 1926RUSHALL-On the 3rd December at 86 Hotham street, East St Kilda Captain Alexander Rushall (Inserted by a friend of long association, Elizabeth Tyack.)
RUSHALL-On the 3rd December, at 86 Hotham street, East St Kilda, Captain Alexander Rushall (Inserted by his affectionate niece Alice Bates.)
RUSHALL.-On the 3rd December at 86 Hotham street East St Kilda, Captain Alexander Rushall.
RUSHALL. - The Friends of the late Captain ALEXANDER RUSHALL are informed that his remains will be interred in the Brighton Cemetery.
The funeral is appointed to move from Christ Church, Acland street, St. Kilda, THIS DAY (Saturday, December 4), at conclusion of service commencing 3.40 o'clock, arriving at cemetery gates about 4.45 o'clock.9 
Land-Note1927 GEM-D-2 (part): In Alexander Rushall's probate this property containing 3a 2r 1p on which is erected a weatherboard store and dwelling was valued at £800. Rushall was renting it back to A W Shorthouse. The principal under mortgage was £326.9.4 at the time of Rushall's death. It appears that Shorthouse was behind in rent to Rushall, the rent was barely covering the outgoings (insurance & interest on mortgage).10 
Probate (Will)*3 Mar 1927 Alexander Rushall. Gent. East St Kilda. 03 Dec 1926. 214/239.10       
Land-Note*26 Sep 1927 Alexander Rushall died on 3rd December 1926. Probate has been granted to The Union Trustee Company of Australia Limited of Collins Street Melbourne.11 
Land-UBeac*9 May 1928 PAK-66 l/p 1265 (part Lot 11). Transfer from Alexander Rushall to Charles Louis Martel.12 
Land-UBeac*6 Sep 1928 GEM-D-2 (part). Transfer from Alexander Rushall to Stella Tryphena Thompson Denniston. SW part of land.13 
Land-UBeac*19 Oct 1928 GEM-D-2 (part). Transfer from Alexander Rushall to John Nathan. 2a 3r 10p.14 
Village Bell*Sep 2010The article reads: Alex Rushall – life member, philanthropist, mentor extraordinaire
One of the Upper Beaconsfield cricket Club’s very interesting life members was also the first. Designated Captain Alexander Rushall, he had membership bestowed upon him in 1922. Our minute book, which dates back to 1922, records that he donated crockery to the club and contributed three guineas (worth about $400 today). However this man, who owned Highland Park (now Glendower Restaurant) had an intriguing life.
Rushall established what could only be described as a private army in the post Federation period when Australia had no Commonwealth defence forces. Called the Melbourne Cavalry and Mounted Cadets, it had its own uniform as well as weapons. He organised three overseas trips to Europe and took 25 young cadets by ship to countries like Belgium, Italy, Switzerland and England. In 1914 war broke out while he was touring with one group, which ended up being seconded by the British war office to carry out secret war activities. David Jamieson’s father (Roy) was one such cadet. David used to live in Upper Beaconsfield and was one of our first oval maintenance men having regularly mowed our oval during the cricket season.
Rushall was associated as a businessman with architect F. W. Prell who built some of Melbourne’s most noteworthy buildings. He was also a life member of the Melbourne Swimming Club which later joined to form the Old Collegians Water Polo Club for which he was treasurer for six years. Apparently he had what could best be described as a ‘party trick’. He put on a costume, climbed into a sewn up bag and was dunked in a pool from which he later emerged in a completely different set of clothes – almost the same stunt as the Great Houdini.
Alexander Rushall established a fund to encourage boys to study for higher education. He set up a scholarship which is still available today. Males doing VCE can apply for this scholarship provided they intend going to university. It is worth $1 500 and has been available since Captain Rushall’s death in 1926.
Through the generosity of David Jamieson we will soon have an image of Alexander Rushall for our website. UBCC has been updating background info on its Life Members which now appears on our website at www.upperbeaconsfieldcc.com
The club is also committed to holding an annual Life Members Dinner and will do so not long after our 2010/11 season commences.15 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1903 - 190939 Robe Street, St Kilda, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: clerk. With Elizabeth Rushall and Albert Edward Ernest Rushall, Frederick William Rushall, 39 Robe Street St Kilda.16,17
191339 Robe Street, St Kilda, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: clerk. With Albert Edward Ernest Rushall and Frederick William Rushall.18
bt 1914 - 191739 Robe Street, St Kilda, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: clerk. With Albert Edward Ernest Rushall.19,20,21,22
191939 Robe Street, St Kilda, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: clerk.23
1924681 Inkerman Road, Caulfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: nil.24
192586 Hotham Street, St Kilda, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: nil.25

Newspaper-Articles

  • 10 Oct 1898, SWIMMING. The annual meeting of the Melbourne Swimming Club was held at St. Kilda on Friday evening; the president, Sir George Turner, in the chair. The following officers were elected:— Patron, Lord Brassey; President, Sir George Turner; vice-presidents, Messrs. E. L. Zox, M.L.A; W. T. Coldham, S. G. Pirani, J. G. Pearson, F. Wimpole. J. Woolf, R. S. Bradley, H. M. Gooch, E. J. Cordner, Val. Robertson; hon. medical officers, Drs. Schlesinger, M'Adam. M 'Mullen, Davenport and Power; treasurer, Alex. Rushall; captain, A. J. Pearson; vice-captain, M. Feldheim; judges, A. Watt, S. Fox; referee, J. J. Blake; starter, J. G. Pearson; committee, H. W. Hatch, M. Feldheim, A. Watt, J. J. Blake and S. Fox; delegate, E. Casper; Hon. instructors, A. Casper, J. G. Pearson, E. Casper, A. J. Pearson, M. Feldheim, Alex. Rushall, J. J. Blake; hon. instructors, life saving class, J. G. Pearson and J. Bertram; secretary, E. Casper; assistant secretary, A. Casper.26
  • 28 Jun 1900, The tickets for the Melbourne Swimming Club's ball on 30th July are going off most satisfactorily. The Military and Naval Commandants have issued an order that officers attending shall appear in full "mess" dress, and as a large attendance of officers is expected, this should help to make the ball a most brilliant function. Tickets may be obtained from the hon. secretary, Mr. Gerald R Blackbourne, and the hon. treasurer, Mr Alex Rushall.27
  • 14 Feb 1901, VOLUNTEER CAVALRY CORPS. - APPLICATIONS for ENROLMENT must be SENT IN on or before 14th February, 1901. Application forms and conditions may be obtained at Allan's, Collins-street. ALEX. RUSHALL, Box 78, G.P.O.28
  • 4 Mar 1901, THE NEW CAVALRY CORPS. At the beginning of the year a preliminary meeting, convened to consider a proposal to form a new cavalry corps, was held at the Port Phillip Club Hotel, under, the presidency of Mr. Knox, M.L.C. It was then resolved to ascertain what support might be relied upon, and also to approach Mr. M'Culloch, then Minister for Defence, and obtain official recognition for the corps. On Friday another meeting was held at the Port Phillip Club Hotel, when, about 60 persons attended. Mr. A. Rushall took the chair, and apologised for the unavoid able absence of Mr. Knox. It was announced that some 80 or 90 names had been received already, so that there will be no trouble in raising the first half-squadron. It is the intention of the committee to push on with the formation of the regiment, in order that it may take part in the celebrations to be held in honor of the arrival of the Heir Apparent to open the first Parliament of the Commonwealth.29
  • 23 Apr 1901, THE MELBOURNE CAVALRY. A NEW CORPS.
    The Melbourne Cavalry Corps, which was recently founded as a volunteer arm of the Victorian militia force, will be represented prominently in the forthcoming celebrations, a strong body of the cavalrymen being now available. There in a considerable percentage of trained soldiers in this corps, which includes several members of the old Rupertswood half-battery of Horse Artillery, and the new corps have already undergone a fair amount of drill. Colonel Tom Price, the commanding officer of the Victorian Mounted Rifles, has been appointed to the command also of the Melbourne Cavalry Corps. The uniform of the new corps consists of a blue tunic with yellow braid, blue riding pants with a yellow stripe, black boots, steel spurs, and white helmet, with a gilt spike. The troops will be armed with the cavalry sabre and carbine.30
  • 24 Dec 1901, MILITARY PROMOTIONS AND APPOINTMENTS.
    The following military appointments and promotions in the Victorian forces have been gazetted:— Appointments.— To be Lieutenants on Probation. Melbourne Cavalry: Alexander Rushall, to date from 24th November, 1901. The seniority of these officers will be determined on their passing the required examination for confirmation of commission.31
  • 24 Jan 1902, MELBOURNE CAVALRY.— Parade for inspection by officer commanding at 3 p.m. Saturday, 25th, at Show Grounds, Flemington. Dress: Drill order. Every member must attend. ALEX. RUSHALL, Lieut., 23/1/02. For O.C.M.G.32
  • 15 Mar 1902, A circular containing full particulars re cost of uniform &c., for intending recruits for the Melbourne Cavalry may be obtained at Allan's, Collins-street.33
  • 20 Mar 1902, MELBOURNE CAVALRY "SMOKER." - To celebrate the first anniversary of their first drill, the Melbourne Cavalry assembled in force at the Vienna Cafe, Collins-street, last night, to take part in a regimental "smoker." Colonel Tom Price, C.B., the acting Commandant, had promised to take the chair, but owing to a very severe cold which kept him indoors he was not able to be pre sent. Letters of apology were also read from Major Reade, C.B., of South Australia, and from other officers. Lieutenant Rushall, the senior officer of the corps, presided, and among those present were Dr. H. Strong and Mr. J. S. Gordon. The chairman announced amid cheers that after looking into their case General Hutton had decided that the corps should be allowed to go on. Cavalry, the G.O.C. held, were the "eyes and ears of the army" ; and the Melbourne corps, which was to be trained specially in the use of the rifle, as well as the sabre, would prove useful in those capacities. The corps, the chairman pointed out, had held 60 dismounted parades during the year, and had put in six days under canvas. They had had to encounter a lot of opposition, but with the countenance of the G.O.C. their prospects were bright. (Cheers.) Among those contributing to a capital programme of songs, selections and recitations were Messrs. H. S. Dickson, E. A. Ure, G. Wattmuff, J. S. Gordon. A. Anderson, W. Elder and E. Nathan. A pleasant and successful evening closed with the usual compliments.34
  • 13 May 1903, A detachment of the Melbourne Cavalry, under Lieutenant Rushall, went through some musketry shooting at 300 and 400 yds. at Port Melbourne on Saturday, some of the members showing improving form.35
  • 25 May 1903, THE Members of Melbourne Cavalry are respectfully requested to attend the funeral of their late corporal, ANDREW S. SHARP, THIS DAY. Parade at Jolimont railway station at 2.40 p.m. Dress-Review order, great coat, sword. ALEX. RUSHALL, Lieutenant O.C. Melbourne Cavalry.
    SHARP.-The Friends of the late Corporal ANDREW STORRIER SHARP (Melbourne Cavalry Corps) are informed that his remains will be interred in the Melbourne General Cemetery.
    The funeral will leave Inveresk, Jolimont, THIS DAY (Monday, the 25th inst.), at 3 p.m. Military funeral. A A. SLEIGHT, Undertaker.36
  • 19 Jun 1903, MELBOURNE CAVALRY CORPS. AN EXTRAORDINARY POSITION.
    The members of the Melbourne Cavalry Corps complain that it does not pay to be a volunteer. It is two and a half years since permission was given by the then Premier of Victoria (Sir George Turner) to organise the corps, its strength being limited to 50 men. The corps was formed; the men found their own horses, saddlery and uniforms, the Government providing only swords and rifles; a private drill room was engaged at the expense of the corps, also a competent drill instructor; and now, after expending £1200 on equipment (irrespective of horses) and the attainment of a high standard of proficiency in drill, the men find themselves with only one officer. All efforts to obtain the appointment of the other two to which they are entitled have failed. Although during its existence the corps has held seven camps and route marches — each of the latter extending over three or four days— it has not yet been given a fixed establishment. The sole officer was only appointed after a special appeal from the members of the corps. The other two can didates for commissions have been waiting nearly two years. Their appointment was authorised in July, 1901, when an order stating that the vacancies existed was issued, signed by Colonel Price. The following month the two candidates for com missions were told to take their places as acting officers, for they had passed meritorious examinations and were absolutely efficient. Acting officers they have been ever since, and now a communication has been received from head quarters stating that no authority exists for their appointment. The solitary officer being unable to attend the last Easter encampment, the men went into camp under their medical officer! The members of the corps feel that they have not merely been neglected, but snubbed, and have come to the conclusion that they are to be discouraged to the point of disbanding. For what reason they can not divine. They have striven, without sparing time or money, to make their corps efficient in musketry and mounted drill, and on various occasions the G.O.C. Com monwealth Military Forces has expressed his satisfaction with their appearance and work done, both on parade and in camp. As citizen soldiers the men are still keen in spite of treatment which they cannot understand.37
  • 25 Sep 1903, THE MELBOURNE CAVALRY. THEIR POSITION DEFINED.
    The Melbourne Cavalry corps was inspected at the instruction hall at the Barracks last evening by the Commandant of the Victorian forces, Brigadier-General Gordon, accompanied by Lieutenant-Colonel Les. After the inspection the Commandant, addressing Lieutenant Rushall, the commanding officer, and the members of the corps, fully explained the object of and constitution of the new organisation of the forces, more particularly as regarded the Light Horse of Australia. He dispelled the idea of any intention of destroying the identity of this corps. On the contrary, the Commandant rather commended the spirit of the corps to be known by a distinctive name. Generically, all the mounted men would be known as the Light Horse, but particularly the corps would be known as the 6th squadron, "Melbourne Cavalry," 10th Regiment, 4th Light Horse Brigade. It was further pointed out that the training of the Light Horse of the Commonwealth was to be of a very high und progressive standard. Regarding the point raised that this small unit did not desire to receive the emoluments allowed to the whole of the Light Horse of the Commonwealth, and that it wished to remain a purely volunteer force, the Commandant pointed out that everyone serving his Majesty the King was a volunteer, serving, no doubt, under dif ferent conditions, but still maintaining that privilege which belonged to all British subjects. The question of the actual value of that emolument was not the point at issue. What was absolutely necessary was that the same amount of training under exactly similar conditions should be carried out through all units belonging to each branch of the service; and if it were to be allowed for a minute that any one unit should be treated differently from any other unit, the principles guiding organisation were at once destroyed. The corps must be under the same discipline as the other corps, and the regulations did not require the members to put in more days at drill than at present. Furthermore, that the regulations made provision to meet the case of those who could not, through business obligations, be able to undergo the eight days' continuous drill required in every year. There was no objection to the corps retaining its present uniform, and it was desired that it should continue to be the model mounted corps of the State.38
  • 15 Jan 1904, The annual smoke concert of the Melbourne Cavalry (6th squadron 10th Australian Light Horse) was held in the Vienna Cafe last night, and in spite of the rain there was a large attendance of officers of the various branches of the service and others. Lieutenant Rushall presided, and among those present were Captain Collins (secretary Defence department), Colonel Lee, A.A.G. (representing Brigadier-General Gordon); Colonel Otter, Lieutenant-Colonel Hughes and Major Patterson, D.A.Q.M.G. The toast of the Visitors was responded to by Captain Collins and Colonel Lee, who wished the cavalry success, and expressed the hope that it would soon be brought up to its full strength. Colonel Lee proposed the toast of the Cavalry, which was responded to by the chairman. During the evening a programme of musical selections and recitations was rendered, Mr. Claude Hall, Mr. Weston Pett, Lieutenant Gordon, Captain Mackenzie, Mr. Alfred Allen, Mr. E. H. Ure and the Zingarie Orchestra being among the contributors.39
  • 2 Feb 1904, UPPER BEACONSFIELD - Great excitement was caused here on Saturday morning by the arrival of a troop of the Melbourne Cavalry, under the command of Lieutenant Rushall. Tents were pitched on Mr Rushall's paddock, and the men soon settled down to their military duties. On Sunday the camp was inspected by a large number of visitors. In the evening there was a church parade and 40 men attended service in the Beaconsfield Assembly hall. To-day the troops were on outpost duty watching for an attack from an enemy supposed to be approaching from Gembrook .40
  • 5 Feb 1904, A three days' camp, commencing on Saturday last, was held in the Beaconsfield district, the troops consisting of a detachment of the Melbourne Cavalry under Lieutenant Rushall and a detachment of Mounted Rifles under Captain Merritt and Captain Strong. Warrant Officer Algie and Sergeant-Major Lewis, of the instructional staff, attended the camp and gave valuable instruction in the work of outpost duty, attack, defence and screening. On the concluding day (Monday), the cavalry took up a position of defence, and were attacked, by the Mounted Rifles. On the march to the railway station in the afternoon the positions were reversed, the Mounted Rifles acting as a rear guard and being at tacked and pursued by the cavalry. Both officers and men took a keen interest in the work done during the three days. Lieutenant R. H. Strong (medical officer) and Veterinary-Lieutenant Wilson were attached to the cavalry, and their services were employed in attending to several minor casualties affecting both men and horses. Lieutenant Gregory and Lieutenant Hoad were attached to the Mounted Rifles for instruction.41
  • 21 Feb 1905, The Melbourne Cavalry held a small camp on Saturday, Sunday and yesterday, at Beaconsfield. Attack, defence, skirmishing and camp routine formed the work, which was carried out in excellent style. It is intimated in our advertising columns that the cavalry requires recruits. One of the chief conditions is that each candidate must have a suitable horse at his disposal, in respect of which a liberal allowance is made.42
  • 25 Feb 1905, MELBOURNE CAVALRY. VACANCIES For FEW RECRUITS, Apply Drill Roam, Howe-crescent, South Melbourne. ALEX. RUSHALL. Lt. Comdg. 31 Queen-street, 24th February, 1905.43
  • 19 Jun 1905, The military displays were also highly effective. There was a great quarter staff contest between Sergeants Meates and Thomas; a fight for the colors, under the direction of Captain Rushall (Melbourne Cavalry), in which Zulus, cavalry and Highlanders take part; and a military sham fight, carried out by the Melbourne Cavalry, R.A. Artillery, Australian En gineers, Scottish regiment, Army Medical Corps and Senior Cadets.44
  • 25 Oct 1905, Berwick Shire Council: Correspondence: From Alex Rushall, Upper Beaconsfield, to the effect that transfer of land was being prepared.--Received45
  • 31 Oct 1905, GOVERNMENT NOTICES, MELBOURNE CAVALRY. NAVAL and MILITARY TOURNAMENT. EXHIBITION, THURSDAY EVENING, 9th NOVEMBER. First Heats of TUGS of WAR (8 Per Team). First Heats of TENT PITCHING and STRIKING (5 Per Team)- First Heats of ALARM and RUSH (8 Per Team). ROYAL AUSTRALIAN ARTILLERY DRIVING COMPETITIONS. MASSED BANDS. DISPLAYS by- 1. ENGINEERS. 2. VICT. SCOTTISH REGT. 3. MELBOURNE CAVALRY. Other Displays (as may be detailed). BATTLE SCENE — ALL ARMS. SATURDAY AFTERNOON, 18th NOVEMBER. MOUNTED EVENTS: Jumping in Sections, &c. Tent Pegging. Gretna Green Race. Victoria Cross Race. Heads and Posts. Australian Field Artillery Driving Competi tions. Obstacle Race. Menagerie Race (post entries will be received for this event only). SATURDAY EVENING, 18th NOVEMBER. MASSED BANDS. Finals of all Dismounted Events. Displays by Naval Forces. Balance of Displays. Australian Field Artillery Harnessing, &c., Competition. Mounted Melee. Mounted Tugs of War. Inter-State Mounted Tug of War. Battle Scene—All Arms. ENTRIES CLOSE at Orderly Room, Howe-crescent, South Melbourne, on THURSDAY, 2nd NOVEMBER. CADET COMPETITION IS CANCELLED. ALEX. RUSHALL, Capt., O.C. Melbourne Cavalry.46
  • 20 Apr 1906, A LONG FAST. INCIDENT OF THE EASTER EXERCISES.
    The Melbourne cavalry were, during the sham fighting last Sunday and Monday, forced to undergo an exercise which, how ever valuable as an illustration of the hard ships met with in real warfare, is certainly open to very grave objection. Thirty men, under the command of Captain Rushall, were compelled to go without food for nearly 30 hours, and their horses were sub jected to a like barbarity. The Melbourne cavalry is permanently attached under the mobilisation scheme to the forts at the Heads. The 30 men were sent to do out post duty on Sunday night. The evening meal was served at 5 o'clock, and the horses were fed at the same time. An order was issued before the troops left camp that they were to return by 9 o'clock next morning. The commanding officer was returning in accordance with this order, when a "galloper" arrived and told him to go back at once to his post and remain there till further orders. The result of the further orders was that they did not return till 3.15 p.m. on Monday. They were immediately entrained for Melbourne, and reached the city at 9.30 p.m., no food having been issued to men or horses since 5 p.m. on Sunday, a period of 28½ hours. Some time of course, elapsed between the hour the train reached the station and the time when food was available. On arrival at their destination, the men formally requested to be paraded before their com manding officer, and complained of their treatment. The incident is to form the subject of an official inquiry. It will gene rally be admitted that too high a develop ment of realism in sham fights is fraught with disastrous possibilities.47
  • 21 Apr 1906, An inquiry is to take place in connection with the experience of a squadron of 30 men of the Melbourne Cavalry, who are al leged to have been kept on outpost duty for 30 hours during the recent manoeuvres at Queenscliff. It is stated, however, that it was competent for the officer in charge of the squadron to have detailed a few men to fetch rations and fodder for the soldiers and their horses. There is said to have been an ample supply for all on duty. Lieutenant-Colonel Hall is to report to Colonel Ricardo, the State Commandant, on the whole business.48
  • 10 Jul 1907, THE MILITARY ARRANGEMENTS. The Melbourne Cavalry, under Captain Rushall, will furnish the escort to his Excellency the Lieutenant-Governor at the opening of the State Parliament to-day. The R.A.A. and band under Major Dangar will provide the guard of honor outside Par liament House, and the salute will be fired from the Domain battery by the R.A.A. under Lieutenant Hurst.49
  • 7 Jan 1908, NAVAL AND MILITARY. MOUNTED CADETS' CAMP.
    DANDENONG, Monday.-On Sunday night a detachment of some 30 mounted cadets affiliated with the Melbourne Mounted Rifles, reached Dandenong, en route for Mentone, in charge of Captain Rushall, after having spent a week in camp at Beaconsfield, where they were instructed in cavalry exercises, tent pitching, stable drill, etc., besides making marches to Tooradin and other places. Captain Rushall expresses himself as well pleased with the efficient manner in which the lads, who are all under 18, performed their duties. One little fellow was in the ambulance waggon, owing to the extreme heat, but the others were in splendid fettle.50
  • 14 Mar 1908, AN OFFICER'S RESIGNATION. Captain Alexander Rushall, the officer commanding the Melbourne Cavalry, has marked his resignation from the military forces by the issue of an explanatory letter, dated 5th March, com plaining of the injustice of a regulation which requires him to be "seconded" from his regiment if he desires also to command a squadron of mounted cadets. Captain Rushall quotes a long letter sent to the Minister of Defence on the subject of his grievance, and proceeds: — It is not to be expected that the Minister has sufficient time to deal with every little matter that arises, but as this matter is apparently not of sufficient importance for the department to deal with, I have decided that it is misplaced energy on my part to devote any further time or money to the forces. The all-absorbing question now appears to be compulsion; the volunteer movement is therefore apparently ignored. I might state that in my opinion if the cadet service were made compulsory, especially the senior cadets (which include naval, mounted and infantry), there would be no occasion to take the drastic measures proposed for the compulsion of the adults to leave their trades and callings for 18 days' continuous training a year.51
  • 12 Dec 1908, MOUNTED Cadets Parade, 3.15 p.m., Avenue, bring lances. Alex. Rushall, Cap., O.C.52
  • 4 Feb 1909, CAVALRY in camp. BEACONSFIELD UPPER Tuesday - The Melbourne Cavalry were camped at Beaconsfield Upper from Saturday to Monday. "Langower", the country residence of Captain Rushall, is an ideal military camping ground. The country around, scarred in all directions by deep gullies, with vast stretches of rugged forest, affords a good training ground for cavalry manoeuvres. On Monday attacking and defending a position provided some good solid work both for officers and men. A church parade was held on the grounds on Sunday, when Captain Kelly, precentor of St Paul's Cathedral, officiated, the band leading the musical part of the service. Captain Rushall was in command, the other officers present being Lieutenants Armstrong, Buchan, Montgomery, and Roberts.53
  • 1 Jul 1909, STATE PARLIAMENT. Opening the session. THE VICE-REGAL CEREMONY. The guard of honor was furnished hy the permanent naval and land military forces, the naval section being in charge of Lieutenant Warren, and the military section in charge of Captain Brown. The escort was supplied by the Melbourne Cavalry, under the command of Captain Rushall. The band of the naval forces provided the necessary music. They all made a goodly show in the winter sunshine as they paraded in the Exhibition Gardens.54
  • 28 Oct 1909, EXHIBITION BUILDING, GREAT CHARITY-TATTOO, SATURDAY, 6th NOVEMBER, - In Aid of The CARLTON REFUGE. - (including) MELBOURNE CAVALRY, Under. Cpt. Rushall. AUTOMOBILE CLUB of VICTORIA, In a BRILLIANT SPECTACLE.55
  • 3 Nov 1909, The vice-regal parties. The escorts, both for the Governor-Gene ral and the State Governor, were furnished by the Melbourne Cavalry, with Captain Ritshall in command.56
  • 15 Nov 1909, On Saturday afternoon a squadron, comprised of a portion of the 10th A.L.H., better known as the Melbourne Cavalry, and a number of mounted cadets, the total being about 120, under, the command of Captain Rushall, passed through Coburg en route to camp near Heidelberg. The newly formed Coburg troop of mounted cadets was drawn up to receive them at the town hall, in Bell-street, and the Boys' Brass Band, Coburg Naval Cadets, and a gather ing of residents, headed by the mayor and councillors, were present. The mayor welcomed the Melbourne Cavalry and mounted cadets, and thanked Major Carroll, as re presenting the military authorities, for pay ing Coburg a visit. The mayor then formally handed over the Coburg troop to the com mand of Captain Rushall, who promised to look after them well, and the march to Heidelberg was resumed amidst the cheers of the assemblage.57
  • 2 Feb 1910, CAVALRY IN CAMP. BEACONSFIELD, Tuesday.-The Melbourne Cavalry was encamped at "Langower," Beaconsfield, from January 29 to 31. The men, under the command of Captain Rushall, and accompanied by the newly formed Cavalry Band, marched up from the railway station, and at once settled down to camp duties. The same night a line of outposts was taken up, and attacked just before midnight. On Sunday no parades we're held, nor instructions given, owing to a regulation that all Sunday work was prohibited. This regulation may eventually prove to be inadvisable, as it would appear to be better to work the men for at least some portion of the day. A church service, conducted by Dr. Gosman, was held in the afternoon, at which a large number of residents were present, the music being led by the band. On Monday reveille was sounded at half-past 5, when attack and defence were carried out. Later, a strong position was taken up, and attacked by half the squadron. The country was very rugged and difficult, providing good exercise for the men. An advance and rear-guard action took place during the afternoon, and the corps returned to Melbourne by the 9 p.m. train.58
  • 12 Feb 1910, COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE. ... MELBOURNE CAVALRY.-Musketry, Table B, To-day, Williamstown, 2.20 train. (Sgd.) Alex. Rushall, Capt. Cmdg.59
  • 22 Feb 1910, CADETS FOR ABROAD.
    WORLD'S TOUR CONTEMPLATED. AN IMPORTANT PROPOSAL.
    Captain Rushall, officer commanding the Melbourne Cavalry and the Mounted Cadets, and an organising com mittee of officers, have in hand a scheme for organising a troop of Australian mounted cadets to travel to the United Kingdom and Europe. In a circular which Captain Rushall has forwarded to the head masters of colleges and schools and cadet officers, he states that it is con sidered that a trip organised on the lines set out will give an opportunity for lads to go who would not be allowed by parents to do so unless they were under proper con trol and subject to discipline as this ex pedition would be. Facilities, he says, will also be given for cadets to see more in the naval, military aud manufacturing circles than any private individual could expect to, in the various places visited.
    The circular proceeds:— "It is hoped that those attending will, when they return, be of service to the great Australian cadet system to be organised under the Defence Bill. As to the trip as a great source of instruction, and from a health point of view, it is deemed unnecessary to make any comment here. It is proposed to limit the number to one section (that is four cadets) from each State. It is not neces sary that the lads should be at present in the forces, provided they can ride and comply with the following conditions:-- Age.— -From 15½ and under 18 years. Height.— About 5 feet 4½ inches to 5 feet 8 inches. Physical Development. — Must be strong, sturdy lads. Medical certificate to be furnished. Certifi cate must be supplied that teeth have been pro perly attended to before starting. Character.— Must furnish a certificate of good behavior, and good disposition, from a school mas ter or cadet officer. Qualifications— Cadet must be able to ride well — should understand shooting, swimming, and be generally good at athletics. "Time of Departure. — It is proposed to leave Melbourne, if possible, by Orient steamcr Otway, 20th April; and return by White Star liner, leaving London, 28th July. "Route. — Via Colombo, Suez Canal and disembark at Naples. Then by Rome, Venice, Switzerland, France, and make a short stay at Paris, thence to London, Re turn via South Africa. "Trips. — Trips will be arranged to visit Scotland. Ireland, and to go to Belgium (to Waterloo, &c.), Berlin. Arrangements will be made, if possible, to attend any

    manoeuvres in England. Also to attend and take part in the Great Empire Car nival, which is being organised by Lord Roberts, and all the leading people of the United Kingdom. "Horses. — Horses and saddlery, when re quired, will be arranged for in England. "Officers. — At least one (probably more) of the cavalry officers will accompany the troop. Officers will travel with the lads in the same class in boats and train. The senior officer to have complete control of the expedition. "Travelling— The Orient Company guar antees good accommodation and plenty of good food during the voyage. "Expense.— As it is proposed to limit the troop to so small a number as four from each State, it is anticipated that no diffi culty will be experienced in getting sufficient who are willing to pay their own ex penses (as the 140 Western Australian lads did in the recent trip). "The following will be required: — Fare from Australian ports (except Queensland) to Naples, and overland via Rome, &c., Switzerland, France, and return by White Star line via South Africa £40 Time on Continent and United Kingdom, 8 weeks estimated at full, for beds and meals, at 2 guineas, say .... 17 Fares for trips United Kingdom, &c. (these have already been properly worked out) .. 18 Incidental expenses .. . 5 Total amount per head £80 "The fares will be paid in Melbourne for both journeys before starting. The other amounts will be forwarded to a bank in London, and operated on by officers com manding. It is not proposed to ask for any Government or outside monetary as sistance. There will be no necessity to ex ceed the amount set out above. Particular attention will be paid to this, as it is de sired that the expenses should not become prohibitive. If another four weeks were added to the stay in the United Kingdom, &c., it would cost about £12 more (prob ably less). "Kit.— A kit will be required, details of which will be forwarded on receipt of the names of those willing to go, and the cost of same will be kept down to as low a figure as possible." Captain Rushall asks the governing bodies of the institutions he has circularised to forward as early as possible the names of cadets who would be prepared to make the trip, as no time must be lost in mak ing the arrangements.60
  • 4 Mar 1910, CADETS FOR ABROAD. PROPOSED WORLD'S TOUR. Considerable progress has been made by Captain Rushall, officer commanding the Melbourne Cavalry and the Mounted Cadets, and the committee of officers which is organising a scheme for taking a troop of Australian mounted cadets to travel to the United Kingdom and Europe. The response from Victorian lads has been very satisfactory, but the prospects of the numbers from other States are not encouraging, although there has been some delay in circulating the notices. It is expected that within the next few days sufficient names will have been sent in to have the matter finally dealt with by the military authori ties. This scheme affords parents an opportunity to send their sons away knowing that they will be under strict discip line and will be well looked after. It also gives the lads an opportunity of seeing the British army, or portion of it, in training, and the great naval dockyards, &c. Full particulars can be obtained from Captain Rushall, 31 Queen-street.61
  • 30 Mar 1910, A COMBINED CAMP. CAVALRY AND CADETS.
    BEACONSFIELD UPPER, Tuesday. The Melbourne Cavalry and Mounted Cadets left Melbourne on Thursday night, and proceeded by the main Gippsland road via Berwick and Beaconsfield Ranges to the Gembrook district, a base being established at Beaconsfield Upper. On Thursday night the squadrons took up a line of outposts at Oakleigh, and at dawn on Friday moved forward as an advance guard. At the next halt at Beaconsfield, the outpost line was again established, and on Saturday the whole body attacked a position which was strongly held on the Gembrook railway. A scheme was laid down before leaving the city, and was adhered to strictly.
    On Sunday the usual camp duties were performed, and a church service was held, at which a large number of people attended. The Rev James Wilson of Beaconsfield conducted the service, and gave an appropriate address to the men, at the same time wishing God-speed to the officers and mounted cadets who are shortly to visit England. The band was in attendance and led the music. On Monday the reveille sounded long before daylight, and by 8 a m the camp was struck, and the troops set out over the ranges for Melbourne. Captain Rushall was in command, with Captain G M'Coll as staff officer, the other officers being Lieutenants Armstrong, Buchan, Montgomery, Thornton, and Lalor.
    The squadrons by the time they have returned will have covered a distance of about 120 miles. The health conditions of the men and horses were good, and the cadets did not appear to be the least exhausted by their long marches.62
  • 9 Apr 1910, CADETS FOR ABROAD - AN UNFORTUNATE HITCH. QUESTION OF MILITARY SANCTION. OFFICIAL APPROVAL WITHHELD.
    A hitch has occurred in the arrangements for the despatch of a troop of mounted cadets on a world's tour, beginning on 18th May. The list of names of the cadets who were prepared to make the tour was published last week, and pro vision was made for depositing the whole of the expenses of the tour before the troops left on H.M.S. Orvieto. The approval of the military authorities had been sought, so that the boys might have permission to wear uniform where and when required, as it was their desire to attend camps of training in England. They also desired a letter of introductiou from the Government to the High Commissioner. It is alleged by the military authorities, though denied in other quarters, that most of the arrangements were complete before the military people were invited to sanc tion the scheme. Whether or not this factor has entered into the military board's mind in coming to a decision is uncertain, but the board at any rate determined that it would not be a wise thing for the Government to identify itself in any way with the movement. In arriving at the decision, they had in mind the experience of the American boys, who were stranded in Australia a few months ago, and they did not deem it advisable that any boy tourists from Australia should be placed in a similar position. The Minister of Defence, it is stated, has approved of the recommendation of the board. This decision was communi cated to Captain Rushall, who is still in negotiation with the department, in the hope that it will rescind its determination. When the matter was brought under his notice yesterday the Prime Minister said it had not been referred to him in any way, but if the Military Board was not prepared to give its approval to the tour, the reason no doubt would be that it did not desire a repetition of the experience of the American boys. It might be pointed out, however, that there would be no likelihood of the Aus tralians having such an experience, as before they left Australia the passage money for both voyages would be paid at the shipping company's office, and the balance of the moneys that would be required for their upkeep when abroad would be lodged in a Melbourne bank, to be remitted to London, where it could be operated upon only by the officer in charge. All the boys who had notified their intention of making the tour have served in the cadet forces of the different States, and their parents had guaranteed to bear the cost of the trip. Before the date of the Orvieto's departure, it is believed that a strong effort will be made to induce the military authorities to officially approve of the trip; otherwise, it must be abandoned as a tour of Australian cadets, as they will be unable to wear their cadet uniform, or participate in any military movement, without first obtaining the approval of the Commonwealth military authorities.63
  • 8 Oct 1910, THE MOUNTED CADETS. A PUBLIC "WELCOME HOME."
    A large and fashionable audience assem bled last night at Prahran town hall to welcome the mounted cadets who have just returned from a tour of the world. The reception took the form of a concert, interspersed with addresses of welcome by his Excellency the State Governor, the Lieutenant-Governor and a represen tative of the Commonwealth Govern ment. The cadets were individually presented to the Governor. A concert programme was arranged by Madame Lena Conly. The Melbourne Cavalry Band, under Mr. E. Code, rendered appropriate music, and pleasant speeches, welcoming the lads back to Melbourne, were delivered by Sir Thomas Carmichael and Sir John Madden; and Mr. F. Tudor, on behalf of the Commonwealth Government, tendered thanks to the consuls of Switzerland, France, Italy and last, but not least, the United States of America, for the handsome way their boys were treated in their respective countries. The Gover nor then prcsenptcd Captain A. Rushall, the initiator of the tour, with a gold watch, on behalf of the parents of the returned cadets.64
  • 24 Nov 1910, A MILITARY MYSTERY. Command of the Melbourne Cavalry. Sequel to the Cadets' tour.
    A strong feeling of dissatisfaction has been aroused amongst members of the Melbourne Cavalry by certain unexpected changes which have been effected in con nection with the command of the squadron. The cavalry is undoubtedly a most useful branch of the land forces of Victoria. The trouble which has arisen and its real causes are veiled in deep mystery, as strict reticence is maintained. From what is ascertainable through independent channels, however, it appears that with a few of those set in high authority the Mel bourne Cavalry is, and has been ever since its formation, about ten years ago, a bete noire. Its success has never been to this small section a cause for rejoicing, but by a policy of passive resistance its advance ment been invariably blocked, and its officers have been in a military sense, cold- shouldered. At the establishment of the squadron its command was vested in Captain Rushall, an officer, who was indefatigable in his efforts in its behalf, he was primarily instrumental also in effecting more recently the establishment of the mounted cadets. Early in the present year a movement was started with the object of despatching on a tour abroad a number of these lads. The whole of the expenses were to be borne by the parents of the boys, and in order to facilitate their movements, and to enable them the better to take full advantage of the opportunities afforded for acquiring in formation as to military methods in other countries, the local authorities were asked to officially recognise the scheme. Their attitude towards the project was first dis closed in a paragraph which was published in the press in which it was stated that the desired approval could not be given, the authorities fearing that the lads might be "stranded like the American boys." The thinness and insufficiency of this reason was made patent when the father of one of the boys offered to lodge a cheque for a substantial amount as a safeguard against such a very remote contingency. The ob jection, although somewhat modified, was not entirely withdrawn, and the cadets left and returned practically under a dark offi cial cloud. During the negotiations preliminary to the departure of the lads, Captain Rushall acted as intermediary between the military authorities and the parents of the cadets, and after the announcement in the press referred to above he at the request of the parents of the boys, conveyed to them the contents of the official document notifying the refusal to recognise the tour. It now appears that his action in so doing has been made the excuse for divesting him of his command and for placing him on the officers' reserve list, a rather drastic step, which was taken recently. The facts, as far as they can be definitely stated, certainly lend color to the idea that unnecessarily harsh measures have been adopted, and it is questionable whether such tactics make for efficiency in the defence forces of the Commonwealth. At any rate the officer who has been so treated is entitled to know the real reason for his treatment, and should, in fairness, be afforded an opportunity to make known his defence. This so far has been denied him, but the matter, it is understood, is still under the consideration of the officials.65
  • 5 Dec 1910, THE MELBOURNE CAVALRY. Arrangements are being made for a public meeting, to be held at the Melbourne Town Hall, to ventilate the trouble which has arisen in connection with the Melbourne Cavalry. It is understood that the parents of those Mounted Cadets who took part in the recent world's tour are preparing a petition urging the authorities to make a thorough inquiry as to the reasons which led to Captain Rushall being placed on the officers' reserved list. We have received the following letter:— Sir, -Having read your article in the issue of Thursday 24th November, entitles A Military Mystery, we consider that you deserve the thanks of the whole community in making this matter public; and beg to state that we have lodged a formal petition with the Governor-General with the object of having the question reopened and the whole matter thoroughly investigated. It appears that captain Rushall, who has for years bestowed both time and money on the defence force, also on charitable and patriotic movements, has been most drastically and un justly treated, and it seems that Lieutenant S. J. Armstrong is about to meet a somewhat similar fate. We trust that the present Government will not allow the military caste and militarism to rise in this young country, especially as we are just about to launch out on a great, military scheme, and we feel sure that they will see that fair play is meeted out to those officers who have served their country well. —On behalf of the parents of the Australian Mounted Cadets, ARTHUR W CLEVELAND, W. H. BROWN, WILLIAM MATTHEWS. Melbourne, 3rd December.66
  • 22 Apr 1911, Captain Rushall, late of the Melbourne Cavalry, arrived in Adelaide by the express on Friday for the purpose of joining the Australian Mounted Cadets, who are on the Orvieto on the way to the Coronation. The following cadets, in charge of Captain Rushall, are passengers from Victoria: —Messrs. G. C. Altmann, A. G. Bennett, R. Buchanan, T. Budds, A. Cole, H. Francis, N. Hancock, H. D. Holland, H.F. McCrae, S. A. McWilliams, C. Newman, B. F. Pitt, T. Rand, H. P. Stott, G. H. Tovell, and G. T. Warburton. Lieutenants Thornton and George are also among the number. The South Australian section of the cadets on tour comprised M. W. Woodley, 18 (quartermaster-sergeant), J. D. Gilbert, 17, H. E. Dean, 17, J. G. Murray, 18, and H. L. Davidson, 17 (all of St. Peters College, and J. C. Agnew, 18, of Hobart, Tasmania, also left by the steamer. The Minister of Agriculture (Hon. J. P. Wilson) will leave Adelaide to-day for Hammond and Port Augusta, on a propaganda campain. He will return on Wednesday.67
  • 28 Jul 1911, CAPT. RUSHALL'S CADETS.
    Tha 25 Victorian Mounted Cadets mentioned in the cablegrams, who include in their numbers five South Australian cadets and some from Tasmania, are in no way connected with the New South Wales Contingent of Infanty Cadets under Mjr. Wynne. They are a Commonwealth Cadet Contingent, and their commanding officer is Capt. Rushall, of Melbourne. The Victotrians and South Australians were enrolled members of the cadet forces, some of them being commissioned and non-commissioned officers in their school companies. These boys paid their own expenses, and are in no wise indebted to the Commonwealth Government; but, having been recognised by them, and being units of the Common wealth Defence Forces, are entitled to re ceive the Coronation medal. They will leave for Australia via Capetown on September 30 in the new 10,000-ton steamer Aeneas.68
  • 9 Nov 1911, AUSTRALIAN MOUNTED CADETS RECEPTION BY GOVERNOR-GENERAL.
    In every British community which they have visited the 24 Australian Mounted Cadets, under Captain Rushall, who have been visiting Europe have been accorded a civic reception. Although 19 of the lads are Victorians and they have done credit to the State, they have been refused this recognition by the Lord Mayor of Melbourne (Councillor Davey). They will not, however, suffer by reason of this refusal, because His Excellency the Governor-General has agreed to receive them at Government-house on Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock and will subsequently entertain them at afternoon tea. In the evening the reception committee of which Mr T Rand is secretary, will entertain the cadets at the Masonic hall at 8 o'clock, when it is hoped that all the old members of the company who can be present will attend in uniform to welcome the lads home.69
  • 12 Nov 1911, LORD DUDLEY AND THE VICTORIAN CADETS. — An interesting ceremony took place at the Duke of York's School, Chelsea, on September 29, when silver Coronation medals presented by the King were conferred on the Victorian Mounted Cadets, who were leaving England. The Earl of Dudley, in the absence through indisposition of Lady Dudley, performed the ceremony, and the visitors present in cluded Sir George H. Reid, High Commissioner for the Australian Commonwealth, and Admiral Sir Cyprian Bridge. The cadets were 24 in number, and were under the command of Cap tain Rushall, Lieutenant Thornton, and Second Lieutenant George. Lord Dudley said that he was very glad to have got back from Australia in time to be present at the gathering. He hoped the cadets had had an interesting and enjoyable time during their stay in the Old Country, and that they would be able to look back upon it with pleasure. They had doubt less learned a good deal, and perhaps their views had been broadened. He was sure they had worthily maintained the reputation of their corps, and had shown what an excellent spirit existed among the people of Australia. He hoped that they realised more than they had ever done before the greatness and importance of the Empire, and that they would always be prepared to help towards maintaining the unity of the Empire and to fight its battles whenever duty might call upon them to do so.
    THE MOUNTED CADETS' RETURN.— These mounted cadets, who went to Europe at their own expense, but with the official recognition of the Commonwealth authorities, arrived at Adelaide on Tuesday afternoon by the Holt liner Aeneas, under the command of Captain Rushall, a Victorian cavalry officer. The troop, which numbered 24, had a most enjoyable and profit able tour, which embraced England, Italy, Switzerland, France, and Holland. Captain Rushall said the Commonwealth authorities gave them every assistance in London. In the afternoon the cadets were tendered a reception at the Adelaide Town Hall by the Acting-Mayor, Alderman Bonython. The contingent will continue their homeward journey on Wednesday after noon at 4 o'clock.70
  • 14 Nov 1911, CADETS AND FORCED DRILL. Speech by Ssenator Pearce.
    On behalf of the Commonwealth Govern ment, the Minister of Defence, Senator Pearce, welcomed the mounted cadets at a social evening and concert that was held last evening at the Masonic Hall. The cadets, with Captain Rushall in command, marched in file up the hall and took up a position on the platform. They were greeted with applause and cheers. The Minister said seven months had passed, since the cadets left Australia, and he was sure they did not look any the worse, for their trip. They were fine specimen of young Australian manhood. After explaining why the Commonwealth Government had declined to send a contingent to the Coronation ceremony— the main reason being a desire to save the cost (about £30,000), as the Government had decided to spend some £3,000,000 this year on de fence—Senator Pearce went on to speak of the complaints that had been made as to the alleged unfairness of cadets being "dragged out on Saturday afternoon and made to drill for two hours at a time!" (Laughter.) He knew that some years ago he had stood at a football match for a longer period and not realised that he was tired. lt had been called compulsory train ing, but he saw very little "compulsory" about it at all. When it was realised that there were 90,000 young Australians under instruction, and in not a single case had prosecution been necessary, he could not see much "compulsory" about the scheme. (Applause.) He did not want to take away the whole of the boys' Saturday afternoons, nor stop all their enjoyment, but he wanted them to realise that this was the land which was to be their future inheritance. They must realise that they had a grave responsibility to keep the flag flying for the next quarter of a century. He appealed to the parents and to the sweethearts of the young men of the coun try for their support in helping to awaken the lads to their sense of'duty. He would appeal especially to these young cadets who had had such a fine experience, that they should seek to become officers. There was a great need for officers in every State in the Commonwealth, and the experience they had had would be a fine help to them in seeking a commission. He urged that if necessary they should go through the ranks in seeking promotion. The best leader was the man who could follow, and the best commander was the man who could obey. They wanted men who could lead when the time came. (Applause.) Captain Rushall, in reply, thanked the Government for all that had been done for the movement. It was the official sanction of the Government that had obtained for the corps the facilities that they had had in England. An illuminated address was presented to Captain Rushall and the officers by Mr H. F. M'Crea, and a presentation of a clock was made to the commander by the officers, N.C.O.'s and troopers of the Mel bourne Cavalry. A musical programme was given, which was greatly enjoyed by the 350 people present.71
  • 1 Apr 1912, Melbourne, 30th March. CADETS' TOUR. Some time ago the Minister for Defence (Senator Pearce) commented favorably upon the excellent work accomplished by Captain Rushall who organised the first tour for the instruction of Australian cadets. The Minister then declared that he would ap prove of another tour under the same conditions as the last two tours. The conditions were that the tour should be open to the cadets of the whole of the Commonwealth, and that the expense should be borne by the parents. Every assistance, however, in the direction of making the tour a success would be given by the de fence authorities. Captain Rushall is interesting himself in arranging another tour, and circulars will be issued throughout the Commonwealth next week. In all likeli hood the contingent of cadets will leave Australia some time in May.72
  • 9 Apr 1912, BENDIGO EASTER FAIR. 41 st. ANNIVERSARY.
    ... GRAND EMPIRE NAVAL AND MILITARY PAGEANT. Under the Direction of Captain Rushall.73
  • 23 Apr 1912, A TRAVELLING CADETSHIP FUND. TO THE EDITOR OF THE AGE. Sir,— With reference to the proposed world's tour of cadets, which Captain Rushall has consented to command provided the applications be sent in without delay, very little appears to he known about this movement, therefore I desire, with your assistance, to draw attention to the fact that too much publicity cannot be given to this new and very important phase to the finish of our sons' education. From an Imperialistic point of view the tours are very far reaching. It is understood on good authority that the Government will not sanction a tour next year on account of the general elections, therefore it behoves us to avail ourselves of this grand opportunity. As a citizen, I now wish to place a proposition before the public with the object of creating an interest in our new cadet system, in view of the antagonistic stand that has been taken by so many: — That two cadets from each State be included or added to the troop, and be selected as for a scholarship from the metropolitan areas, the conditions as laid down by Captain Rushall to be adhered to. The selection to be by competition, to be arranged as early as possible. The cadets should be of good address and have a fair education. These details will be taken into consideration by the captain, no doubt, when drawing up the final conditions. This will require two things—firstly, that the date of departure be postponed until the end of May; and, secondly, that funds be raised immediately in each capital. I feel sure that there will be no difficulty to raise the small amount required from our patriotic citizens with the valuable aid of the press before the end of a fortnight, considering the most generous and patriotic offer made by Captain Rushall. I will go one step further, and suggest that four naval cadets should be attached in view of our new naval policy. So far these lads have not had a show, and I understand that some of the parents would be only too willing to hear their sons' portion of the expenses so that they should have the opportunity, like their military brothers, to see the great navies of the world. I have read a wonderful account of last year's tour, published by Cadet Tovell, obtainable from Mullen's, and would strongly reeommend those interested to read same. I enclose £5 towards a "Travelling Cadetship Fund," with the understanding that travelling kit and pocket money be provided by the successful cadets. It is my intention to communicate with the press in each capital to support the movement in their State. Large and wealthy cities like Ballarat and Bendigo might raise enough in their districts to send a local lad. Those parents who can afford the amount mentioned in prospectus (and there are many) should not miss this chance to let their sons obtain what they themselves could not, if they paid double the amount. I trust you will support the above, and agree to receive amounts for the fund.— Yours, &c. IMPERIALIST
    [£5 enclosed.- Ed. "The Age."]74
  • 1 Jan 1914, MAKING BELGIAN SAILORS. A PRACTICAL TRAINING SHIP. HOW BOYS ARE TAUGHT. L'AVENIR VISITS MELBOURNE. An object of much interest among the shipping on the south bank of the River Yarra during the holidays has been a neat-looking, four-masted, white-painted barque, of about 2,000 tons, which has appeared to be alive with a particularly youthful, athletic, musical, happy, and smartly-uniformed crew. A company of young nautical students are travelling on the barque L'Avenir, which is a semi-state Belgian training ship. L'Avenir travels about the world upon trading ventures, under State direction, but, at the same time, provides training for from 40 to 50 cadets, who propose to enter the maritime service as officers. The boys commence at 16 or 17 years of age, and spend four years in their course. The preliminary training is obtained upon a stationary vessel. The subsequent voyaging upon the barque L'Avenir is the main course of training, however.
    The vessel was built in 1908, specially for this purpose, out of funds subscribed privately. She was then presented to the Belgian Government, and has since been sailed under the full control and supervision of the State, though also under the auspices of the Belgian Association Maritime. She was here on a similar visit last year. On this trip she has brought a cargo of timber and pig-iron, and she will take back a full load of wheat. She is manned by a professional crew quite apart from her complement of boys, but, though the latter have to pay certain fees for their instruction; the ship naturally has not proved a paving concern. On the other hand, her trading ventures have served to reduce very considerably the cost of her maintenance. Such loss as there is each year on the vessel is borne by the Belgian Government.
    L'Avenir carries a full staff of instructors to enable her to be a properly-equipped floating school. The boys are supposed to be well advanced in their ordinary education by the time they reach her, and much of their instruction on board is of a technical character. Professor Woestyn and Dr. Wagner, and the ship's officers and lieutenants between them, give in struction in astronomy, electricity, signalling, hygiene and medicine, commercial arithmetic, commercial business practices and law, maritime law, and the French and English languages, as well as all phases of the laws and practices of navigation and naval manœvres. The vessel is under the command of Captain E. Cornellie, his second officer being M. J. Meulemeester.
    In port, of course, the life of L'Avenir is touched with holiday spirit, and the regular training is, in part, suspended. There are excursions on shore, where the boys have made many friends, and functions on board. At sea, however, Captain Corneille works upon a regular course of instruction for the boys which nothing but hurricanes can change. The night is divided into three watches, covering 12 hours in all. Each boy gets eight hours sleep and four hours on watch. During the day a definite programme is followed, though always one of the three divisions of boys may be with drawn to assist in handling the vessel should they be needed. At a quarter to 8 o'clock all assemble on deck. Breakfast follows at 8 o'clock, and they are then free to do as they like until 9 o'clock, when school commences. Nothing is permitted to interfere with this time of study and instruction. "We only interrupt them when the ship turns turtle," says Captain Cornellie. There is an interval at 12 o'clock for lunch, and then a spell of further freedom until 2 o'clock. There is a good library on board, and an organ and a piano. The boys devote much of their spare time to music.
    This luncheon interval is the time seized upon by the commander for purposes of discipline. It is his punishment time. Captain Cornellie is the only man on the ship who is authorised to punish the boys, and be does it by a system which he thinks combines correction with education. If a boy is proved to have sinned against the pro fessors, he is sentenced to do a certain period of study. If his crime is against the laws or officers of the vessel, a period of work on board is ordered, from 2 o'clock until 4 o'clock school is in again. At 4 o'clock there is tea, and from half-past 4 until 6 o'clock the boys engage in the practical work of navigation.
    Supper—they believe in plenty of food on board for growing boys—is served at 6 o'clock, and then there follows an hour at signalling and telegraphy. The instruction covers, of course, the wireless system, with which L'Avenir is fitted. From half-past 7 o'clock the boys are free until 8, when they go off to bed, or take their watch. There are no studies on Saturday and Sunday. There is the usual clean up on Saturday morning, while the afternoon is spent in pracising life saving, fire drill, and other similar exercises. Sunday is devoted to religious services and rest. There is a priest on board.
    The work on L'Avenir is thoroughly matter of fact, if nothing else. The boys, to begin with, obtain practical experience of the merchant service, and the actual sailing of a vessel on commercial projects. They are picked from the middle and upper classes. There is one nobleman's son on board on this trip, while, when she set out, her company also included a son of the largest newspaper proprietor of Belgium. He became ill, and had to leave the vessel early on her cruise.
    The practical training goes further than all this, however. When they teach life-saving the officers do it thoroughly, and, if no boy will be so obligingly careless as to fall overboard, they throw one over, and then rescue him. When the vessel was in the Indian Ocean in October she sailed close to the Norwegian barque King Oscar II. As she did so, Captain Cornellie, suddenly decided that L'Avenir was sinking (for educational purposes only), and must be abandoned immediately. He gave the orders. At once the boys took to the boats, and all rowed as fast as they could for King Oscar II. The captain of the latter witnessed the manœuvre with much astonishment and some perturbation. He admitted subsequently that he had some thoughts of Captain Kidd and a crew of pirates bold. He signalled anxiously to know by what right an attempt was being made to board his barque, which was a peaceful trader. Captain Cornellie soon reassured him.
    The neutrality of Belgium is guaranteed by certain powers, and it has no proper navy. The activity it is displaying in training young maritime or naval officers, however, and certain political events in that country, are pointed to sometimes as signs that a new order of things is promised for the futute, in which Belgium will take her place among the naval nations of the world.
    The barque, which is lying on the south side of the river, opposite No. 16 Wharf, will he in port for some time yet taking on her cargo. The boys' school work is to be carried on at the rooms of Messrs. Stott and Hoare, which have been kindly lent for the purpose. Captain Rushall is acting as a sort of guide, philosopher, and friend to the ship's company of boys during their visit to Melbourne.75
  • 21 Jan 1914, BELGIAN CADETS. CRAZY TO STAY IN AUSTRALIA. PROSPEROUS LAND.
    A party of 40 naval cadets and six officers from the Belgian training ship L'Avenir, now in port at Melbourne, arrived on a week's visit to Sydney by yesterday's express, and received an official welcome at the Town Hall by the Lord Mayor (Alderman Richards).
    The Lord Mayor said he hoped that the visitors would spend a pleasant time in the city, and give good accounts of Australia when they returned to their own country. On behalf of the citizens, he extended them a hearty welcome.
    Commander Cornellie, in reply, said that he knew British people would not expect many words from a sailor. When it had been decided to pay a visit to Sydney they all "jumped up with joy at the idea." (Laughter.) That might not be very good English, but they would know what he meant. They had longed to see the incomparable harbour about whose beauties Sydney people were so modest. (Laughter.) The had longed to mingle with the Parisians of the south. Belgium was not a very large country, but it occupied fifth place in respect to commerce. Antwerp was the second port in the world. Many people he had met in Australia had been surprised when informed that Antwerp was in Belgium, the general impression appearing to be that it was a German port. The Belgians had no aim of conquest. Their great aim was commerce. They had come to Australia to study, being great believers in education by travel. They had been greatly impressed by the evidences of prosperity that they saw on all hands. The condition of the workers seemed to be well nigh ideal. Those aboard his ship were crazy to stay in Australia, where everyone seemed so happy and so comfortable. He hoped that the prosperity which Australia was enjoying would long continue.
    Mr. J. S. Shearston, superintendent of the Royal Naval House, proposed the health of the Lord Mayor, who briefly replied.
    The visitors will he entertained on a harbour trip to-day, and will spend a day at the mountains before returning to Melbourne.
    Captain Cornellie, accompanied by his aide de-camp, Lieutenant Tournaye, and Captain Rushall, of the Commonwealth military forces made an official call on the State Governor during the afternoon.76
  • 28 Jan 1914, "SAD SYDNEY." IMPRESSIONS OF BELGIAN CADETS. NO STREET CAFES.
    The Belgian cadets from the training ship L'Avenir, who have been staying at the Royal Naval House, will return to Melbourne to-day. Yesterday they visited National Park, first paying an official call, under Commander Cornellie, on his Excellency the Governor (Sir Gerald Strickland) at the Government offices in Macquarie-street. The introduction was made by Captain Rushall, representing the Minister for Defence. His Excellency inspected the cadets, and after shaking hands with the officers expressed his gratification at the visit, and his willingness to do all in his power to render their stay a pleasant one Commander Cornellie, in thanking his Excellency, declared that they had already received very many kindnesses.
    The cadets appear to have enjoyed their visit to Sydney. "It is more pretty than Melbourne," said one, "I do not like all the streets arranged in squares." Their opinion of the architectural beauties of Sydney, such as the G.P.O., for instance, was singularly unenthusiastic, but their praise of "our harbour" was rapturous. But some things puzzled them considerably.
    "Why is your Sunday so sad?" asked one plaintively. "In Belgium we go to a cafe, we visit the theatre, we hear music, we amuse ourselves well. But in this country there is nothing! Everything is closed. There is what is strange—but of a strangeness!" "How do you find this climate!" they were
    asked. "But it is beautiful that," was the answer in a tone of warm conviction, "only it is sometimes too hot, and there is too much dust." "It is worse in Melbourne," broke in another, "there one stifles sometimes, one can hardly breathe."
    "But why," asked one, "do you not have street cafes in Sydney? Nowhere can one sit down-except on the ground. And yet many people here like to sit down for hours at a time. I see them in the parks, or in the gardens. Last Sunday I even saw two men who sit on the pavement against a wall. I passed them there at 2 o'clock, and when I came back at 7 o'clock still they remain, sitting always, with the arms folded. It is a strange pleasure that!"
    But a companion took him up eagerly. It was true what his friend had said, but yet he was of the opinion that they were a people most industrious, the Australians. Had he not seen from the train all the farms, the houses they had built in the country? Ah, it was a good country for the working classes-better than the United States.
    The mention of strikes seemed to amaze him. "Have you that many strikes here?" he inquired in surprise. "Truly the workman is never satisfied."
    Mr. Shearston, superintendent of the Royal Naval House, will be sorry to bid the lads good-bye. 'It is unaccountable to me," he said yesterday, "that the Belgians in Sydney have taken absolutely no notice of the cadets' presence. Both Captain Rushall and I called at the Consulate, but each time the Consul was out, and the Vice-Consul, or Deputy Consul, was apparently too busy with his own affairs to bother about anything else. I have had sailors, ordinary A.Bs., here of almost every nationality under the sun, and this is the only case in which the residents took no interest in visitors from their own country. The only exception in this instance was that of some modistes from a big shop in the city, who came down here in great eagerness to know whether there was anyone from their own town among the cadets. When they actually found there was one the rejoicings and exitement were tremendous."77
  • 11 Feb 1914, UPPER BEACONSFIELD. On the occasion of the second visit of the Belgian cadets from the training ship L'Avenir to Upper Beaconsfield, on Friday last, a concert was given by the local residents. A number of items were rendered by the Belgian boys and were much appreciated by all present. Items by local talent also helped to make the evening an enjoyable one. Miss Una Wilson and Miss N. Anderson played a pianoforte duet and songs were rendered by Mrs Trinkhaus and Messrs Hurditch and Berglund, Mrs Hurditch kindly acting as accompaniste. Supper was provided at 10.30 by the ladies, under the supervision of Mrs Harvey Smith, the hall being nicely decorated with British, Australian and Belgian flags. During supper the floor was cleared for dancing which lasted till 1 a.m. Most of the cadets danced during the evening, and both the residents and the visitors spent a most enjoy able time. There was a good attendance of residents and 37 cadets and officers. The Rev. J. Wilson occupied the chair and welcomed the visitors, the professor on the L'Avenir responding in a few well-chosen words. He said they hoped to see Upper Beaconsfield again at the end of the year. The reception was carried through by the following - Messrs W. J. Harvey Smith, C. P. R. Hurditch, W McLean, the Rev. J. Wilson and Mr C. B. Berglund (secretary), assisted by Mrs Harvey Smith, Mrs Hurditch, Mrs Kirkwood, and the Misses N. McLean, Thomson and others. Great credit is due to the committee and residents for the way in which they entertained the visitors; also to Capt. Rushall who made all arrangements for the visit of the cadets at his own expense. The boys left by the midday train on Saturday, a number of the residents, especially the young ladies turning out to see them off. The L'Avenir sailed for Belgium on Monday.78
  • 22 Apr 1914, TOURING CADETS IN CAMP. BEACONSFIELD UPPER, Tuesday. - A body of mounted cadets, who, with Captains Rushall and Ellis and Lieutenants Thornton and Brownlee will leave on a visit to Europe in eight or ten days, are spending the interim in training at Langower. Church parade was held in the grounds on Sunday afternoon. The service was conducted by the Rev. James Wilson, and the singing was led by Code's Band.79
  • 10 Jul 1914, AUSTRALIAN CADETS. ENTERTAINED IN LONDON. LONDON, July 9.
    Lord Roberts on Wednesday inspected the Australian cadets travelling under the care of Captain Rushall of Melbourne. The lads were afterwards entertained at luncheon at the Guildhall where they were addressed by the High Commissioner (Sir George Reid) and the Agents General for Victoria Queensland and Western Australia.
    The "Daily Telegraph" commenting on the presence of the cadets states that the oversea dominions are taking a larger view of their duties to the rising generation than the motherland. "Cadet training" it says has raised unbounded enthusiasm in Australasia, while the motherlands waste of human life is the greatest tragedy of our time."80
  • 6 Aug 1914, OVERSEAS CADETS. FOR HOME DEFENCE. Messrs. F. W. Prell and Co. received the following cable message yesterday from Captain A. Rushall, officer commanding the Overseas Cadets, now in London:
    "Mounted cadets volunteered, home defence only; will be kept together. Cadets noted voluntarily; consider acting as Britishers; they are sure parents would wish it. All well. Will cable if offer accepted."81
  • 8 Feb 1915, HOMEWARD BOUND. CADETS RETURNING FROM ENGLAND. MELBOURNE, February 7.
    The Minister for Defence (Senator Pearce) on Saturday announced that information had been received that the majority of the cadets who went to England under Captain Rushall would leave for Australia by the H.M.S. Orontes on February 12. They are due in Melbourne on March 26.82
  • 20 Feb 1915, AUSTRALIANS IN EGYPT. CAPTAIN RUSHALL RECOVERING. Melbourne, February 12.
    The Minister of Defence (Senator Pearce) to-day received a cable message from the War Office to the following effect: — "It will interest you and relatives of the troops that the condition of Captain Rushall is improving. The Army Council And General Commanding-in-Chief both ex press thanks and satisfaction with the tho rough way the troops have carried out important work."83
  • 3 May 1915, THE MELBOURNE SWIMMING CLUB. The Melbourne Swimming Club, which was responsible for the Hawaiian swimmer's visit to Victoria, will complete 21 years of existence at the next annual meeting at the close of September. It was originally the St. Kilda Swim ming Club, and of the founders Messrs. E. Casper and J. F. Toohey have remained as sociated with it up to the present. It has supplied many champions, for Victoria, notably, F. Pitts, F. Humfress, W. L. Harris, H. A. Bennett, T. W. Mason, C. Powell, W. B. Bennett, I. Stedman, W. H. Finney, S. C. Crane, M. Griffiths, and most of the more prominent swimmers, F. L. Crane, M. Crawcour. C. H. Browne. W. Gant. W. Eicke. and J. McNeil. Melbourne has been the champion club of Victoria for the past five years, and winners off500 yds teams' championship of Victoria for 14 years. The presidents have been Sir George Turner and W. H. Felstead, and associated with the club as vice-presidents have been Hon. Agar Wynne, R. G. McCutcheon, M.L.A., E. Casper, J. D. Hogan, W. H. Browne, J. Fallon, Capt. Alex. Rushall. The secretarial duties have been carried out by E. Casper, A. Rushall, M. Feldham, E. .Mason-Cox, M. C. Meekins, W. H. Browne, and H. Shape. To the last-named the visit of Kahanamoku is largely due. The record of the club in winning classic events— championships — is unique. The club has always had the leading water polo teams, which were so invincible at one time that the premier team was not admitted to the next year's competitions, so that the remaining teams could play on even terms.84
  • 23 May 1915, Lieutenant Harold B. Hughes, killed in action in France, was 20 years of age. He was tour ing England with Rushall's Cadets when war was declared. He joined the Public Schools Corps as adjutant, and afterwards received a commission in the 3rd Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, and was attached to the Second Light Highland Infantry at the front. He was also acting-censor.85
  • 22 Dec 1915, A party of Belgian cadets visited Upper Beaconsfield last week at the invitation of Captain Rushall and they were entertained on Sunday afternoon, just prior to their return to the City. There was a fairly large gather ing of district residents and a very pleasant afterroon was spent Musical selections were rendered by a band and addresses were given by Captain Rushall and Mr Harvey Smith. It was stated that some of the cadets who had visited the district about twelve monrths ago had fallen in the war.86
  • 23 Dec 1915, BELGIAN OFFICERS ENTERTAINED. The officers and cadets from the ship L'Avenir, now berthed in Melbourne, have been the guests of Captain Rushall at Llangower, Beaconsfield, since Saturday. On Saturday the visitors were entertained in the public hall by a concert. They were most cordially welcomed by a large gather ing of residents. On Sunday afternoon a large crowd assembled at Llangower to witness the unfurling of the Belgian flag. Captain Rushall explained that the outlook on which the Belgian flag rested had been recently erected as a memento of the visits of Belgian citizens on former occasions. Monday was spent by a trip to Nobelius's nursery at Emerald with various bush picnics en route. On Tuesday the visitors were driven to Mr Bunt's orchard and entertained for the afternoon. They leave for Melbourne on Wednesday, and will then be the guests of Dr Crivelli.87
  • 13 Jan 1916, Captain Rushall has presented the Belgian tower built on his estate to the people of Beaconsfield.
    The tower stands on a high hill, and commands an extensive view of the surrounding country and the entrance to Port Phillip Bay. The name has been conferred on it in honor of the brave little nation of Belgium, by whom the Australian Mounted Cadets when touring in Europe were received with the utmost courtesy and hospitality. Commander Verrhe, of the Belgian ship L'Avenir, with his wife and children and the officers and men, attended the ceremony of flying the flag from the tower.88
  • 16 Feb 1916, BEACONSFIELD UPPER - At the invitation of the residents of Beaconsfield Upper, a company of wounded soldiers visited the district on Sunday, the soldiers together with the owners of the card making up a party of 70. They were heartily welcomed by the reception committee at Salisbury House, where they were entertained at lunch. In the afternoon they were the guests of Captain Rushall at "Langower," and left for Melbourne at 5 o'clock.89
  • 17 Feb 1916, On Sunday last, the Red Cross Society of Upper Beaconsfield entertained 46 returned soldiers at dinner at "Salisbury House," and in the afternoon Captain Rushall, of "Langower," entertained them at afternoon tea. Seven motor cars and a char-a-banc conveyed the visitors to and fro. On the return journey each car and each occupant were decorated with festoons of flowers and ferns.90
  • 30 Aug 1916, A youth named Walter Fehmel, a guest of Captain Rushall's, Upper Beaconsfield, met with a riding accident on Saturday last. He was riding a spirited pony owned by Mr A. Shorthouse, and it bolted, throwing the rider against a tree. Fehmel sustained a slight concussion and a broken arm. He was attended to by Dr Griffith.91
  • 4 Jan 1917, UPPER BEACONSFIELD. The special event on Boxing Day at Beaconsfield Upper was a garden fete which was held at "Langower," the residence of Captain Rushall.
    There was a large gathering of visitors and residents. The object was to raise funds for the renovation of the Assembly Hall. Stalls of fancy goods, flowers, garden produce and refreshments were arranged in the shade of the trees, and for two or three hours the holders were kept busy. Code's band played during the afternoon. Mr Edward a'Beckett, one of the first trustees of the hall property, opened the fete, and in a reminiscent address made kindly references to the services rendered to the district by his co-trustees (Messrs W. Elms, T. Brind, W. Goff, and Professor Halford). In the evening a concert was given in the hall for the same object, and on the next day a gymkhana was held by the visitors at Salisbury House. The total net amount raised was about £35.92
  • 28 Feb 1917, BEACONSFIELD UPPER. — A party of wounded and convalescent soldiers were conveyed by motorists to Beaconsfield Upper on Sunday and were entertained at luncheon and tea by the residents. In spite of the weather, some 80 to 100 visitors made the journey. Langower House and grounds were to have been visited in the afternoon but instead the company remained in the Assembly Hall where a brass band from Melbourne kept everybody cheerful.93
  • 1 Mar 1917, UPPER BEACONSFIELD. On Sunday last convalescent sol diers to the number of 80, were entertained by the residents. Dinner (galore) awaited them on their arrival in the Assembly Halls, of which they heartily partook after their journey from town. Captain Rushall had arranged for their visiting his residence, "Langower," to tea afterwards, and in order that they might enjoy themselves, he had hired the Prahran City Band. The rain, however, coming down in torrents with out intermission, hindered the arrangements, with the result that tea was spread in the hall, while the "band played." The soldiers, however, seemed to relish the cordial reception given them, and spent the afternoon chatting with the girls and telling stories of their experiences. They left by motors at 4.30 p.m. on their return journey.94
  • 10 Aug 1917, BERWICK SHIRE COUNCIL. CORRESPONDENCE.
    From H. Glismann, acting secretary of Beaconsfield Upper Progress Association, drawing attention to the road between Salisbury House and Mr Kerr's. It needed repair. Also re the road between Miss Cannon's and Mr Lockey's corner, more especially in front of Dr Drake's. Also to the growth of saplings on sides of road between Mr Luke's and Captain Rushall's.-Clerk of works to attend, on motion of Crs Martin and Henty.95
  • 10 Aug 1917, As the Belgian training ship " L'Avenir " is in Victorian waters again, the residents are preparing to entertain the cadets. I believe that they will be in this district on the 17th and 18th, and arrangements are being made to entertain them on the evenings of those dates. A public meeting will be held this (Wednesday) evening to arrange details.96
  • 23 Aug 1917, BEACONSFIELD UPPER. On.Friday evening, the officers and cadets of the Belgian "Strumer L'Avener" were entertained at a concert, by a talented number of artists from Melbourne, through the goodness of Captain Rushall, "Langower." The occasion was a success, every corner of the ball being ntilised. On Saturday evening the residents returned the compliment by giving a conversazione, which was also well attended.97
  • 3 Sep 1918, BEACONSFIELD UPPER.-Langower, the country residence of Captain Rushall, was burned to the ground on Friday morning. The fire broke out in the washhouse, at the back of the building, at about a quarter to 6 in the morning. Considerable improvements had recently been made to the property, and valuable heirlooms were destroyed. The origin of the fire is unknown.98
  • 5 Sep 1918, On Friday morning "Laugower," the residence of Captain Rushall, caught fire. Mrs Gordon, who is in charge, was awakened by the noise, and called for assistance. Only the piano, which had recently been put into the house, could be saved.99
  • 6 Sep 1918, A fire occurred at Upper Beaconsfield on Friday morning last, by which "Langower," the residence of Captain Rushall, was destroyed. During the war period several parties of returned soldiers have been entertained at this residence, the grounds being very tastefully laid out. The loss will be a severe one to Captain Rushall.100
  • 9 Sep 1921, STEYNE, 39 Robe St., St. Kilda. - Double bal. Vacancies, single Bungalows, garage, E.L.101
  • 4 Dec 1926, Captain Alexander Rushall died at his home, Hotham street St Kilda, early yesterday morning.Captain Rushall, who was aged 58 years, had been associated for many years with the firm of F. W. Prell and Co. He was the founder of the Melbourne Cavalry Corp and Mounted Cadets, and one of the founders of the Melbourne Swimming Club. Captain Rushall organised three tours for boys to Great Britain and Europe taking 25 boys in each. In the last tour the war broke out and the boys, with Captain Rushall, volunteered in a body, and were accepted for service. While on service Captain Rushall contracted a serious illness, and subsequently suffered continuous poor health. He was of a very philanthropic nature, which he showed especially by assisting boys to obtain higher education. The funeral will leave Christ Church, Acland street, St. Kilda at a quarter to 4 o clock this afternoon, and there will also be a choral service at the church, of which Captain Rushall was an early member, as also is his family.102
  • 3 Mar 1927, CAPTAIN A. RUSHALL. ESTATE OF £34,705. Scholarships for Boys.
    Captain Alexander Rushall, of Hotham street, St Kilda, who died on December 3, left by will dated September 15, 1926, real estate of a gross value of £4,150, and personal property of a gross value of £30,555. His will was lodged for probate yesterday. Captain Rushall left the income from £500 to his brother, Mr Frederick William Rushall, for the life time of the beneficiary, in addition to any other provision made for his brother in Captain Alexander Rushall's lifetime.
    The net income from the estate for a period of three years is to be paid in the following proportions - Three thirteenths to Mr Harry Prell, merchant, of Queen street, city, 2-13th to Flavouer Alice Bates, of St Kilda, 2-13ths each to Major Alexander Weir Murdoch and Mr Bert Knight, and 1-13th to Mr Henry Pucknell, "all three of whom are at present with the firm of F W Prell and Company", 1-13th share to Lieutenant Henry James Thornton, of Buckhurst street, South Melbourne, 1-26th share each to Warrant Officer William James and Sergeant Major Samuel Lewis, both of the Defence department, and both of whom were previously attached to my command (cavalry)"; and 1-13th share to be distributed in gratuities and other charitable purposes.
    Testator directed that on the expiration of three years his trustees (the Union Trustees Company) should divide the in come from his estate into two equal shares and distribute these shares as follows: - One of such shares to be distributed yearly or half-yearly in such proportions as his trustees should think fit among boys' homes or other institutions for the benefit, improvement and advancement - mental, moral and physical—of poor, needy, or neglected boys under the control and direction of the Church of England in Victoria; the other half of the income from his estate to be utilised by his trustees to endow scholarships, of an annual value not to exceed £100 each a year, to be awarded exclusively to Protestant boys attending high schools or technical schools within Victoria to enable them to attend and obtain the benefit of professional, scientific of higher technical or educational training of any nature whatsoever at the University of Melbourne, or any other edu cational institution in Australia, or from and person or company or corporation in Australia approved by his trustee, or, in exceptional cases, for similar training abroad. His trustee is to have an absolute discretion regarding the number of scholarships to be awarded, and the duration and conditions thereof, and regard ing the standard of the examinations or other qualifications thereof. Testator expresses the wish that no scholarship should be awarded to any boy, howsoever deserving he might be in other directions, whose parents or guardians were in such a position financially that they could provide for the boy's higher education without any outside assistance. His trustee might delegate discretion under the clause from time to time to any suitable committee or persons appointed and approved by them, with power to his trustee at any time to revoke any such appointment so that such discretion should always be exercised in accordance with the expressed wishes.
    Captain Rushall was the founder of the Melbourne Cavalry Corps and mounted cadets. His philanthrophy in life took the form of assisting boys to obtain higher education.103
  • 3 Dec 1929, RUSHALL.-A tribute of respect to the memory of Captain Alexander Rushall (late Melbourne Cavalry) who passed away on 3rd December, 1926 (inserted by ex-Warrant-officer W. James, Instructional Staff Corps, C M Forces, Australia)
    RUSHALL - In memory of our friend, Captain Alexander Rushall who died on the 3rd December 1926 (Inserted by H J Thornton and H C Pucknell)104
  • 3 Dec 1934, RUSHALL -In memory of our friend Captain Alexander Rushall who died on the 3rd December 1926 (Inserted by H C Pucknell and H J Thornton.)105
  • 17 Feb 1942, RUSHALL SCHOLARSHIPS.
    Under the terms of the bequest of the late Alexander Rushall, of St. Kilda, annual awards of scholarships are made to Protestant boys attend- ing secondary and technical schools within Victoria. The Union Trustee Company of Aust. Ltd., which is the executor of the will, has announced the following awards:
    Bell. G. W. Geelong HS, for Geelong HS; Bishop, R. E.. University HS, for Melb. University; Chaplin. R. H., Maryborough TS, for Maryborough TS; Fraser, J. R. E., Rushworth HES, for a high school; Greenwood, N. N., University HS, for University HS; Gundry, D. L., Melbourne HS, for Melbourne HS; Keam, D. W. Geelong HS for Melb. University; Leseberg, F. J., Wangaratta TS, for Wangaratta TS; Nicolson, P. J., Upwey HES, for Upwey HES; Parker, F. S., Maryborough TS, for Maryborough TS; Pietsch, W. J., Warracknabeal HS, for Warracknabeal HS; Sanders. S. J., Stawell TS, for Stawell TS.106

Citations

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    13 May 1919: Mrs A. E. Brown Balance of purchase money $75
    22 May 1919: Mrs A. E. Brown on account of Purchase of three acres or thereabouts being part of Crown Allotment 2 Section D in the Parish of Gembrook and being part of the land described in Certificate of Title Volume 1822 Folio 364316 - £20
    24 June 1919: Mrs A. E. Brown Balance of purchase money $71 19 0
    14 Apr 1919: Mrs Sarah Watt, Oakleigh, on account of purchase of Lots 19 and 20 on Plan of Subdivision No. 2461 and being the land untransferred in Certificate of Title Volume 3509 Folio 701673 £45
    16 Apr 1919: Mrs Sarah Watt, balance £5
    26 Apr 1919: A W Shorthouse, Beaconsfield, on account of purchase of Lots 21, 22 and 23 on Plan of Subdivision No. 2461 more particularly described in Certificates og Title Volume 2879 Folio 575675 and Volume 3287 Folio 657381 £20
    26 July A W Shorthouse on account of balance of purchase money.
    17 Jul 1920: Capt A. Rushall deposit on purchase of 4 acres and 7 perches being part of Crown Allotment 2 Section D in the Parish of Gembrook and being the balance of the land more particularly described in Certificate of Title Volume 1822 Folio 364316     - £150
    (assets uncollected: Captain Rushall £175).
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  65. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 24 Nov 1910, p8.
  66. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 5 Dec 1910, p6.
  67. [S14] Newspaper - The Advertiser (Adelaide), 22 Apr 1911, p19.
  68. [S14] Newspaper - The Register (Adelaide). 28 Jul 1911, p6.
  69. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 9 Nov 1911, p14.
  70. [S14] Newspaper - Sunday Times (Sydney), 12 Nov 1911, p28.
  71. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 14 Nov 1911, p7.
  72. [S14] Newspaper - Bendigo Advertiser, 1 Apr 1912, p5.
  73. [S14] Newspaper - Bendigo Advertiser, 9 Apr 1912, p1.
  74. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 23 Apr 1912, p10.
  75. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 1 Jan 1914, p3.
  76. [S14] Newspaper - Sydney Morning Herald, 21 Jan 1914, p13.
  77. [S14] Newspaper - Sydney Morning Herald, 28 Jan 1914, p13.
  78. [S14] Newspaper - Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette, 11 Feb 1914, p2.
  79. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 22 Apr 1914 p17.
  80. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 10 Jul 1914, p9.
  81. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 6 Aug 1914, p8.
  82. [S14] Newspaper - Brisbane Courier, 8 Feb 1915, p7.
  83. [S14] Newspaper - Chronicle (Adelaide), 20 Feb 1915, p43.
  84. [S14] Newspaper - Referree (Sydney), 3 May 1915, p13.
  85. [S14] Newspaper - Sunday Times (Sydney), 23 May 1915, p13.
  86. [S19] Newspaper - Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette "22 Dec 1915, p2."
  87. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 23 Dec 1915 p10.
  88. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk, 13 Jan 1916, p32.
  89. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 16 Feb 1916 p10.
  90. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 17 Feb 1916, p2.
  91. [S19] Newspaper - Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette "Berwick Shire News and Pakenham and Cranbourne Gazette (Berwick, Vic. : 1914 - 1917), Wed 30 Aug 1916, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article92090372."
  92. [S196] Newspaper - Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) "4 Jan 1917, p2."
  93. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 28 Feb 1917, p5.
  94. [S196] Newspaper - Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) "1 Mar 1917, p2."
  95. [S82] Newspaper - Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News (Pakenham East, Vic. : 1917 - 1918)
    "10 Aug 1917, p3."
  96. [S82] Newspaper - Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News (Pakenham East, Vic. : 1917 - 1918)
    "10 Aug 1917, p2."
  97. [S196] Newspaper - Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) "23 Aug 1917, p2."
  98. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 3 Sep 1918 p6.
  99. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 5 Sep 1918, p3.
  100. [S82] Newspaper - Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News (Pakenham East, Vic. : 1917 - 1918)
    "6 Sep 1918, p3."
  101. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 9 Sep 1921, p3.
  102. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 4 Dec 1926, p34.
  103. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 3 Mar 1927 p6.
  104. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 3 Dec 1929 p1.
  105. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 3 Dec 1934 p1.
  106. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 17 Feb 1942, p5.
Last Edited2 Jul 2018

Laura Syringa Marshall

F, #1066, b. Jun 1854, d. 23 Nov 1934

Upper Beaconsfield

Frederick Cecil and Laura BROWNE arrived from England in the 1890s, together with her two children from her first marriage to Charles Frederick CRONIN, who died in 1887. Laura and Frederick BROWNE had three further children.
When the family moved to Upper Beaconsfield, they lived in a house called 'Fernacre' in St Georges Road (part PAK-66), renting it from Mrs Sarah Ellen SMITH. When the opportunity arose in early 1898 F. C. BROWNE bought a property in Stoney Creek Road, originally known as 'Farrington' (GEM-D-4). This house is still standing, and is now known as 'Clovelly'. In 1899 he bought the adjoining 16 acre block of land (part GEM-D-3) with frontage to St Georges Road. This was known as Hyde's.
It is believed that the Brownes called their house on Stoney Creek Road 'Waroonga' while they owned it. It was advertised for sale in 1909, as F. C. BROWNE said he was leaving for England. The previous year he had bought three adjoining properties (GEM-D-5, 56, 57), totalling 120 acres. It was not until 1913 that Frederick BROWNE sold his properties. The orchards were sold to Frank Arend WALSTAB. The house and the 16 acres were sold to Elizabeth McLEAN.
The Brownes probably left in 1909, 'Waroonga' being first let to Mrs BARCLAY, who used it as a guest house, then to councillor and real estate agent George W MARTIN. It was while G. W. MARTIN was living there, that the name of the house was changed to Clovelly.
F.C. BROWNE was very involved in The Upper Beaconsfield Progress Association in the early days of the last century, and he was a trustee of the Recreation Reserve. Laura BROWNE played the organ at the Anglican church services for many years. There was a plaque in her memory in St John's Church which was destroyed in 1983. This plaque was not replaced.
Married NameBrowne. 
Married NameCronin. 
Birth*Jun 1854 Clapham, Surrey, England, Jun Q [Lambeth] 1d 325 [par James Garner MARSHALL & Harriett CHASE].1 
Marriage*30 Mar 1881 Spouse: Charles Frederick Cronin. St Giles, London, England, Mar Q [St Giles] 1b 650.2
 
Widow2 Nov 1887Laura Syringa Marshall became a widow upon the death of her husband Charles Frederick Cronin.3,4 
Marriage*10 Aug 1889 Spouse: Frederick Cecil Browne. Paddington, London, England, Sep Q [Paddington] 1a 47.5
(Migrant) Migration/Travel11 Oct 1922 Sailing with Frederick Cecil Browne to Southampton, England. Ship Empress of France sailing from Quebec
Address: c/- Comml. Bank of Australia, 12 Moorgate Street, London
Age 60 - Housewife Retired.6
Death*23 Nov 1934 Purley, Surrey, England.3 
Death-Notice*27 Nov 1934BROWNE.-On the 23rd November, at her residence, Purley, England, Laura, the wife of F. Cecil Browne, late of Ballarat and Upper Beaconsfield, Victoria, in her 81st year.7 
Probate (Will)*25 Apr 1935 BROWNE Laura of Lowens, 132 Brighton-road, Purley Surrey, (wife of Frederick Cecil Browne) died 23 November 1934, Probate London, 25 April to the said Frederick Cecil Browne, retired engineer. Effects £198 9s. 11d.8 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
3 Apr 1881J G MARSHALL - Wine Merchant, Kings Road Lodge, Clapham, Surrey, EnglandAge 279
bt 1903 - 1908Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Frederick Cecil Browne.10,11,12
1914Wendouree Parade, Ballarat, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Frederick Cecil Browne. With Eric Cecil Browne.13
1919Elverwynn, Glenmore Crescent, Sandringham, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Frederick Cecil Browne.14

Family 1

Charles Frederick Cronin b. 10 Mar 1860, d. 2 Nov 1887
Children 1.Laurance Kimberly Cronin+ b. 13 Jan 1883, d. 6 Jul 1969
 2.Bernard Charles Cronin+ b. 18 Mar 1884, d. 9 Jun 1968

Family 2

Frederick Cecil Browne b. Sep 1864, d. 16 Feb 1948
Children 1.Eric Cecil Browne+ b. 1890, d. 10 Jul 1953
 2.Archibald Chase Browne b. 1894, d. 1979
 3.Dorothy Laura Syringa Browne b. 1900, d. 1977

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "parents' marriage Dec 1845 [Wandsworth] 4 580."
  2. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Mar Q [St Giles] 1b 650."
  3. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Cronin/Moden Family Tree - Owner: pinehaven31.
  4. [S63] South Australian Government. BDM Index South Australia "reg Adelaide."
  5. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Sep Q [Paddington] 1a 47."
  6. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, UK, Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960.
  7. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 27 Nov 1934 p1.
  8. [S190] Index to Probate Calendar England, viewed at ancestry.com.au, 1858-1966 "Ancestry.com. England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010."
  9. [S83] Online index to the UK census "1881 census: Class: RG11; Piece: 637; Folio: 25; Page: 44; GSU roll: 1341147.
    father a wine merchant."
  10. [S103] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903.
  11. [S105] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1905.
  12. [S108] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1908.
  13. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  14. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
Last Edited13 Jun 2015

Charles Frederick Cronin

M, #1067, b. 10 Mar 1860, d. 2 Nov 1887
Birth*10 Mar 1860 31 Oakleigh Square, St Pancras, Middlesex, England.1 
Marriage*30 Mar 1881 Spouse: Laura Syringa Marshall. St Giles, London, England, Mar Q [St Giles] 1b 650.2
 
Death*2 Nov 1887 Mitcham, SA, Australia, #D166/347 [par Frederick Joseph CRONIN & Phillippa Catherine TWINBERROW].1,3 
Probate (Will)*14 Feb 1899 1899. CRONIN Charles Frederick of Mitcham South Australia died 2 November 1887 Administration (Limited) London. 14 February to Ernest Chase Marshall distiller the attorney of Laura Browne (wife of Cecil Frederick Browne). Effects £388 19s. 3d.4 

Family

Laura Syringa Marshall b. Jun 1854, d. 23 Nov 1934
Children 1.Laurance Kimberly Cronin+ b. 13 Jan 1883, d. 6 Jul 1969
 2.Bernard Charles Cronin+ b. 18 Mar 1884, d. 9 Jun 1968

Citations

  1. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Cronin/Moden Family Tree - Owner: pinehaven31.
  2. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Mar Q [St Giles] 1b 650."
  3. [S63] South Australian Government. BDM Index South Australia "reg Adelaide."
  4. [S190] Index to Probate Calendar England, viewed at ancestry.com.au, 1858-1966.
Last Edited12 Jun 2015

Bernard Charles Cronin

M, #1068, b. 18 Mar 1884, d. 9 Jun 1968
Bernard CRONIN
(1884-1968)
Father*Charles Frederick Cronin b. 10 Mar 1860, d. 2 Nov 1887
Mother*Laura Syringa Marshall b. Jun 1854, d. 23 Nov 1934
Probate (Will)* Bernard C Cronin. Novelist. Camberwell. 09 Jun 1968. 680/391.1 
Birth*18 Mar 1884 Ealing, Middlesex, England, Jun Q [Brentford] 3a 89.2,3 
Education* Bernard was educated at The Grange, South Yarra, Surrey College, Surrey Hills, and Dookie Agricultural College from which he graduated dux and gold medallist and with a diploma of agriculture in 1901. After jackeroo experience in Gippsland and northern Victoria, he joined his brother Laurie cattle-farming at Marrawah in north-west Tasmania.4 
Marriage*11 Mar 1908 Spouse: Victoria Maud Ferres. Toora, VIC, Australia, #M471.5
 
Marriage-Notice*28 Mar 1908CRONIN–FERRES. – On 11th March at St. Thomas's Church of England, Toora, South Gippsland, by Rev E. V. Wade, Bernard Charles, second son late Chas Fredck Cronin and Mrs. F. C. Browne, Upper Beaconsfield, to Victoria Maud, second daughter of Mr and Mrs. Robert Ferres, Toora.6 
Land-UBeac*15 Mar 1957 GEM-D-44A l/p 41093 (Lot 3), 91 St Georges Road. Transfer from Bernard Joseph Brennan to Bernard Charles Cronin.7 
Widower1964He became a widower upon the death of his wife Victoria Maud Ferres.8 
Death*9 Jun 1968 East Camberwell, VIC, Australia, #D14535 age 84.2 
Death-Notice*10 Jun 1968CRONIN, Bernard Charles. On June 9th (suddenly), at his residence. 84 years. —Inserted by his loving family.
CRONIN. On June 9th (suddenly), Bernard Charles, loved brother of Laurence, Eric (deceased), Archie Browne and brother-in-law of Gladys.
CRONIN. On June 9th, Bernard Charles, much loved uncle of Kathleen (Mrs Kermode), great uncle of Diane (Mrs Stuart-Watts), Kim and Guy.
CRONIN. The Funeral of the late Mr. BERNARD CHARLES CRONIN will leave Le Pine's funeral chapel, 981 Burke Road, Camberwell on THURSDAY (June 13), after a service commencing at 10.50 a.m. for the Springvale Lawn Cemetery.9 
Death-Notice11 Jun 1968CRONIN. Members of the Australian Centre of International P.E.N. (Melbourne) mourn the passing of a former President, Bernard Charles Cronin.
CRONIN, Bernard Charles. On 9th June, dearly loved friend of Marjorie, Jim, Trixie and Kay.10 
Death-Notice12 Jun 1968CRONIN. On June 9th, Bernard Charles, loved uncle of Peg and John Davies and great uncle of Roger, David and Glenn.
CRONIN Bernard Charles. Members of the Quill Club of Australia pay tribute to a gracious gentleman and founder of our club.11 
Note* Bernard Cronin (1884–1968) was an author and journalist. He was born on the 18th March 1884 in Ealing, Middlesex, England, second son of Charles Frederick Cronin (1859–1887), an auctioneer, and Laura née Marshall (1850–1934). His father was advised to go to Australia for the sake of his health. Charles and his wife set off in 1886, leaving Bernard and his brother in England in the care of their grandmother and aunts. In Mitcham, South Australia, Bernard's father succumbed to his illness and died. Laura returned to London and in 1889 married Frederick Cecil Browne, who had taken her under his wing during her husband's illness and accompanied her back to England, and the two of them returned to Australia in the same year, accompanied by Bernard's brother Laurence Kimberley. Bernard himself followed them to Australia in 1890 in the care of the captain of RMS Austral.
He emerged from his education in 1901 with a diploma in agriculture, and was indeed the first recipient of the Gold Medal, from the Dookie Agricultural College, now part of the University of Melbourne in Victoria and still Australia's premier agricultural college. In 1908 he joined his brother Laurie (also a graduate of Dookie Agricultural College) in a cattle-farming venture in Tasmania which, due to the forestation and other natural conditions which had defeated many settlers before them, was not successful.
He married a farmer's daughter, Victoria Maud Ferres, on 11 March 1908. In 1913 he went back to Melbourne, where he worked as a salesman before getting a job as a clerk in the Department of the Navy and began to devote his spare time to writing. He published his first novel The Coastlanders, set in Tasmania, in 1918. He went on to write numerous novels, short stories, poems and a radio play, Stampede (1937), using his own name and a number of pseudonyms, such as Dennis Adair, Hugh Bohun, Wallace Dixon, Tas East and Eric North.
In the 1920s Cronin worked for the Melbourne Herald and in the 1950s he was a contributor to the Melbourne Sun. During World War II he worked as a publicity censor in Victoria and Western Australia.
In 1920 Cronin was one of the co-founders of the Old Derelicts' Club for struggling authors and writers. This in turn became the Society of Australian Authors in 1927, of which Cronin was its first president. This society was wound up in 1936 because, in Cronin's words, it was becoming 'infiltrated by politics'. In 1933 he founded the Quill Club, and was a long term member of the International PEN Club (Melbourne) and was granted life membership in 1961.
He was a keen student of The Bible and supporter of the British-Israelist movement. In his later life he took up woodcarving and painting. He died at his home in East Camberwell, Victoria on 9 June 1968 and was buried in Springvale Cemetery.
Cronin Place (originally proposed to be Cronin Street) in McKellar, a suburb of Canberra, is named after him and is one of a number of streets in the area named after Australian authors.
[edit] Partial bibliography
* The Coastlanders (1918)
* Timber Wolves (1920)
* Bluff Stakes (1922)
* Salvage (1923)
* Toad (1924, serially in the Melbourne Herald) (also published, with some changes, as The Green Flame (as Eric North) in A. Merritt's Fantasy Magazine: Vol. 1, No. 4 July 1950)
* The Satyr (1924, The Melbourne Herald)
* Red Dawson (1927)
* White Gold (1927)
* Dragonfly (1928)
* The Treasure of the Tropics (1928)
* Bracken (1929)
* Romance of the Licensing Court (1930)
* From the Casebooks of Dr. Sars (1930)
* The Golden Skull (Illustrated by Robert Strange, 3 November 1931 in Chums magazine, No. 2043 Vol. 40, pp. 349–351)
* Bushranging Silhouettes. Tales (1932) (with Arthur Russell)
* The Sow's Ear (1933)
* Black Tragedy (as Hugh Bohun) (c. 1933)
* The Valley of Stars (1934)
* The Murchison Murders (1934) (editor) - Author: Arthur Upfield
* The Need for Love (1935) (editor) - Author: Elizabeth Powell
* The Epic of Mr. Plate (5 August 1935 in The Sydney Mail, pp. 12–14)
* Stampede (1937), a radio play
* Story Writing (1937)
* Who Killed Marie Westhoven? (as Eric North) (bet. 1921 & 1940)
* Death Rides the Desert. A Novel (1940) (as Dennis Adair)
* The Shadows Mystery (1944)
* How Runs the Road (1948)
* The Shadows Mystery (1950)
* Three Against The Stars (as Eric North in Fantastic Novels Magazine: Vol. 4, No 1) (May 1950)
* National Theatre Arts Festival: ballet, opera, drama (1951) (editor)
* The Ant Men (as Eric North) (1953)
* Star Gem (Eric North?) (1954)
* A Chip On My Shoulder (as Eric North) (1955)
* The Name is Smith (as Eric North) (1957 (US))
* The Second Sphere (as Eric North in Fantastic Universe Science Fiction magazine) (October 1956)
* Nobody Stops Me (as Eric North) (1960)
* The North Wind (song - words by Bernard Cronin, music by Mabel Down)
* Papers (1890–1969.)12 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 13 Oct 1934, Beaconsfield and some memories
    It is odd to reflect that the Beaconsfield hills are practically unknown to holiday-makers of this generation. The stream of week-end traffic along the Princes Highway flows unreckoning of the ancient loveliness that crowns the heights a short five miles from Berwick where the rambling hawthorn hedges and tumbling green pastures are so reminiscent of rural England. Our fathers were not so disregardful. The wheels of life turned more slowly 40 years ago, leisure and tranquillity had not then given place to a mere spare-time opportunism. One tasted more deeply, perhaps of the apparently trivial things in nature which yet have such powers of consolation for the human heart when the philosophy of intellectual pride has broken down or the stronghold of success has become a prison cell the little things that serve such a high purpose in the organism of creation.
    Looking back on those days one seems to perceive that the good folks who pioneered the Beaconsfield hills were in a sense a peculiar people. They belonged to an era that is past and can never return, for they either came to Australia in the little brave ships or grew up here in the young days of the colony, and one and all had that fine innocence which despite its hardships, belonged to the period.
    They have travelled on, these old ones but the spirit of the tested loyalties abides. The beauty of Beaconsfield, its sentiment and charm remain. The sense of well-being which so soothed the jaded city worker is an unspoiled legacy to his descendants did they but have the vision to claim it. Fires have ravaged the hills and gullies from time to time, and in places the remorseless hand of progress has rested heavily, but the old landmarks survive and the incomparable landscape still lives. Life is too short for much looking back over our shoulders, but to turn reflectively now and then to dear, familiar scenes is to free one from the murky atmosphere of fallacious values.
    Lower Beaconsfield was once known as "Little Berwick." The site marks the original Pante Gurn Gurn Station property, a squatter's run taken up in 1860 or thereabouts, and once a favourite hunting ground for kangaroo. Bowman's track-now almost obliterated-was for many years a district monument to the enterprise of Mrs. Bowman, who was the first to open an hotel when the run was thrown open for selection. Her licensed premises occupied the old station homestead, and were remarkably popular with the travellers on the Gippsland road. When the gold rush to Wood's Point set it this good lady financed out of her savings the cutting of a bush track from Little Berwick over the Beaconsfield hills to Lilydale. Her shrewdness acquired for her the custom of the many gold-seekers who availed themselves of the new route. Some time later the Government com- pensated Mrs. Bowman for her outlay, notwithstanding her confessed self interest.
    Upper Beaconsfield was first occupied to any purpose in 1870, when, following a report of gold found in the "Little Berwick Hills," a small army of diggers made all haste there. At one time some hundreds of miners feverishly invaded Haunted Gully, now submerged beneath the Bea- consfield reservoir of 800 acre feet, which serves the Mornington Peninsula scheme. Right up to the time of its conversion, however, Haunted Gully was worked for alluvial gold by odd fossickers, most of whom were Chinese, with unfailing, if modest, reward. At almost any time one might encounter a clay-soiled son of Con fucious blandly disposing of his speckings to Jim Kerwin, the postmaster, storekeeper, and licensed gold buyer. Elsewhere in the district, especially in Walker's Gully, a honeycomb of shafts attests the faith and energy of the gold seeker of that day, qualities evidently shared by the fugitive fossickers still to be encountered. Indeed, those who best know the history of the hills affirm that one day a rich main reef will be discovered.
    Along the trail of the miners came presently some 200 business men of Melbourne, who sought to benefit by an amended mining clause, which permitted selection of 20 acres of Beaconsfield ground free of the restrictions of permanent residence. From about 1878 onward there ensued a small boom in the building of week-end cottages and a planting of orchards and gardens. From the point of view of health the Beaconsfield hills had long been favourably known to and praised by the medical profession. Here, for example, is an extract from a letter sent by one of the original 200:-Dr. L. L. Smith, father of Melbourne's present Lord Mayor-to the secretary of the Upper Beaconsfield Progressive League in 1899 : "I am positive there is no healthier spot, not only in Australasia, but in the world, and I have visited nearly all the cities of Europe and America and all Australasia. I have resided on and off some 15 years there. My family whenever they have a holiday are sent there to recruit their health, and invariably with the best results."
    Others in the profession who were loud in their praises included such well-known men of the period as Arthur Davenport, Charles Iredell, F. M. Harricks, and James Teague. People in all walks of life flocked to Upper Beaconsfield, not alone for reasons of health, but to enjoy the magnificent panorama to be seen from the grounds of the "Big House." Julian Thomas ("The Vagabond" of "The Argus") wrote:-"I do not know where one can get a more extended view than from the summit of these hills. ... I feel that I could lie here and dream for ever, that I could easily lose all sense of my own poor personality, that I could fancy myself Endymion resting on the classic mount, waited on by the invisible nymphs of Diana."
    To the Upper Beaconsfield of those days came many a famous cricketer, I recall Stoddart, captain of the English Test team, and brilliant Harry Graham .... As a small boy I once revelled in a brief playtime scratch "hand" on the old gravel drive in front of the home of the Rev. James Wilson with Hugh Trumble, bringing all his resources to bear on the kerosene-tin wicket, and Mr. W. Warren Kerr, present chairman of the State Savings Bank commissioners, doing fine work in the slips. On a fine week-end evening residents and visitors thronged "Charing Cross" (where the township roads intersect) and "St. George's parade" (flanking the house built by Professor Billing Halford). . . . Many of the original homes still stand. Among those that come to mind are Fern Acre, Salisbury House (then managed by the Misses Hedrick), Runneymede, Windarra, Rosemount, and Ttekceba (home still of the a'Beckett family the name spelled backwards). But the "Big House," as Beaconsfield proudly terms the Beaconsfield House Hotel, is but a memory to-day. A car service has replaced the local Jehu who met (more or less punctually) the Melbourne train at Lower Beaconsfield, and conveyed one with flapping harness and many a song and quip past the swamp flats, that now are neatly orcharded, up the long foothills to one's holiday destination.
    Upper Beaconsfield waits to be rediscovered. The hills, it is true, have their devotees to-day, but the revival of a general appreciation has yet to come. In these old hills the naturalist may delight, for the natural things abound. As for the ordinary mortal, be he never so jaded, let him listen to the wisdom of "C.W.," writing in "The Australasian" of long ago: "When anyone thinks of dying they go away from Beaconsfield, said our driver."13

Australian Dictionary of Biography

CRONIN, BERNARD CHARLES (1884-1968), author, was born on 18 March 1884 at Ealing, Middlesex, England, son of Charles Frederick Cronin (d.1887), and his wife Laura, née Marshall. Cronin arrived in Melbourne on 28 March 1890 in the charge of the captain of the Austral; his mother and stepfather had preceded him. He was educated at The Grange, South Yarra, Surrey College, Surrey Hills, and Dookie Agricultural College from which he graduated dux and gold medallist and with a diploma of agriculture in 1901. After jackeroo experience in Gippsland and northern Victoria, he joined his brother Laurie cattle-farming at Marrawah in north-west Tasmania. On 11 March 1908 at Toora, Gippsland, he married Victoria Maud Ferres, daughter of a farmer.
About 1913 Cronin returned to Melbourne almost penniless. He worked as a salesman before joining the Department of the Navy as a clerk, but devoted his spare time to writing. In 1918 he published his first novel, The Coastlanders, set in Tasmania. He went on to write some thirty full-length novels, countless short stories and several one-act plays, including the radio play Stampede (1937); he is also represented in anthologies of verse. Cronin wrote under several pseudonyms, including those of 'Hugh Bohun, Denis Adair, Tas East and Eric North'. His reputation rests mainly on his novels Bracken (1929) and The Sow's Ear (1933), both of which express his urge to expose what he termed 'wrong, stupid or uneconomic' in Australian life. E. Morris Miller described the latter as 'a novel of impelling interest, powerful handling and intimate characterization' but added that the characters were 'subordinated to the design of the story'.
In the 1930s Cronin worked for the Melbourne Herald. Later he set up a 'Literary Critical Service' in Flinders Lane, and freelanced. During World War II he was employed as a publicity censor in Victoria and Western Australia. After the war he ran correspondence courses in writing technique for the Melbourne Technical College. From the late 1950s he contributed regularly to the Melbourne Sun.
In 1920, with Gertrude Hart, Cronin had founded the Old Derelicts' Club for struggling authors and artists. Out of this in 1927 came the Society of Australian Authors; as first president in 1928-34, Cronin strove to improve conditions and win recognition for writers. The society was wound up in November 1936 because, according to Cronin, it was becoming 'infiltrated by politics'. In 1933 he founded the Quill Club. He was long a member of the International P.E.N. Club (Melbourne) and was accorded life membership in 1961.
From the early 1930s Cronin spent most weekends at his cottage at Upwey in the Dandenong Ranges, building with local stone and landscape gardening. In his 70s and 80s he took up painting and woodcarving. Craggy-faced with a thick mop of silver hair in old age, he remained vigorous until his last years, when asthma troubled him increasingly. Cronin was a keen student of the Bible and a supporter of the British-Israelite movement, though the family had been Anglican for generations. He died at his home in East Camberwell on 9 June 1968 and was buried in Springvale cemetery. He was survived by two sons and a daughter.14

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/P5, unit 245; VPRS 7591/P4, unit 27.
  2. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D14535 age 84."
  3. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Jun Q [Brentford] 3a 89."
  4. [S55] Adb online, online http://adbonline.anu.edu.au/adbonline.htm, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/cronin-bernard-charles-5826
  5. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913 "#M471."
  6. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 28 Mar 1908, p11.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 6959-763 - C/T 8156-206 - Bernard Charles Cronin of 27 Moorhouse Street East Camberwell Journalist.
  8. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "#D12934 (Age 77) [par Robert FERRES & Caroline TONKIN]."
  9. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 10 Jun 1968, p13.
  10. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 11 Jun 1968, p16.
  11. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 12 Jun 1968, p25.
  12. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_Cronin viewed 23 Oct 2010.
  13. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 13 Oct 1934, p4.
  14. [S55] Adb online, online http://adbonline.anu.edu.au/adbonline.htm, Select Bibliography: Police Life, 15 July 1968; Wireless Weekly, 4 May 1934; Pix, 26 Oct 1946; Herald (Melbourne), 20 Apr, 16 July 1927, 17 Mar 1931; West Australian, 18 Apr 1933; Australasian (Melbourne), 20 May 1939; Sun-News Pictorial (Melbourne), 10, 14 June 1968; B. Cronin papers (National Library of Australia); private information.

    Author: Sally O'Neill

    Print Publication Details: Sally O'Neill, 'Cronin, Bernard Charles (1884 - 1968)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 8, Melbourne University Press, 1981, pp 156-157.
Last Edited2 May 2017

Frederick Cecil Browne

M, #1069, b. Sep 1864, d. 16 Feb 1948

Upper Beaconsfield

Frederick Cecil and Laura BROWNE arrived from England in the 1890s, together with her two children from her first marriage to Charles Frederick CRONIN, who died in 1887. Laura and Frederick BROWNE had three further children.
When the family moved to Upper Beaconsfield, they lived in a house called 'Fernacre' in St Georges Road (part PAK-66), renting it from Mrs Sarah Ellen SMITH. When the opportunity arose in early 1898 F. C. BROWNE bought a property in Stoney Creek Road, originally known as 'Farrington' (GEM-D-4). This house is still standing, and is now known as 'Clovelly'. In 1899 he bought the adjoining 16 acre block of land (part GEM-D-3) with frontage to St Georges Road. This was known as Hyde's.
It is believed that the Brownes called their house on Stoney Creek Road 'Waroonga' while they owned it. It was advertised for sale in 1909, as F. C. BROWNE said he was leaving for England. The previous year he had bought three adjoining properties (GEM-D-5, 56, 57), totalling 120 acres. It was not until 1913 that Frederick BROWNE sold his properties. The orchards were sold to Frank Arend WALSTAB. The house and the 16 acres were sold to Elizabeth McLEAN.
The Brownes probably left in 1909, 'Waroonga' being first let to Mrs BARCLAY, who used it as a guest house, then to councillor and real estate agent George W MARTIN. It was while G. W. MARTIN was living there, that the name of the house was changed to Clovelly.
F.C. BROWNE was very involved in The Upper Beaconsfield Progress Association in the early days of the last century, and he was a trustee of the Recreation Reserve. Laura BROWNE played the organ at the Anglican church services for many years. There was a plaque in her memory in St John's Church which was destroyed in 1983. This plaque was not replaced.
Father*Edward Waite Browne b. 1827, d. 3 Oct 1885
Mother*Fanny Blackden b. 1833, d. Mar 1870
Birth*Sep 1864 Langton by Wragby, Lincolnshire, England, Sep Q [Horncastle] 7a 478.1,2 
Marriage*10 Aug 1889 Spouse: Laura Syringa Marshall. Paddington, London, England, Sep Q [Paddington] 1a 47.3
Note30 Apr 1896 Cecil Browne, sworn and examined.
388. To the Chairman.—I am a fruit grower, living about three quarters of a mile from here. I rent 8 acres and have about 4 cultivated. I have resided here eighteen months. I send the best of my fruit to Melbourne; what will not pay to send I dry. The place was neglected before I got it, and last season was very dry. I suppose I got 40 or 50 cases of apples and pears off it last year. My place was planted just to supply the house. I have put a lot of raspberry-canes in, and mean to put a lot of blackberries in this season. I favour the Oakleigh line. I know the Dandenong Creek. I used to live at Surrey Hills before I came here. I have ridden through old Narre Warren and close down to Dandenong. This line would come to the back of old Narre Warren, I suppose that is about 5 miles from a railway station at present. I think it is all small holdings. I know the country about Black Flats is all small holdings. I do not say that district would support two railways running within 5 or 6 miles of each other, but there would be stuff coming from higher up that would help to make it pay; as the land got into cultivation.
389. To Mr. J. S. White.—If there were a railway, people would go by Oakleigh; I do not know that would rob the Beaconsfield line, because we would grow more stuff, and consume more ; it would take some traffic off the main Gippsland line, but my contention is we should travel oftener, and that would go towards making it up. If I want to go to Melbourne, I have to leave at six in the morning and get back at seven at night, and I do not go oftener than I can help. I would not mind paying 5s. a ton for freight and would be prepared to pay my share by paying higher freight, towards any loss that might be incurred on the new line. If I have stuff lying at the station it is a week before I can get it up, whereas if we had a railway at our doors we could just run out and pick it up at any time.
The witness withdrew.4 
Note*13 Jan 1898 Bought 'Clovelly' Upper Beaconsfield.5 
Land-UBeac*13 Jan 1898 GEM-D-4. Transfer from Louisa Mason to Frederick Cecil Browne. 5a 3r 1p.6 
Land-Note*13 Jan 1898 GEM-D-4: Mortgagee: William John Crump Woolcott. Discharged 1 Nov 1905. Mortgagor was Frederick Cecil Browne.7 
Land-UBeac*7 Nov 1898 GEM-D-9. Charles Priestley Trustees for Recreation Reserve, Frederick Cecil Browne, Jessey Sykes, Caleb Wheeler (19a 3r 34p.)8 
Land-Note7 Nov 1898 GEM-D-9: 19a 3r 34p - as Trustees for Recreation Reserve
A mortgage was taken out from John Beale - discharged 12 Jun 1907.8 
Land-UBeac*8 Nov 1899 GEM-D-3 (part). Transfer from The English Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank to Frederick Cecil Browne. 15a 1r 8p.9 
Land-Note*8 Nov 1899 GEM-D-3 (part): Mortgagee: The English Scottish and Australian Bank Limited. Mortgagor was Frederick Cecil Browne.10 
Land-UBeac*3 Oct 1908 GEM-D-56.57. Transfer from Simon Paternoster to Frederick Cecil Browne. 40a + 59a 2r 7p.11 
Land-Note3 Oct 1908 GEM-D-3 (part).4.56.57: Mortgagee: James Mason - discharged 29 Sep 1913. Mortgagor was Frederick Cecil Browne.12 
Land-UBeac*3 Oct 1908 GEM-D-5. Transfer from The City of Melbourne Bank Ltd to Frederick Cecil Browne. 19a 3r 12p.13 
Land-Note*3 Oct 1908 GEM-D-5: Mortgagee: James Mason - discharged 29 Sep 1913. Mortgagor was Frederick Cecil Browne.14 
Land-UBeac4 Dec 1908 GEM-D-9. Transfer from Frederick Cecil Browne Jessey Sykes to an unknown person . Trustees for Recreation Reserve, William McLean, Caleb Wheeler, John William Knapton (19a 3r 34p.)15 
Land-UBeac*29 Sep 1913 GEM-D-4. Transfer from Frederick Cecil Browne to Elizabeth McLean. 5a 3r 1p.16 
Land-UBeac29 Sep 1913 GEM-D-3 (part). Transfer from Frederick Cecil Browne to Elizabeth McLean. 15a 1r 8p.17 
Land-UBeac*10 Oct 1913 GEM-D-5. Transfer from Frederick Cecil Browne to Frank Arend Walstab. 19a 3r 12p.18 
Land-UBeac10 Oct 1913 GEM-D-56.57. Transfer from Frederick Cecil Browne to Frank Arend Walstab. 40a + 59a 2r 7p.19 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel11 Oct 1922 Sailing with Laura Syringa Browne to Southampton, England. Ship Empress of France sailing from Quebec
Address: c/- Comml. Bank of Australia, 12 Moorgate Street, London
Age 60 - Retired.20
Widower23 Nov 1934Frederick Cecil Browne became a widower upon the death of his wife Laura Syringa Marshall.1 
Death*16 Feb 1948 Worthing, Sussex, England, Mar Q [Worthing] 5h 611 (Age 83.)1,2 
Probate (Will)*29 May 1948 BROWNE Frederick Cecil of 19 Winchester-road, Worthing, died 16 February 1948, Probate London, 29 May 1948, to the Public trustee. Effects £10,918 16s. 6d.21 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
2 Apr 1871Langton Down, Langton, Lincolnshire, England(Head of Household) Edward Waite Browne;
Age 6 - Scholar22
3 Apr 1881Cotgrave Place, Cotgrave, Nottinghamshire, England(Head of Household) Edward Waite Browne;
Age 16 - Farmer's Son23
bt 1903 - 1908Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farmer. With Laura Syringa Browne.24,25,26
1914Wendouree Parade, Ballarat, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: independent means. With Laura Syringa Browne. With Eric Cecil Browne.27
1919Elverwynn, Glenmore Crescent, Sandringham, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: no occ. With Laura Syringa Browne.28

Family

Laura Syringa Marshall b. Jun 1854, d. 23 Nov 1934
Children 1.Eric Cecil Browne+ b. 1890, d. 10 Jul 1953
 2.Archibald Chase Browne b. 1894, d. 1979
 3.Dorothy Laura Syringa Browne b. 1900, d. 1977

Newspaper-Articles

  • 3 Aug 1898, From F. C. Browne, drawing attention to the water running on his land through being turned off the road, and saying that if the present gutter were widened and deepened, and ran through the property and about a chain into Hyde's property, it would ran into a natural drain.-On the motion of Crs. Crichton and James, the Beaconsfield members, with the clerk of works, to inspect.29
  • 31 Aug 1898, From F. C. Browne, Beaconsfield asking that if the council will cut a track .. x 3ft. x 1ft. through his property .. enough into Hyde's property .. outlet to the water, he .. over that of the works for .. his share to be added to his rate instalments of not more than .. -Referred to the Beaconsfield .. to interview Mr. Browne.30
  • 29 Mar 1899, From F. C. Brown, hon. sec. Upper Beaconsfield Progressive League, in reply, asking what part of his letter was considered offensive, as the committee felt that the remarks made on the communication to be a great reflection on them.--On the motion of Crs James and Crichton, the letter was simply received.31
  • 15 Nov 1899, F C. Brown, asking permission to move some sand from the culvert adjoining his property, and stating that if allowed to take all the sand that comes down he would have the catchment cleared out.-Cr. ..n said that the catchment was placed in that position in order to save the sand for road-repairng purposes.-Mr. Brown to be informed.32
  • 25 Apr 1900, From F. C. Brown, drawing attention to the dam put in by council near his house, to catch sand off road, stating that it had become full for the last four days and overflowing into his drain, and from thence onto his land ; offering to keep it cleaned .. at his own expense if he could take the sand he required for his own use .. re planting trees on road in front of his place and forming drain &c. —Cr. Crichton moved that the request for sand be granted. Seconded by Cr. T. Bourke and carried.33
  • 17 Sep 1902, WANTED, working interest in Dairy FARM, about 50 cows, on shares. Waroonga, Upper Beaconsfield.34
  • 5 Oct 1904, From F. C. Brown, stating that sand from the road was silting up his under ground drains and injuring his land ; and submitting conditions under which he is prepared to pay half cost of excavating the main drain.—Left in the hands of the members of the riding.35
  • 7 Nov 1906, Tenders. Supplying metal at F. C. Brown's, Upper Beaconsfield.-W. Carney, £60.36
  • 20 Feb 1909, UPPER BEACONSFIELD. Wednesday, MARCH 3, One O'Clock. ROBERT GUNN and Co and GEORGE W MARTIN base received instructions from Mr F. C. Browne, who is leaving for England shortly, to SELL
    Superior brick and W.B. DWELLING, known as "Waroonga," eight spacious rooms, store-room, washhouse, bathroom, also good stabling, hay and cart shed, pig-sties, &c; together with 20, 40, 100, or 140 acres of land, to suit purchasers, 5 acres immediately surrounding the homestead being under cultivation and fruit trees.
    The land is well suited for orchard purposes and providing splendid residential sites, being high, and the situation particularly healthy and picturesque. All the land can be cultivated at small cost, four miles station. Trips meet all trains. Convenient to post, telegraph and telephone office, school, church, &c; 30 miles Melbourne, four trains daily, one Sunday.
    Also, 3 milking cows, 1 springer, 1 bull, 2 poddies, 1 steer, 10 pigs 4 horses (one particularly good 6-year-old mare), jinker (nearly new), dogcart, spring-cart, dray, S.F. plough, scarifier, roller, harrows, chaffcutter, Douglas pump, spray pump, and barrels, complete ; 2 sets light harness saddle, and bridle, child's saddle, sundry harness, water cart, garden tools, carpenter's tools, churn, and milking utensils, and lot of sundries.37

Citations

  1. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Cronin/Moden Family Tree - Owner: pinehaven31.
  2. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  3. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/ "Sep Q [Paddington] 1a 47."
  4. [S342] Railway Report 1896 online at: http://www.parliament.vic.gov.au/vufind/Record/62438, (Taken at Beaconsfield.) Thursday, 30th April, 1896. Members present: Mr. Cameron, in the Chair ; The Hon. D. Melville, M.L.C. Mr. Harris, Mr. J. S. White.
    1896 Victoria. Report from the Parliamentary Standing Committee on railways on the question of selecting localities for the permanent survey of narow-gauge lines together with the appendices and minutes of evidence. Printed 18 August 1896, p96.
  5. [S61] Upper Beaconsfield History Archive.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1932-201 - Frederick Cecil Browne of Fernacre Upper Beaconsfield Farmer.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1932-201 - Frederick Cecil Browne to William John Woolcott - discharged 1 Nov 1905.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1168-469 - Charles Priestley to Frederick Cecil Browne of "Waroona" Upper Beaconsfield Orchardist, Jessey Sykes of the Pine Hotel Upper Beaconsfield Licensed Victualler and Caleb Wheeler Upper Beaconsfield Orchardist - joint proprietors [trustees].
  9. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1508-600 - The English Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank (now The English Scottish and Australian Bank Limited) to Frederick Cecil Browne of Upper Beaconsfield Gentleman - C/T 2747-338.
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2747-338 - Frederick Cecil Browne to The English Scottish and Australian Bank Limited - discharged 10 Jun 1904.
  11. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3037-391 + C/T 3039-747 - Frederick Cecil Browne of Upper Beaconsfield Gentleman.
  12. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2747-338 + C/T 1932-201 + C/T 3037-391 (57) + C/T 3039-747 - Mortgage No 266013 - Frederick Cecil Browne to James Mason - discharged 29 Sep 1913.
  13. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2644-623 - The City of Melbourne Bank Limited to Frederick Cecil Browne of Upper Beaconsfield Gentleman.
  14. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2644-623 - Mortgage No 266013 - James Mason - discharged 29 Sep 1913.
  15. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1168-469 - William McLean Gentleman, John William Knapton Printer and Caleb Wheeler Orchardist all of Upper Beaconsfield - joint proprietors [trustees].
  16. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1932-201 - Elizabeth McLean of Gembrook Road Upper Beaconsfield Married Woman - C/T 3729-617.
  17. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2747-338 - Elizabeth McLean of Gembrook Road Upper Beaconsfield Married Woman.
  18. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2644-623 - Frederick Cecil Browne to Frank Arend Walstab of Gembrook Road Upper Beaconsfield Clerk.
  19. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3037-391 + C/T 3039-747 - Frank Arend Walstab of Gembrook Road Upper Beaconsfield Clerk.
  20. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, UK, Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960.
  21. [S190] Index to Probate Calendar England, viewed at ancestry.com.au, 1858-1966 "Ancestry.com. England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010."
  22. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG10; Piece: 3378; Folio: 42; Page: 4; GSU roll: 839367."
  23. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: RG11; Piece: 3382; Folio: 80; Page: 8; GSU roll: 1341808."
  24. [S103] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903.
  25. [S105] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1905.
  26. [S108] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1908.
  27. [S114] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1914.
  28. [S119] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1919.
  29. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 3 Aug 1898, p3.
  30. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 31 Aug 1898, p2.
  31. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 29 Mar 1899, p3.
  32. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 15 Nov 1899, p3.
  33. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 25 Apr 1900, p3.
  34. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 17 Sep 1902, p3.
  35. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 5 Oct 1904, p3.
  36. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 7 Nov 1906, p3.
  37. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 20 Feb 1909, p4.
Last Edited6 Jul 2018

Harold Bertram Joseland

M, #1070, b. Jun 1867, d. 22 Oct 1922
Birth*Jun 1867 Worcestershire, England. 
Marriage*1905 Spouse: Ida Graham Taylor. St Leonards, NSW, Australia, #M1905/2370.1
 
Death*22 Oct 1922 Guyra, Sutherland Road, Chatswood, NSW, Australia, NSW #D16446.2 
Death-Notice*25 Oct 1922JOSELAND.-October 22, at his residence, Guyra, Sutherland-road, Chatswood, Harold Bertram, dearly beloved husband of Ida Joseland. Private interment. Melbourne and Tamworth papers please copy.3 
Probate (Will)*1922 Probate on will of Harold Bertrand Joseland of Whitton Rd, Chatswood, N.S.W. granted in London, U.K. to Caroline Gibson Hoadley, married woman. Estate £544 6s 7d.2 
Probate (Will)9 Oct 1934 265/728. Architect. NSW. No files online.4 

Family

Ida Graham Taylor b. 1871, d. 26 May 1956
Children 1.Harold Joseland b. 26 Dec 1905, d. 9 Jan 1906
 2.Bertram Holland Joseland+ b. 12 May 1910, d. Nov 1997
 3.Dorothy Nora Joseland b. 1912, d. 23 May 1943

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages "#M1905/2370."
  2. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, ancestry: Pugh, Floud, Farnan Family Tree - owner: verberne186.
  3. [S14] Newspaper - Sydney Morning Herald 25 Oct 1922 p12.
  4. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
Last Edited10 Oct 2016

Ida Graham Taylor

F, #1071, b. 1871, d. 26 May 1956
Married NameJoseland. 
Birth*1871 Ballarat, VIC, Australia, #B21184 [par John Gibson TAYLOR & Caroline STENT].1 
Marriage*1905 Spouse: Harold Bertram Joseland. St Leonards, NSW, Australia, #M1905/2370.2
 
Widow22 Oct 1922Ida Graham Taylor became a widow upon the death of her husband Harold Bertram Joseland.3 
Death*26 May 1956 Heidelberg, VIC, Australia, #D5754 age 86 [par John Gi TAYLOR & Caroline KENT].4,5 
Death-Notice*28 May 1956JOSELAND. - On May 26, at Heidelberg, Ida Graham, beloved wife of the late Harold, and loving mother of Harold (deceased), Bertram, and Betty (deceased), aged 86 years. -At rest.
JOSELAND. - On May 26, at Heidelberg, Ida Graham, dearly loved aunt of Madge (Mrs. Frank Ross).
JOSELAND. On May 26, at Heidelberg, Ida, loved aunt and friend of Irene Gardner, of Nilma.
Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God. (Matthew, chapter 5.)
In my Father's house are many mansions.
I go to prepare a place for you. (John, chapter 14.)
The Friends of the late Mrs. IDA GRAHAM JOSELAND, of Upper Beaconsfield, are notified that her Funeral will leave Christ Church of England, Berwick, TOMORROW (Tuesday), after a service to commence at 11.30 a.m., for the Berwick Cemetery.
GARNAR & SON PTY. LTD., Dandenong. Phone 308.6 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1931Waverley, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Bertram Holland Joseland.7
1934"Scotscraig", Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Bertram Holland Joseland Dorothy Nora Joseland.8

Grave

  • Plot 4-141-A & 4-142-A, Berwick Cemetery, Berwick, VIC, Australia9

Family

Harold Bertram Joseland b. Jun 1867, d. 22 Oct 1922
Children 1.Harold Joseland b. 26 Dec 1905, d. 9 Jan 1906
 2.Bertram Holland Joseland+ b. 12 May 1910, d. Nov 1997
 3.Dorothy Nora Joseland b. 1912, d. 23 May 1943

Newspaper-Articles

  • 11 Nov 1931, BEACONSFIELD UPPER ... The orchard until recently occupied by Mr Coventry has been sold to Mrs Joseland who intends, in addition to the orchard to run sheep.10
  • 30 Jun 1943, INNER-SPRING Wire Mattress, Blankets, Pillows. Eiderdown, only in use short time. T.B. patient. I. Joseland, Upper Beaconsfield.11

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages "#M1905/2370."
  3. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, ancestry: Pugh, Floud, Farnan Family Tree - owner: verberne186.
  4. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  5. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, ancestry: Pugh, Floud, Farnan Family Tree - owner: verberne186 - mother's suname should be STENT.
  6. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 28 May 1956, p10.
  7. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  8. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934.
  9. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    4-141-A     Joseland     Dorothy     F     30     25/05/1943     1119
    4-142-A     Joseland     Ila (Ida)               29/05/1956     1365
    4-142-A     Joseland     Anthony Bertran M     21     6/03/1962     1455.
  10. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 11 Nov 1931, p10.
  11. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 30 Jun 1943 p5.
Last Edited10 Oct 2016

Bertram Holland Joseland

M, #1072, b. 12 May 1910, d. Nov 1997
Father*Harold Bertram Joseland b. Jun 1867, d. 22 Oct 1922
Mother*Ida Graham Taylor b. 1871, d. 26 May 1956
Birth*12 May 1910 South Yarra, VIC, Australia, #B14834.1 
Birth-Notice*25 May 1910JOSELAND-On the 12th May, at Holland-lodge, Motherwell-street, Hawksburn, to Mr. and Mrs Bertram Joseland - a son.2 
Marriage-Notice*26 Feb 1935Eileen, only daughter of the late Mr. M. Mossop, of London, and Mrs. Mossop, of Wootton avenue, Thornbury, to Bertram Holland, only son of the late Mr. H. B. Joseland, of Chatswood (N.S.W.), and Mrs. Joseland of Scotscraig, Beaconsfield Upper. The marriage will take place shortly.3 
Marriage*Jun 1935 Spouse: Eileen Mary Mossop. St John's Church, Toorak, VIC, Australia, #M4492.4,5
 
Land-UBeac*28 May 1952 GEM-D-15. Transfer from King George to Bertram Holland Joseland. 30a 3r 18p.6 
Land-Note*1 Aug 1952 GEM-D-15: Mortgagee: Ethel Caroline Wolfe - discharged 21 Jan 1953. Mortgagor was Bertram Holland Joseland.7 
Land-UBeac*21 Jan 1953 GEM-D-15 (part). Transfer from Bertram Holland Joseland to William Gustaf Leslie Knapton Joan Crofton Knapton. 20a 1r 5 3/10p.8 
Land-UBeac1 Sep 1959 GEM-D-15 (part), 100 Stoney Creek Road. Transfer from Bertram Holland Joseland to Bruce Rogers.9 
Land-UBeac*5 Jan 1972 PAK-66 l/p 1265 (Lot 8) l/p 45167 Lot 2, 43 St Georges Road. Transfer from Cornelis De Vreugt Pamela Mary De Vreugt to Bertram Holland Joseland Eileen Mary Joseland.10 
Death*Nov 1997 VIC, Australia. 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1931Waverley, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: traveller. With Ida Graham Joseland.11
1934"Scotscraig", Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farmer. With Ida Graham Joseland and Dorothy Nora Joseland.12
1967St Georges Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farmer. With Eileen Mary Joseland. With Barbara Eileen Joseland.13

Grave

  • Plot 7-255, Berwick Cemetery, Berwick, VIC, Australia14

Newspaper-Articles

  • 16 Nov 1933, GENTLEMAN'S Son offers same comfortable home, return services four days week, orchard. Joseland Beaconsfield Upper.15
  • 4 Jul 1935, Joseland—Mossop. MAUVE and yellow chrysanthemums decorated St. John's Church, Toorak, for the wedding of Eileen, only daughter of the late Mr M. Mossop, and of Mrs Mossop, of Woolton Avenue, Thornbury, with Bertram Holland, only son of the late Mr Joseland and of Mrs Joseland, of Scotscraig, Beaconsfield Upper.
    The bride, who was given away by her cousin, the Rev. Maurice Waugh, looked charming in her gown of magnolia satin with a beautiful veil of misty tulle falling from a band of plaited satin caught at one side with a spray of orange blossom. In her arms she carried a sheaf of cream roses, with trails of frangipanni. Her small cousin, Leonard Forr, acted as a little page, wearing a suit of magnolia satin with silver ruchings and silver buckled shoes.
    The bridesmaids were the Misses Betty Joseland and June McNichol (Sydney). Their frocks were of pale green ring velvet, with touches of silver cleverly introduced. Silver tissue picture hats turned off their faces were worn on their heads, and they carried bouquets of mauve and purple gladioli with trails of mauve pansies.
    Mr John Stock was best man, and Mr Paul Wadsworth the groomsman. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Dr. A. Law.
    A reception was held at Grosvenor, Toorak, where wedding breakfast was held, followed by dancing.5
  • 9 Mar 1937, WANTED. Gentleman's son, assist Orchardist, 10/ per week; comfortable home. Joseland, Beaconsfield Upper. Phone 28.16
  • 11 Jan 1939, BERWICK-The most serious fire has been on the Sugarloaf at Beaconsfield Upper where the Upper Beaconsfield brigade under Mr Dave McDonald saved the homes of Messrs Funnell, Richardson, Sulman, Savory, Joseland, and Edwards. Another fire broke out near the forest plantation of Mr H Downing but late this evening was under control.17

Citations

  1. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913 "#B14834."
  2. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 25 May 1910, p1.
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 26 Feb 1935 p1.
  4. [S6] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Marriage Index Victoria 1921-1942.
  5. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk, 4 Jul 1935, p47.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 7615-058 - Bertram Holland Joseland of Beaconsfield Upper Orchardist.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 7615-058 - Bertram Holland Joseland to Ethel Caroline Wolfe.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 7615-058 - William Leslie Knapton Horticulturist and Joan Crofton Knapton Married Woman both of Upper Beaconsfield - C/T 8050-034.
  9. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 7615-058 - C/T 8239-962 - Bruce Rogers of Beaconsfield Upper Greaser.
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 8715-359 - Betram Holland Joseland Curator and Eileen Mary Joseland Married Woman, both of St Georges Road Upper Beaconsfield - joint proprietors.
  11. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931.
  12. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934.
  13. [S101] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903 - 1980.
  14. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    7-255     Joseland     Bertram Holland     M     87     28/11/1997     2683
    7-255     Joseland     Mary Eileen     F     93     12/10/2005     3422.
  15. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 16 Nov 1933 p16.
  16. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 9 Mar 1937 p16.
  17. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 11 Jan 1939 p2.
Last Edited11 Sep 2016

Dorothy Nora Joseland

F, #1073, b. 1912, d. 23 May 1943
Father*Harold Bertram Joseland b. Jun 1867, d. 22 Oct 1922
Mother*Ida Graham Taylor b. 1871, d. 26 May 1956
Birth*1912 Mosman, NSW, Australia, #B45769/1912.1 
Death*23 May 1943 "Scotscraig", Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, #D17272 (Age 30)
died of Tuberculosis.2 
Death-Notice*26 May 1943JOSELAND.-On May 23, at Scots Craig, Beaconsfield Upper, Dorothy Nora (Betty), the dearly beloved daughter of Ida and the late Bertram Joseland, formerly of Chatswood (N.S.W.), and loving sister of Bob, aged 30 years. -Peace, perfect peace.3 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1934"Scotscraig", Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Ida Graham Joseland and Bertram Holland Joseland.4

Grave

  • Plot 4-141-A & 4-142-A, Berwick Cemetery, Berwick, VIC, Australia5

Newspaper-Articles

  • 10 Aug 1935, Engagements: Dorothy Nora (Betty) Joseland, only daughter of the late Mr. H. B. Joseland, of Chatswood (N.S.W.), and of Mrs. Joseland, Scotscraig, Beaconsfield Upper, to Colin Cospatrick Farquhar, only son of the late Captain N. F. Macrae, of Katanning (W.A.), and Mrs. Macrae, of 32 Armadale street, Armadale.6
  • 25 Aug 1939, Subsequent ENGAGEMENTS of Colin Farquar: Joan Mildred, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. McIntosh, of 40 Verdant avenue, Toorak, to Colin Cospatrick Farquhar, only son of Mrs. A. M. A. Macrae, of 712 Toorak road, Malvern, and of the late Captain N. F. Macrae, of Dunbar, Katanning (W.A.)7
  • 26 May 1943, MISS BETTY JOSELAND
    AFTER an illness lasting four years, Dorothy Nora (“Betty”) Joseland, of “Scots Craig,” Upper Beaconsfield, died at the early age of 30 years, on May 23. Born in NSW., she had been been a resident of Upper Beaconsfield for many years, and was very much respected in the district. Her remains were laid to rest in the Church of England portion of the Berwick cemetery yesterday, Rev. E. Panelli officiating. Many floral tributes showed how much the grief of deceased’s mother and brother is shared. W. J. Garnar and Sons conducted the funeral, which was private.8

Citations

  1. [S7] Registry of NSW Births Deaths and Marriages.
  2. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985 "reg. Berwick."
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 26 May 1943 p2.
  4. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934.
  5. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    4-141-A     Joseland     Dorothy     F     30     25/05/1943     1119
    4-142-A     Joseland     Ila (Ida)               29/05/1956     1365
    4-142-A     Joseland     Anthony Bertran M     21     6/03/1962     1455.
  6. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 10 Aug 1935 p19.
  7. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 25 Aug 1939 p8.
  8. [S218] Newspaper - The Dandenong Journal (1927-1954) "26 May 1943, p10."
Last Edited10 Oct 2016

Eileen Mary Mossop

F, #1074, b. Mar 1912, d. 8 Oct 2005
Father*Moses Mossop b. 1875, d. 17 Aug 1913
Mother*Maud Beatrice Elizabeth Sampson b. 1874, d. Aug 1951
Married NameJoseland. 
Birth*Mar 1912 Bromley, Kent, England, Mar Q [Bromley] 2a 1082 - as Mary E. MOSSOP.1 
Marriage-Notice26 Feb 1935Eileen, only daughter of the late Mr. M. Mossop, of London, and Mrs. Mossop, of Wootton avenue, Thornbury, to Bertram Holland, only son of the late Mr. H. B. Joseland, of Chatswood (N.S.W.), and Mrs. Joseland of Scotscraig, Beaconsfield Upper. The marriage will take place shortly.2 
Marriage*Jun 1935 Spouse: Bertram Holland Joseland. St John's Church, Toorak, VIC, Australia, #M4492.3,4
 
(Transfer to) Land-UBeac5 Jan 1972 PAK-66 l/p 1265 (Lot 8) l/p 45167 Lot 2, 43 St Georges Road. Transfer from Cornelis De Vreugt Pamela Mary De Vreugt to Bertram Holland Joseland Eileen Mary Joseland.5 
WidowNov 1997She became a widow upon the death of her husband Bertram Holland Joseland
Death*8 Oct 2005 VIC, Australia.6 
Death-Notice*10 Oct 2005JOSELAND. - Eileen. Passed away peacefully on Oct. 8, 2005, aged 93 years. Loving wife of Bob (dec). Precious and devoted mother and mother-in-law of Barry and Tony (both dec.), Peter and Marion, Barbara, Audrey and John, Suzanne and Peter, Angeline and Ray. Loving and caring Grandma of her 16 grandchildren and 16 great grandchildren. Loved, cherished and never forgotten. In God's loving care.6 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
1967St Georges Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Bertram Holland Joseland. With Barbara Eileen Joseland.7

Grave

  • Plot 7-255, Berwick Cemetery, Berwick, VIC, Australia8

Newspaper-Articles

  • 4 Jul 1935, Joseland—Mossop. MAUVE and yellow chrysanthemums decorated St. John's Church, Toorak, for the wedding of Eileen, only daughter of the late Mr M. Mossop, and of Mrs Mossop, of Woolton Avenue, Thornbury, with Bertram Holland, only son of the late Mr Joseland and of Mrs Joseland, of Scotscraig, Beaconsfield Upper.
    The bride, who was given away by her cousin, the Rev. Maurice Waugh, looked charming in her gown of magnolia satin with a beautiful veil of misty tulle falling from a band of plaited satin caught at one side with a spray of orange blossom. In her arms she carried a sheaf of cream roses, with trails of frangipanni. Her small cousin, Leonard Forr, acted as a little page, wearing a suit of magnolia satin with silver ruchings and silver buckled shoes.
    The bridesmaids were the Misses Betty Joseland and June McNichol (Sydney). Their frocks were of pale green ring velvet, with touches of silver cleverly introduced. Silver tissue picture hats turned off their faces were worn on their heads, and they carried bouquets of mauve and purple gladioli with trails of mauve pansies.
    Mr John Stock was best man, and Mr Paul Wadsworth the groomsman. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Dr. A. Law.
    A reception was held at Grosvenor, Toorak, where wedding breakfast was held, followed by dancing.4

Citations

  1. [S9] Free BMD. Index. Online @ https://www.freebmd.org.uk/.
  2. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 26 Feb 1935 p1.
  3. [S6] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Marriage Index Victoria 1921-1942.
  4. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk, 4 Jul 1935, p47.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 8715-359 - Betram Holland Joseland Curator and Eileen Mary Joseland Married Woman, both of St Georges Road Upper Beaconsfield - joint proprietors.
  6. [S13] Newspaper - Herald Sun "10 Oct 2005 - viewed online 13 May 2014."
  7. [S101] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903 - 1980.
  8. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    7-255     Joseland     Bertram Holland     M     87     28/11/1997     2683
    7-255     Joseland     Mary Eileen     F     93     12/10/2005     3422.
Last Edited10 Oct 2016
 

NOTE

Many family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.