Alice Elfrida Sumner

F, #20733, b. 1858, d. 11 Oct 1923
Father*Theodotus John Sumner b. 1820, d. 1884
Mother*Sarah Jones Peers
Married NameRyan. 
Birth*1858 Merri Creek, VIC, Australia, #B461/1858.1 
Marriage*5 Jul 1883 Spouse: Charles Snodgrass Ryan. Christ Church, Brunswick, VIC.
 
Death*11 Oct 1923 Koblenz, Germany. 
Death-Notice*13 Oct 1923RYAN. At Coblenz, Germany (suddenly), Alice Elfrida, the dearly beloved wife of Charles Ryan.2 

Family

Charles Snodgrass Ryan
Child 1.Baroness Ethel Marian Sumner 'Maie' Ryan b. 13 Mar 1891, d. 20 Jan 1983

Newspaper-Articles

  • 18 Oct 1923: DEATH OF LADY ALICE RYAN. LONDON, October 10.
    The death has occurred at Coblenz of Lady Alice Ryan, wife of Major-General Sir Charles Snodgrass Ryan, of Melbourne. Lady Ryan was a daughter of Mr. T. J. Summer, M.L.C., of Victoria.3
  • 5 Dec 1923: Lady Ryan's Estate. An estate sworn at £16,676, consisting wholly of personalty, was left by the late Lady Ryan, wife of Sir Charles Ryan, surgeon, Collins street. At the time of her death Lady Ryan lived with her husband at "Mayfair," Domain road, South Yarra. She died on October 11. Under a will dated November 24, 1919, and a codicil, Lady Ryan left her estate to her husband in trust for her children, and Joan Alice Smith, a godchild of the testatrix, is a beneficiary in the sum of £100.4

Citations

  1. [S26] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (Births) (online).
  2. [S11] Newspaper - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 13 Oct 1923, p13
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1999169
  3. [S14] Newspaper - The Brisbane Courier (Qld.), Thu 18 Oct 1923, p7
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article20639938
  4. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic.), Wed 5 Dec 1923, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article243499004
Last Edited3 Oct 2020

Cecil Edgar Hopgood

M, #20735, b. 1882, d. 6 Nov 1966
Father*Robert Alfred Hopgood b. Sep 1853, d. 10 Jul 1889
Mother*Mary Ann Ley b. 9 Jan 1854, d. 30 Aug 1936
Probate (Will)* 658/161. Cecil Edgar HOPGOOD Date of grant: 19 Jul 1967; Date of death: 06 Nov 1960; Occupation: Retired; Residence: Berwick.1 
Birth*1882 Lorne, VIC, Australia, #B3800.2 
Marriage*9 Jun 1903 Spouse: Mary Josephine Murnane. Christ Church, Geelong, VIC, Australia, #M1964.2,3
 
Criminal*2 Apr 1908 Hopgood, Cecil E: No. 31687 - Released 12 Feb 1909.4 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelJun 1909 Sailing with Mary Josephine Hopgood Irene Cecilia Hopgood to New Zealand. Ship Moeraki sailing from Melbourne
Age 32.5 
Military*1916Enlisted for military service: Templeton, Paparus, Canterbury, New Zealand, Farm Manager - On New Zealand Army WWI Reserve Rolls, 1916-1917.6 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelOct 1921 To Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Paloona sailing from New Zealand
Age 39 (Mr C Hopgood.)7 
WidowerSep 1960Cecil Edgar Hopgood became a widower upon the death of his wife Mary Josephine Murnane.8 
Death*6 Nov 1966 Berwick, VIC, Australia, #D24979 (Age 84) [par Robert Alfred HOPGOOD & Mary Ann LEY].9 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1911 - 1914"Broomfield", Yaldhurst Road, Yaldhurst, Canterbury, New ZealandOccupation: farm hand. With Mary Josephine Hopgood.10
1919Church Street, Templeton, Canterbury, New ZealandOccupation: farm hand. With Mary Josephine Hopgood.10
1928Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farmer. With Mary Josephine Hopgood.11
1934Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farmer. With Mary Josephine Hopgood. With Irene Cecilia Hopgood.12
1942Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: farmer. With Mary Josephine Hopgood.13

Grave

  • Thomas Simmons Lawn, Row BH, Grave 51, Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Springvale, VIC, Australia14

Family

Mary Josephine Murnane b. 1878, d. Sep 1960
Children 1.Irene Cecilia Hopgood b. 1908, d. 3 May 2004
 2.Albert William Hopgood+ b. 13 Aug 1915, d. 3 Nov 1998
 3.Dorothy Mary Hopgood b. 1921, d. Jun 2006

Newspaper-Articles

  • 3 Apr 1908: LARCENY OF PRODUCE. Three brothers named Cecil Edgar, Alfred Robert and Wilfred Ernest Hopgood, were charged with stealing on or about February 10th, 18 bags oats and three bags of wheat, the property of August Leibhardt, of Waurn Ponds; and a further charge of receiving was prefer red against Wilfred Ernest Hopgood. Cecil and Alfred Hopgood pleaded guilty to receiving, and Wilfred Hopgood not guilty to both charges.
    Mr. Wanliss (instructed by Whyte, Just and Moore) appeared for the accused.
    The following jury was empannelled on the case of Wilfred Hopgood:—W. A. Toombs (foreman), Wm. C. Holt, Sydney Morgan, H. T. Sutterby, Wilson Birrell, G. W. Eastwood, Geo. Falconer, A. A. Lyons, Andrew Flemming, W. G. Mirrell, Chas. Adsen and Jos. Smith.
    Mr. Gurner, in outlining the case against W. E. Hopgood, said the jury would have to consider chiefly the receiving count.
    August Leibhardt, farmer at Pettavel, deposed that he had a farm at Waurn Ponds. From this farm, on the 11th February, 18 bags of oats and three bags of wheat went missing. There were two sets of tracks of a waggonette near the stack. There had been two horses in one vehicle, and one horse in the other, and in the pair the off side horse was unshod. With Plainclothes-constable Gleeson, he traced the vehicles as far as Marshalltown. On the 12th, with Gleeson and Loughron, he went to Cecil Hopgood's place at Barwon Heads, and identified two bags of wheat as his pro perty. With Gleeson, he also went to Wilfred Hopgood's place at Marshalltown and saw 18 bags of oats. They were con cealed beneath sheaves. The oats corres ponded in appearance and quality with witness' grain, as also did the bags.
    To Mr. Wanliss: He got back all but one bag of wheat.
    Henry Kurzman, son-in-law of the previous witness, gave corroborative evidence.
    To Mr. Wanliss: Another count of the bags showed that three bags of wheat were stolen. The oats, were recovered in a wooden shed, which was not too open.
    Plainclothes-constable Gleeson deposed that on the 11th of February he observed tracks leading from Leibhardt's. He traced the wheel marks to Marshalltown within a mile of the accused's place. On the 12th of February, accompanied by Constable Loughron, he obtained a statement from Cecil Hopgood, and then went to Wilfred's place. In a shed in the yard he observed what appeared to be a stack of sheaf hay. He pulled the stack down, and found 18 bags of oats concealed underneath. He went for Hopgood, and on the drive home witnessed mentioned the theft to accused, and asked if he knew anything about it. He said, "I have a suspicion," and continuing, said "My brothers, Cecil and Alfred, brought two loads of oats to my place on Monday night. I had bought 10 bags of oats from Cecil ; I thought they were bringing that. I did not know they had stolen it. Witness told him that his two brothers admitted taking accused's horses and driving to Leib hardt's, where they stole nine bags of oats and two bags of wheat, and that he was present when they arrived and assisted them to put it into his shed. Witness told him of a second load they had put into his shed. He admitted it was true, but said Cecil said he was not taking any risk, and did not tell him it was stolen till the next morning. He said Cecil and he had covered it over with sheaves. He made a statement which witness took down at his dictation. Each of the accused brothers admitted the truth of the other's statement. Cecil's statement admitted the visits to Leibhardt's and said Wilfred helped them to unload the first load. Wilfred was present when Alfred suggested going to Leibhardt's for the grain. Accused's statement showed that he as sisted to unload the first load, and in the morning they said they had stolen it. He said, "I hope it won't get me into trouble. I've got a Government job." Cecil said there was no risk. Alfred's statement also admitted taking the grain, from Leibhardt's.
    To Mr. Wanliss: In about 30 hours he had followed them up, measured the wheels, discovered the peculiarity of the hoof, and crowned all by getting their separate statements. He was satisfied with the work done. After he got Cecil's statement be knew pretty well how the land lay. Each gave his statement volun tarily and freely. He made no sugges tion. The language used would not be exactly the same. There might be a word or two be put down. It would be difficult to give the statement as accused made it. He said to accused that one of the horses was unshod. He had to put the words in to make it readable.
    Mr. Wanliss: It was wanted for evidence, and he made it to suit.
    Further examined, he denied that the dictated statement was licked into shape by him. Where he referred to the 18 bags of oats found covered in my shed.''
    Some would probably be his words. The witness was closely examined by Mr. Wanliss in regard to the language of the other statements.
    To Mr. Gurner: Each statement was read over to each accused before being signed.
    To His Honor: It was a true record of what the men said.
    This closed the case for the Crown, and Mr. Wanliss, addressing the jury, said, Gleeson apparently thought he had effected a clever capture and having seen the two first men, he built up the rest and got statements from accused and his brother. But because the circumstances were suspicious or accused's explanation improbable, did not mean that he was guilty. The prisoner's explanation was that he required oats from his brother to sow 10 or 12 acres. When on February 10th, Alfred said they would go and get the oats, he thought it referred to his order. As a matter of fact, the two brothers had arranged to go to Leibhardt's and steal the oats. When they came back he helped to un load them, thinking they had been brought from his mother's. He went to bed, and that was the last he knew of their movements that night. Next morning, Cecil told him, they had got a second load, and stacked them in the shed because, it was handy to his fallow land. Some time after he was informed that they had stolen the oats, and dismissed it from his mind as a joke.
    The accused on oath deposed that he was a line repairer. A few days prior to February 10th he told Cecil he wanted 10 bags of oats for seed. On February 10th Cecil had tea with witness, and the question of oats cropped up. His brother Alfred suggested going for the oats then.
    On resuming after lunch, accused detailed the conversation at the interview with Gleeson, who first mentioned the robbery, and asked if accused know any thing about it. He said, "Well, I have a suspicion." His suspicion was first arous ed by what Dan Edwards told him. Witness said Cecil and Alfred had brought two load of oats to his place on the Mon day ovening. Gleeson asked, "Do you know what Cecil says?" then telling him about the oats and wheat. Witness said he knew nothing about the wheat. On arrival at witness' property, Gleeson ask ed for a statement. He did not put down what witness said, but words of the same meaning.
    To Mr Gurner: He was not near Leibhardt's place on the Tuesday, and he did not know that Leibhardt had stuff stack ed on his land. He did not see his bro thers harness up the second time. The oats were partly put under the tin sheets which had been put on the shingle roof to make it weather proof. He threw some of the sheaves on top. He knew there were more bags than he ordered, but Cecil said he had brought some for his fallowed land near by. "He also said he had "shook" them.
    Cecil Hopgood deposed that he agreed to sell his brother 10 bags of oats. Alfred had told witness that Leibhardt's would probably be threshing oats at Waurn Ponds, and suggested going to get some when threshed. Witness agreed, but told nobody. Accused Wilfred did not know. On Monday, February 10th, on returning from Geelong, he had tea at Wilfred's house. At 8 p.m. Alfred suggested going to Leibhardt's for oats. Wilfred knew witness had oats at his mother's place, but they did not obtain them there. They did not tell Wilfred where the oats came from, nor did he see them return with a second load. They put the lot in the shed. Next morning, at about 6 o'clock. Wilfred came out and asked what witness was doing. He said, "I'm covering the oats." He also said he had been for another load to his mother's, and intended to leave them there. When he was covering the oats, he said they had come from Leibhardt's. He told him jokingly. They covered the oats with sheaves to keep out the weather. Plain-clothes-constable Gleeson "made up" his statement, and he answered it. (Laughter). He asked questions and witness answered them. He did not say Wilfred was there.
    To Mr. Gurner: He was asked to sign the statement as true, and did so. No reason was mentioned for going for the oats at 8 p.m. The oats were covered by sheaves to a depth of about two feet.
    He did not tell Mr. Kurzman "it is all Wilfred's fault; he planned it, he was working on the line out there and knew where the stuff was." He did not tell Gleeson that he had sold oats to his brother, whom he had led to understand that the oats were coming from his mother's.
    Alfred Hopgood gave corroborative evidence, and said he suggested going for the oats, which Wilfred thought were to be obtained at their mother's.
    To Mr. Gurner: He did not know that
    Leibhardts had threshed. They went there on the chance of it having been done. He did not suggest the theft to Wilfred, though he had lived with him for five weeks. He thought Cecil was the more likely thief. There was no reason for going at that hour of the night.
    He did not know of the sale of oats to Wilfred until after the theft.
    To Mr. Wanliss: He knew his brother Cecil more intimately than Wilfred, who was much older.
    Kurzman, recalled, said Cecil had told him that Wilfred had planned the theft.
    Mr. Wanliss, addressing the jury, commented adversely on the colored nature of the statements obtained by Gleeson, and his attitude in the witness box.
    Mr. Gurner, addressing the jury for the Crown, emphasised that the prisoner had every reason to tell an untruth, be cause it meant his liberty. The two brothers were self-confessed thieves, and did their best to pull one chestnut out of the fire.
    Addressing His Honor on behalf of Cecil and Alfred Hopgood, Mr. Wanliss pointed out that through the death of their father, 18 years ago, the boys had been left with a struggling mother, and had not been brought up as well as might have been desired. Neither had been in trouble before, and Cecil had managed to get married and had a wife and one young child depending on him. Alfred was the only assistance the mother had on her farm, and altogether it was a most unfortunate case.
    A. T. Curran. County Court bailiff, gave evidence that Cecil Hopgood was a hard working man, and to witness' knowledge of good character.
    The case was adjourned till 10 a.m. the following day, when His Honor will charge the jury. Wilfred Ernest Hopgood Alfred Robert Hopgood15
  • 4 Apr 1908: GENERAL SESSIONS. The charges of larceny and receiving preferred against Wilfred Hopgood, a railway ganger, opened the second day's proceedings at the General Sessions yesterday. His Honor addressing the jury somewhat adversely. On the count of stealing, they found Hopgood not guilty, but could not agree, after being locked up for six hours, as to his guilt or otherwise on the charge of receiving, and the prisoner was remanded to the Supreme Court on May 7th, bail being renewed. This morning, Cecil and Alfred Hopgood and John Jas. Tully will be brought up for sentence ; and the County Court list will then be entered upon. Wilfred Ernest Hopgood Alfred Robert Hopgood16
  • 6 Apr 1908: GEELONG GENERAL SESSIONS. SENTENCES PASSED. GEELONG, Saturday
    Judge Chomley passed sentences on Saturday on the persons convicted during the sessions. Cecil and Alfred Hopgood, who had pleaded guilty to having stolen 18 bags of oats and three bags of wheat from August Liebhardt, farmer, of Pettavel, in February last, were then placed in the dock. His Honor, sentenced both of the accused to 12 months imprisonment, but the sentence on Alfred Hopgood was suspended on sureties being found for his future good behavior. Alfred Robert Hopgood17
  • 8 May 1908: ALLEGED RECEIVING. Owing to the jury being unable to agree on the first occasion, Wilfred Ernest Hopgood was again brought up on bail, on a charge of knowingly receiving stolen property on 10th February.
    The following jury were empannelled: —Messrs. Edward Wilks Gibson; (foreman); David Bone, Walter Galbraith, Patrick Joseph Callan, John Hammond Boyd, William Maxwell Barned, Albert Charles Bartlett, William Robert Jarman, John Henry Graves, George Conrad Bartlett, Henry Winstanley, Frederick Lionel Brockwell.
    Mr Maxwell (instructed by Messrs. Whyte, Just and Moore) represented the defence, and Mr. Gurner prosecuted. In outlining the case, the latter said that accused's two brothers, Cecil and Alfred Hopgood had already pleaded guilty to stealing the bags, which bad been discovered on prisoner's property at Mar shalltown. He described the circum stances of the case, showing that the police had visited prisoner's property, where they discovered what was believed to be several bags of produce stolen from Mr. August Leibhardt's land at Waurn Ponds.
    Evidence was given by August Leibhardt, Henry Kurzman and Plainclothes Constable Gleeson and Constable Lough ron, similar to that already reported at the first hearing.
    Mr. Maxwell briefly outlined the case for the defence, and said that, although the bags may have been found on accused's promises, he was quite unaware of the fact that they had been stolen. As a matter of fact, he believed that the bags bad been brought from his mother's place, and he did not have any idea that his brothers had stolen them from Mr. Leibhardt's land.
    Accused, in his own defence, said he had been a line repairer for the Railway department during the past eight years. His good conduct had never before been called into question. Witness, said at the time of the theft he hd no idea that Mr. Leibhardt had thrashed oats on his land. The oats, which were brought to his place by his two brothers, witness fully believed to be from his mother's place, as he was to receive some from there. It was about 11 o'clock at night when his brothers brought the bags and placed them in the shed. Witness did not know, until some time later in the week that a second load had been brought to his place. When his brothers had brought the bags to his place one of them said, "We shook them." Witness treated the remark as a joke, and replied, "I hope you didn't, because I have a Government job."
    To Mr. Gurner: His reply regarding the Government job was also made in a joking manner. After addresses by counsel and the Chief Justice's summing up, the jury retired at 4.5 p.m to consider the evidence. They returned into court at eight minutes to 6 o'clock, at the in stance of the Chief Justice, who asked if he could assist them in any way by supplying them with information regarding the case.
    The foreman, however, announced that there seemed little chance of an agreement, and it was decided that they should be locked up until the expiration of six hours, viz., 10.5 p.m., at which time the Chief Justiceo said he would again appear in court.
    At five minutes past eight the jury notified that they had come to an agreement. The Chief Justice was sent for, and a verdict of not guilty was entered up. Wilfred Ernest Hopgood Alfred Robert Hopgood18
  • 27 Nov 1929: MOTOR TRUCK AND TRAM COLLIDE IN CITY Dummy Derailed But Nobody Hurt
    Tramway passengers had a narrow escape when a motor truck driven by Cecil E. Hopgood, dairy farmer, of Beaconsfield, came into collision with a cable tram at the corner of Church Lane and Bourke Street this afternoon.
    The dummy was derailed by the force of the impact, and the front stove in. Though the dummy was crowded with passengers nobody was hurt. A woman who was sitting in the front of the dummy, which struck the side of the motor truck, had a remarkable escape. Tramway traffic in Bourke Street was held up for 25 minutes.19
  • 25 Oct 1940: MILK BOARD OFFENCES Seven Charges Against Cranbourne Dairy Farmer
    A case of interest to dairy farmers supplying the metropolitan milk market was heard on Wednesday, October 16, at the Cranbourne Court. Inspectors E. C. Hill and W. Buttcher, of the Milk Board, submitted evidence for the prosecution.
    Cecil Edgar Hopgood, dairy farmer, of Beaconsfield and Cranbourne, was proceeded against under the Milk Board Acts for failure to enter daily his milk record book, furnishing false and incomplete; returns to the Milk Board, and selling milk to a metropolitan retail dairyman at a price less than determined by the Milk Board. In all seven charges were laid. Fines amounting to £6, with £12/16/- costs were inposed; a stay of 14 days was granted.20
  • 7 Feb 1951: Beaconsfield Man Attacked By Bull
    LAST TUESDAY while Mr. C. E. Hopgood, of Beaconsfield, was removing a cow from the bull paddock at his farm, his dairy Shorthorn bull atcacked him. savagely and put him out of the paddock with three broken ribs and extensive bruises.
    This is the second time that Mr. Hopgood has been attacked by the same bull and each time he has had a very lucky escape.21
  • 1 Jul 1953: Beaconsfield Couple's Golden Wedding
    POPULAR and highly esteemed residents of Beaconsfield for the past 33 years, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Hopgood were guests of honor at a happy social given them by members of their family, in the Beaconsfield Hall on June 25th, to celebrate their golden wedding anniversary. There were about 80 guests present, some of them travelling 40 miles to be there. Mr. Jim Parkes was chairman and among speakers to extend congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. Hopgood on their 50 years of happy married life were: Mr. J. W. H. Wilson, an old family friend; Mr. A. G. Poole (on behalf of neighbors), Mr. D. Cole (business people), Mr. A. W. Hopgood (family), Mr. W. E. Hopgood (brother). The toast of the anniversary couple was proposed by Mr. Jim Anderson, and both Mr. and Mrs. Hopgood were given an ovation when they responded, thanking all for their good wishes and lovely presents. Artists who contributed to the enjoyable musical programme included, Cecil, a grandson (pianoaccordeon); Mrs. Brockwell Cpiano-accordeon); Mrs. Jack Adamson (piano); Mr. and Mrs. Barby, “Snooky” Barby, Mrs. Vic Hopgood, Mr. Excell and Mi’. W. Hopgood (songs). Four granddaughters helped Edna Donegan to tend the supper tables.22

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/ P4 unit 4125, item 658/161
    VPRS 7591/ P3 unit 702, item 658/161.
  2. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  3. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Clissold9.
  4. [S34] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Central Register of Male Prisoners
    VPRS 515/ P1 item 60, record Page 158.
  5. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  6. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, New Zealand Army WWI Reserve Rolls, 1916-1917.
  7. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), #384.
  8. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online) "#D24555/1960 - Place of birth BARWON HEADS."
  9. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online) "Place of birth Deans Marsh."
  10. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, New Zealand Electoral Roll - Cecil is listed as Charles Edgar Hopgood.
  11. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  12. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934 "Only Irene states address as Soldiers Road."
  13. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  14. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery.
  15. [S14] Newspaper - Geelong Advertiser (Vic.), Fri 3 Apr 1908, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article148915388
  16. [S14] Newspaper - Geelong Advertiser (Vic.), Sat 4 Apr 1908, p2
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article148915431
  17. [S14] Newspaper - The Ballarat Star (Vic.), Mon 6 Apr 1908, p6
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article205460943
  18. [S14] Newspaper - Geelong Advertiser (Vic.), Fri 8 May 1908, p5
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article148919268
  19. [S14] Newspaper - The Herald (Melbourne, Vic.), Wed 27 Nov 1929, p7
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article244208056
  20. [S14] Newspaper - Standard (Frankston, Vic.), Fri 25 Oct 1940, p4
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article75037173
  21. [S218] Newspaper - The Dandenong Journal (Vic.) The Dandenong Journal (Vic.), Wed 7 Feb 1951, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222350349
  22. [S218] Newspaper - The Dandenong Journal (Vic.) The Dandenong Journal (Vic.), Wed 1 Jul 1953, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article215820309
Last Edited19 Apr 2021

Mary Josephine Murnane

F, #20736, b. 1878, d. Sep 1960
Married NameHopgood. 
Birth*1878 
Marriage*9 Jun 1903 Spouse: Cecil Edgar Hopgood. Christ Church, Geelong, VIC, Australia, #M1964.1,2
 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelJun 1909 Sailing with Cecil Edgar Hopgood Irene Cecilia Hopgood to New Zealand. Ship Moeraki sailing from Melbourne
Age 37.3 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelApr 1922 Sailing with Alfred Robert Hopgood, Irene Cecilia Hopgood, Albert William Hopgood, Dorothy Mary Hopgood to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Paloona II sailing from New Zealand
Age 43 (Mrs M J Hopgood.)4 
Death*Sep 1960 Beaconsfield, VIC, Australia, #D24555 (Age 82) [par John MURNANE & Catherine DOUGHINE].5 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1911 - 1914"Broomfield", Yaldhurst Road, Yaldhurst, Canterbury, New ZealandOccupation: married. With Cecil Edgar Hopgood.6
1919Church Street, Templeton, Canterbury, New ZealandOccupation: married. With Cecil Edgar Hopgood.6
1928Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Cecil Edgar Hopgood.7
1934Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Cecil Edgar Hopgood. With Irene Cecilia Hopgood.8
1942Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: home duties. With Cecil Edgar Hopgood.9

Grave

  • Thomas Simmons Lawn, Row BH, Grave 51, Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Springvale, VIC, Australia10

Family

Cecil Edgar Hopgood b. 1882, d. 6 Nov 1966
Children 1.Irene Cecilia Hopgood b. 1908, d. 3 May 2004
 2.Albert William Hopgood+ b. 13 Aug 1915, d. 3 Nov 1998
 3.Dorothy Mary Hopgood b. 1921, d. Jun 2006

Citations

  1. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  2. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Clissold9.
  3. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  4. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), #385.
  5. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online) "#D24555/1960 - Place of birth BARWON HEADS."
  6. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, New Zealand Electoral Roll - Cecil is listed as Charles Edgar Hopgood.
  7. [S128] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1928.
  8. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934 "Only Irene states address as Soldiers Road."
  9. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  10. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery.
Last Edited19 Apr 2021

Albert William Hopgood

M, #20738, b. 13 Aug 1915, d. 3 Nov 1998
Father*Cecil Edgar Hopgood b. 1882, d. 6 Nov 1966
Mother*Mary Josephine Murnane b. 1878, d. Sep 1960
Birth*13 Aug 1915 Christchurch, New Zealand, #B27094/1915.1 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelApr 1922 Sailing with Mary Josephine Hopgood, Alfred Robert Hopgood, Irene Cecilia Hopgood, Dorothy Mary Hopgood to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Paloona II sailing from New Zealand
Age 6 (Master A Hopgood.)2 
Marriage*1935 Spouse: Emily Lambden. VIC, Australia, #M9536.3
 
Military*Enlisted for military service: HOPGOOD, ALBERT WILLIAM Australian Army - Service Number V401503 - Date and place of Birth 13 Aug 1915 CHRISTCHURCH, NZ - Date of Enlistment Unknown - Locality on Enlistment CLYDE, VIC - Place of Enlistment 52A, VIC - Next of Kin HOPGOOD, EMILY - Date of Discharge 9 Oct 1945 as Private with 10 BATTALION VOLUNTEER DEFENCE CORPS.4 
Widower1970Albert William Hopgood became a widower upon the death of his wife Emily Lambden.5 
Marriage* Spouse: Jean Maude McLean. As TAYLOR.6
 
Death*3 Nov 1998 VIC, Australia.6 

Grave

  • C E Bolingbroke Lawn, Row W, Grave 38, Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Springvale, VIC, Australia, In loving memory of Albert William Hopgood died 3rd November 1998, aged 83 years beloved husband of Emily (Dolly (dec) & Jean (dec). Loved father of Ernie, Cecil, Daphne, Joan, Shirley, Valerie & Maureen. Rest in peace.
    In loving memory of Emily Hopgood died 22 July 1970, loved wife of Albert. Dear mother of Ernie, Cecil, Daphne, Joan, Shirley, Valerie & Maureen. So sadly missed.6

Newspaper-Articles

  • 12 Jul 1930: Letter Exchange. Albert Hopgood, Beaconsfield, Victoria, would like a pen-friend in Tasmania or South Australia, He is fifteen.7

Citations

  1. [S10] New Zealand Government Birth, Death & Marriage Indexes.
  2. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), #385.
  3. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  4. [S30] Nominal Roll, Australian War Memorial - WWII, http://www.ww2roll.gov.au/
  5. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online) "#D18580/1970 Place of birth Hedley."
  6. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery.
  7. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic.), Sat 12 Jul 1930, p45
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article223323779
Last Edited19 Apr 2021

Emily Lambden

F, #20739, b. 1913, d. 1970
Married NameHopgood. 
Birth*1913 
Marriage*1935 Spouse: Albert William Hopgood. VIC, Australia, #M9536.1
 
Death*1970 Berwick, VIC, Australia, #D18580 (Age 57) [par Thomas William LAMBDEN & Emma Unity FOOTE].2 

Grave

  • C E Bolingbroke Lawn, Row W, Grave 38, Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Springvale, VIC, Australia, In loving memory of Albert William Hopgood died 3rd November 1998, aged 83 years beloved husband of Emily (Dolly (dec) & Jean (dec). Loved father of Ernie, Cecil, Daphne, Joan, Shirley, Valerie & Maureen. Rest in peace.
    In loving memory of Emily Hopgood died 22 July 1970, loved wife of Albert. Dear mother of Ernie, Cecil, Daphne, Joan, Shirley, Valerie & Maureen. So sadly missed.3

Newspaper-Articles

  • 20 Jul 1949: CLYDE. PERSONAL: Friends of Mrs. A. Hopgood, of Clyde, are glad to know that she is home again after her recent serious illness.4

Citations

  1. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  2. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online) "#D18580/1970 Place of birth Hedley."
  3. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery.
  4. [S218] Newspaper - The Dandenong Journal (Vic.) The Dandenong Journal (Vic.), Wed 20 Jul 1949, p6
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article222211563
Last Edited19 Apr 2021

Jean Maude McLean

F, #20743, d. 3 Dec 1994
Note* Springvale botanical cemetery H N Featonby Lawn, Row J, Grave 31
Jean Maude Hopgood Buried 07/12/1994 & Ewen George Taylor Buried 12/04/1966.1 
Married NameHopgood. 
Marriage*1934 VIC, Australia, #M2183 married George Ewen TAYLOR.2
 
Marriage* Spouse: Albert William Hopgood. As TAYLOR.1
 
Death*3 Dec 19941 

Citations

  1. [S47] Index of burials in the cemetery of Springvale Botanical Cemetery.
  2. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
Last Edited19 Apr 2021
 

NOTE

Some family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.

Some individuals may be featured because members of their family were associated with the Upper Beaconsfield area, even though they themselves never lived here.