Hannah Theresa (Dot) Preece

F, #2701, b. 1892, d. 18 Apr 1939
Father*Joseph Webb Preece b. 24 Apr 1862, d. 9 Dec 1912
Mother*Louisa Eudey b. 1866, d. 14 Jul 1952
Married NameMcKay. 
Birth*1892 Brunswick East, VIC, Australia, #B1614.1 
Land-UBeac*3 Aug 1915 PAK-70 l/p 6686 (Lot 4). Transfer from Louisa Preece to Hannah Theresa (Dot) Preece. 9a 3r 19 1/2p.2 
Land-UBeac*12 Sep 1919 PAK-70 l/p 6686 (Lot 4). Transfer from Hannah Theresa (Dot) Preece to James Henry Topping, John Stanley Topping, Eric Joseph Caudwell. 9a 3r 19p.3 
Marriage*1 Sep 1920 Spouse: John Maxwell Holmes McKay. Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #M10937.4
 
Marriage-Notice*10 Sep 1920McKAY—PREECE.—On the 1st September, at Melbourne, John Holmes only son of Mr and Mrs James McKay, Wordsworth street, St. Kilda, to Therese (Dot) eldest daughter of Mrs Preece, Moonyah, St .Kilda road, and the late Mr J. W. Preece.5 
Death*18 Apr 1939 At Sea. 
Death-Notice*21 Apr 1939McKAY. — On the 18th April, at sea, Therese (Dot) beloved daughter of Mrs. L. and the late Joseph Precce, and dearly loved sister of Maude (Mrs. Howard Dyke).6 

Citations

  1. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901.
  2. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3886-191 - see C/T 3906-192 Hannah Theresa Preece of Toorak Road, South Camberwell, Spinster.
  3. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3906-192 - Hannah Theresa Preece to James Henry Topping and John Stanley Topping both of Como Parade Mentone Painters and Eric Joseph Caudwell of Latrobe Street Mentone Builder - proprietors as tenants in common in equal shares - C/T 4236-158.
  4. [S4] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Great War Index Victoria 1914-1920.
  5. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Fri 10 Sep 1920, p1
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4584666
  6. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Fri 21 Apr 1939, p10
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12119920
Last Edited26 May 2018

William Arthur Buckleigh

M, #2704, b. 1899, d. 31 Oct 1974
William Arthur BUCKLEIGH
(1899-1974)
Probate (Will)* William A Buckleigh. Farmer. Dalyston. 31 Oct 1974. 788/933.1       
Place in Upper Beac* Council adopted a recommendation of John Milligan to name a road running off Telegraph Road, Buckleigh Lane, after Bill Buckleigh. The road reservation is adjacent to the property once owned by this colourful former resident. 
Birth*1899 Canada.2,3 
Marriage*1925 Spouse: Jessie Maud Goff. VIC, Australia, #M7021.4
 
Note*1931 No land ownership found before 1944. 
Land-UBeac6 Jan 1944 PAK-64 (part). Transfer from Beatrice Malina Roberts to William Arthur Buckleigh. 19a 1r 28p.5 
Land-UBeac*6 Jan 1944 PAK- l/p 5112 (Lot 3 part). Transfer from Beatrice Malina Roberts to William Arthur Buckleigh. 4a 3r 3p.6 
Land-UBeac*7 Apr 1945 PAK-107.108. Transfer from Abraham Murdoch Gillies to William Arthur Buckleigh. 39a 3r 7p.7 
Land-UBeac*9 Feb 1950 PAK-110. Transfer from Minnie Lavinia Kenyon to William Arthur Buckleigh. 19a 2r 37p.8 
Land-UBeac23 Jun 1950 PAK-77. Transfer from William James Pridham to William Arthur Buckleigh. 40a 2r 31p.9 
Land-UBeac*23 Jun 1950 PAK-80. Transfer from William James Pridham to William Arthur Buckleigh. 19a 3r 22p.10 
Land-UBeac*2 Oct 1952 PAK-110. Transfer from William Arthur Buckleigh to Emily Olive Violet Gray. 19a 2r 37p.11 
Land-UBeac2 Oct 1952 PAK-107.108. Transfer from William Arthur Buckleigh to Emily Olive Violet Gray. 39a 3r 7p.12 
Land-UBeac2 Oct 1952 PAK-80. Transfer from William Arthur Buckleigh to Emily Olive Violet Gray. 19a 3r 22p.13 
Land-UBeac*28 Apr 1961 PAK-65 (part). Transfer from Jessie Maud Buckleigh to William Arthur Buckleigh. 20a 1r 33p.14 
Marriageb 1963 Spouse: Joan McDonald.
 
Residence*a 1972 Moved to Dalyston near Wonthaggi.15 
Land-UBeac*14 Feb 1974 PAK-65 (part). Transfer from William Arthur Buckleigh to Clive Dana Colles Norma Aileen Colles. 20a 1r 33p.16 
Death*31 Oct 1974 Wonthaggi, VIC, Australia, #D28003 (age 75) [par George BUCKLEIGH & Emmaline FARLEY].2 
Village Bell*May 1988The article reads: Council adopted a recommendation of Mr. John Milligan to name a road running off Telegraph Road, Buckleigh Lane, after Bill Buckleigh. The road reservation is adjacent to the property once owned by this colourful former resident.17 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
bt 1931 - 1949Greenvale, Middle Road, Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: carpenter. With Jessie Maud Buckleigh.18,19,20,21,22,23
1954Green Valley, Telegraph Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: carpenter. With Jessie Maud Buckleigh.24
bt 1963 - 1972Telegraph Road, Upper Beaconsfield, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: carpenter. With Joan McDonald Buckleigh.25

Newspaper-Articles

  • 9 May 1931, PAKENHAM EAST-Eric Harley and William Arthur Buckleigh of Beaconsfield Upper, were arrested on a charge of the larceny of potatoes the property of the Longmuir brothers Dalmore.26
  • 22 Jan 1944, TRANSPORT OF RACEHORSES; GEELONG CHARGES
    GEELONG, Fri: A number of cases under National Security Regulations for alleged transport by road of racehorses for a greater distance than 25 miles was heard by Mr M. Steedman, PM, in the city court today. Mr R. Daffy prosecuted, and Mr J. M. Cullity appeared for 24 of the 29 defendants.
    Claude A. Goodfellow, Ascotvale rd, Flemington, was charged with the carriage of a horse for a greater distance than 25 miles. Inspector W. G. Fendrick said at 8am on July 24 he stopped a car and float at the 26 mile post on the Geelong rd and questioned Goodfellow, who said he was taking 2 horses from Ascotvale to Geelong.
    Mr Cullity submitted that there was no evidence that the horses had been carried a greater distance than 25 miles. The fact that they were seen at the 26-mile post did not suggest that they had travelled the 26 miles.
    Mr Steedman upheld the submissions, and dismissed the case.
    A similar charge against William Buckleigh, Beaconsfield, was also dismissed.27
  • 5 Feb 1944, For the carriage of racehorses the following were fined £10, with £1 11/6 costs: William Buckleigh, Middle rd, Beaconsfield.28
  • 13 Mar 1946, OLD WORN-OUT HORSES FOR FERTILISER WORKS W. BUCKLEIGH, Beaconsfield (Phone Upper Beaconsfield 78).29
  • 25 Feb 1948, Quamby Rd. Bridge “A Deathtrap ”
    From Mr. W. Buckleigh, Beaconsfield: “I AM WRITING to ask if you could do anything about repairing Telegraph Rd. and Quamby Rd. which are in a very bad state—in fact, they'are really dangerous in two or three places. The bridge in Quamby Rd. is a death trap; also at Kay’s Corner on Telegraph Rd. a pipe is needed, across the road. — Bridge has been fixed, and pipes will be installed when available.30

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/P7, unit 458; VPRS 7591/P4, unit 518.
  2. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  3. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Watkins Family Tree : born in Canada.
  4. [S6] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Marriage Index Victoria 1921-1942.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 6116-038 - William Arthur Buckleigh of Upper Beaconsfield Farmer.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 4353-440 - William Arthur Buckleigh of Upper Beaconsfield Farmer.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1277-225 - William Arthur Buckleigh of Upper Beaconsfield Farmer.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1108-401 - William Arthur Buckleigh of Upper Beaconsfield Timber Merchant.
  9. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 3939-672 - William Buckleigh of Telegraph Road Beaconsfield Farmer.
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 6377-350 - William Arthur Buckleigh of Telegraph Road Beaconsfield Farmer.
  11. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1108-401 - Emily Olive Gray of 6 Acacia Street Hartwell Married Woman.
  12. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1277-225 - Emily Olive Gray of 6 Acacia Street Hartwell Married Woman.
  13. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 6377-350 - Emily Olive Gray of 6 Acacia Street Hartwell Married Woman.
  14. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 8057-139 - William Arthur Buckleigh of Telegraph Road Beaconsfield Farmer.
  15. [S61] Upper Beaconsfield History Archive.
  16. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 8057-139 - Clive Dana Colles M.M.B.W. Inspector and Norma Aileen Colles Married Woman both of St Georges Road Upper Beaconsfield - joint proprietors.
  17. [S15] Newspaper - Village Bell "062-1988, p3 Council Notes by Keith Ewenson."
  18. [S131] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1931 "1931-1954."
  19. [S134] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1934.
  20. [S136] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1936.
  21. [S137] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1937.
  22. [S142] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1942.
  23. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  24. [S154] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1954.
  25. [S101] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1903 - 1980 "Wm Arthur Buckleigh listed at Greenvale."
  26. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 9 May 1931, p15.
  27. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 22 Jan 1944, p5.
  28. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 5 Feb 1944, p3.
  29. [S218] Newspaper - The Dandenong Journal (1927-1954) "13 Mar 1946, p9."
  30. [S218] Newspaper - The Dandenong Journal (1927-1954) "The Dandenong Journal (Vic. : 1927 - 1954), Wed 25 Feb 1948, p14
    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article214580148."
Last Edited30 Jan 2019

George Brown

M, #2712, b. c 1834, d. 29 Dec 1896
George Brown 1890s
Photograph by J.W. Lindt's Photography Studio.
Birth*c 1834 Crookham, Cornhill, Northumberland, England.1 
Marriage*22 Mar 1864 Spouse: Margaret Stewart. Melbourne, VIC, Australia, Noted on marriage certificate that George has spelt his surname with an E on the end (both his name and his father Francis' surname). Certificate states that they are childless, however they had a child 4 months earlier.1
 
Land-Berwick29 Nov 1871George Brown selected land BER-23 from the Crown. 33a 2r 32p.2 
Land-Berwick29 Nov 1871He selected land BER-24 from the Crown. 32a 2r 0p.3 
Land-Berwick*24 Oct 1872 BER-25. Transfer from Matthew O'Connor to George Brown. 21a 2r 25p.4 
Land-UBeac*b 2 Jun 1879He selected land from the Crown. PAK-67. 39a 0r 34p. Land File 2068/19.20 - Selected by G. BROWN. Crown grant 2 Jun 1879.5,6 
Land-Berwick23 May 1883 BER-25 (part). Transfer from George Brown to Thomas Golden Vaile. 8a 0r 18p (southern part of land.)7 
Land-Berwick18 Jul 1883 BER-24. Transfer from George Brown to The Planet Permanent Building Society.8 
Land-Berwick*18 Jul 1883 BER-25 (part). Transfer from George Brown to The Planet Permanent Building Society. Balance (northern part of land.)9 
Land-Berwick18 Jul 1883 BER-23. Transfer from George Brown to The Planet Permanent Building Society.10 
Widower28 Jul 1884George Brown became a widower upon the death of his wife Margaret Stewart.11,1 
Marriage*13 Jan 1887 Spouse: Mary Jane Paterson. High Church, Geelong, VIC, Australia, #M2933.11,12
 
Marriage-Notice*15 Jan 1887BROWN—ESSON. —On the 13th inst., at High Church, Geelong, by the Rev. J. R. Wardrop, George Brown, of Berwick, to Mary, youngest daughter of the late John Ford Paterson, and relict of the late Thomas Esson.12 
Land-UBeac*22 May 1888 PAK-67. Transfer from George Brown to Susan Bain. 39a 0r 34p.13 
Land-UBeac*7 Sep 1888 PAK-169. Transfer from The Trustees Executors and Agency Company Ltd to George Brown. 19a 3r 16p.14 
Land-UBeac7 Sep 1888 PAK-176. Transfer from The Trustees Executors and Agency Company Ltd to George Brown. 19a 0r 17p.15 
Residence*1890 Inveresk, Berwick, VIC, Australia, Property built by Architects, Little & Beasley (who also designed Berwick Grammar School) for George Brown. Arthur Streeton visited the Brown Family at 'Inveresk' in 1891 & painted individual portraits of his young son Francis and stepson, Louis Esson.1 
Death*29 Dec 1896 Berwick, VIC, Australia, #D12464 (age 61) [par Frank BROWN & Elizabeth SCOTT]
He died of gout and softening of the brain.16,1 
Death-Notice*31 Dec 1896BROWN -On the 29th December, at his late residence, High-street, Berwick, George, the beloved husband of M. J. Brown, aged 62 years.
BROWN. -The Friends of the late GEORGE BROWN are respectfully informed that his remains will be interred in the Berwick Cemetery THIS DAY, (the 31st inst.) leaving his late residence, High-street, Berwick, at 4 p.m.17 
Probate (Will)*11 Mar 1897 63/479. Gent. Owned CA169 & CA176 Parish of Pakenham (38ac 3r 33p) at the time of his death value £48, and other land and personal assets. [J Shaw on parish map]18 
Land-UBeac8 Aug 1900 Memo No 24816. James Paterson of City Road South Melbourne Decorator is registered proprietor of the within described land as Executor to whom probate of the will of George Brown (who died 29th December 1896) was granted on 5th February 1897.19 
Land-UBeac*8 Aug 1900 Memo No 24816. James Paterson of City Road South Melbourne Decorator is registered proprietor of the within described land as Executor to whom probate of the will of George Brown (who died 29th December 1896) was granted on 5th February 1897.20 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
30 Mar 1851Elizabeth BROWN (Saddler's Widow), Cornhill Village, Northumberland, EnglandAge 15 - Ag Labourer21

Grave

  • 5-103+B, Berwick Cemetery, Berwick, VIC, Australia, buried next to their son (who is in unmarked grave)22

Family

Margaret Stewart b. c 1827, d. 28 Jul 1884
Child 1.George Brown+ b. 12 Nov 1863, d. 31 May 1887

Newspaper-Articles

  • 29 Sep 1880, BERWICK POLICE COURT. Friday, 24th September. (Before Messrs Officer, Elves, Palmer, and James Wilson.) George Brown and David Crichton v. William Brisbane and Edmund Waterson; claim for carriage of timber, £6 7s. 5d. Order for amount and £2 costs against Edward Waterson, William Brisbane, the other defendant, not having been summoned.23
  • 13 Sep 1882, THE BERWICK PARTY. The most successful local party of the season was held at Berwick on Friday last, when about a hundred ladies and gentlemen responded to the invitation of Mr and Mrs George Brown, to assemble at a private party. The evening was very wet, but as the ample accommodation of Border Hotel was brought into requisition, lots of room was found for everyone in a very comfortable way. The impression that my wife and I formed was a very happy one, and I am prepared to talk about it "till further orders," as the saving goes.
    Mr and Mrs Bain were in the most amiable humour and remained so all the evening. It may also be remarked that Mr Bain gallantly stayed up till four in the morning— without going off to sleep—a feat never before attained by that gentleman under any circumstances. He entertained the elderly gentlemen in a a side parlor with scientific subjects and scientific philosophy (including remarks on the origin of species) and galavanted about the ball room in a most frisky manner. His exuberance reached a climax when the band played the Highland Fling. Then he joined the vigorous exercise because he couldn't restrain himself, and with Mrs A. Dunbar for a vis-a-vis, fairly eclipsed every thing hitherto seen in line of "flings". He "flung" his figure about until the musicians panted for breath. There were others engaged in the dance, but they are not to be spoken of in the same breath. Mr Thomas Henderson, Mr D. Crichton, Miss J. Bain, and others, had a turn at it, while the rest of the company looked on with pleased delight. I could not observe that anyone in the company thought himself or herself, as the case might be, too good to mix with anyone else present, and I mention this as it struck me as an unpardonable breach of the usual "society" etiquette. Nevertheless it pleased me, and lots of other good judges too, to notice it. This genial, sociable, condition of things was commuented upon favorably by several gentlemen who made speeches during the night ; by Mr J. Gibb, M.L A., the Rev Mr Martin, and Mr Charles Hill, who were all in the most happy speechmaking humor.
    The large drawing room upstairs was devoted to card parties and music, vocal and instrumental, and was a pleasant resort through the evening It was too cold to go out on the balconies, so no one ventured there— also an uncommon element at "society" gatherings. This is a stern fact ! The supper and refreshment tables were laid out in such form that it was difficult not to forget oneselves, and to remember where to draw a fashionable line on the question of appetite: The refreshments, of endless variety, were splendidly served, and did Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Bain the greatest credit.
    An excellent string band (Professor Boom's) discoursed the dance music in first-class style and selected the latest and most approved waltzes and quadrilles. Dancing alternated with vocal music by several ladies and gentlemen, was kept up with enthusiasm until five o'clock in the morning, and no one seemed to get tired. If they did, they declined to acknowledge it.
    A note of thanks to Mr and Mrs Brown, for their grand entertainment, and to Mr George Brown, Junior, who was most successful in administering to everyone's enjoyment, and to Mr and Mrs Bain, for their successful efforts on the occasion, were all passed with acclamation. Mr. Gibb, the Rev. Mr Martin and Mr C. Hill, proposed the votes in pleasant speeches referring specially to the recovery of Mr Brown, from his late illness. Mr Gibb, of course alluded to the charms of the fair youth and beauty present, and drew visions of future happy unions from the party. Mr Martin made a capital speech, and Mr Hall a charactaristic one—on the sociable nature of the party—a speech decidedly to the point, which amused everybody. Mr G. Brown, junior made a suitable performance, and was delighted that their efforts had been successful in causing their guests to spend a pleasant evening; hoping also that the assemblage would favor them on future occasions with their presence. People grew hoarse then with singing "Jolly good fellows," and the like. I want to know when the next is to be ? I'm ready no to don the "war-paint" again for another such spree.
    By-the-bye, I hear that another leading resident is making out a list of invitations, and I look forward to something pretty good too. " Auld Lang Syne " was how they finished it, and when the time came I was sorry, for one, and so was my "better-half."24
  • 1 Nov 1882, The Clydesdale Stallion PRINCE Will Stand this Season at Mr. BROWN'S FARM, BERWICK. PRINCE is a bright bay, foaled November, 1877, and stands 17 hands high, with plenty of bone, hair, and muscle. He has a very kind temper, and is a splendid worker. He is by Rowan's Prince Arthur (imported), who stands nearly 18 hands high, and measures 13 inches below the knee. He was bred by J. N. Fleming, Esq., of Knockden, by Prince Alfred out of Darling, twice winner of the Highland Society's first prize; twice first for County of Ayr; and first for Glasgow. Darling is also the dam to Young Darling, purchased in Scotland for C. B. Fisher, Esq., Melbourne for the sum of 400 guineas. Prince Arthur being own brother to the above, and his blood being almost identical with the Prince of Wales, he being got by the father, Prince Arthur by the son, out of the celebrated mare Darling. At the great annual sale of Mr L. Drew, of Merriton, near Hamilton, a colt two years old, by Prince of Wales, brought at auction 1000 guineas; in Melbourne, a colt rising two years old and bred by C. B. Fisher, and out of Darling, full sister to Prince Arthur, and sold by W. C. Youille to Mr Hislop, of Hawkes Bay N.Z., for 1000 guineas. In both cases said to be the highest prices for such young stock either in Scotland or the Australian Colonies, thus proving the blood, breeding and pedigree of this illustrious noble strain of Clydesdale horses to be as yet unequalled. PRINCE, therefore, belong to a family whose lineage has been connected for a length of time with the first prizes of the Highland Societie's Shows held at Stirling. Prince's brothers received first prize at the Grand National, Geelong: 1st and 2nd at Kyneton; 1st at West Bourke; 1st at Heidelberg; 1st at Castlemaine, and 1st at Daylesford. Note:—Prince Arthur is now standing at Kyneton at £25 per mare. Prince's dam, Young Darling, is by Ben Lomond (imported), whose pedigree you all well know as being one of the best horses to breed from in the Colony.
    TERMS.—£3 10s, with three months grass;' or £2 10s, without grass; the mares being led to the horse. All mares to be removed when stinten, of which due notice will be given, after which, if not removed a charge of 2s per week will be made. Good English grass paddocks, well fenced, and plenty of water. Every care taken, but no responsibility. For further particulars apply to,
    GEORGE BROWN, Storekeeper, Berwick.25
  • 31 Jan 1883, BERWICK, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16th.
    MPORTANT CLEARING SALE Of Dairy Cattle, Draught Horses, Brood Mares, Saddle and Harness Horses, Farming Implements, &c.
    Joseph Clarke & Co. HAVE been favored with instructions from Mr. George Brown of Berwick, he having sold his business in Berwick and let his farms, to Sell by Public Auction, on the above date, at the farm, One Mile from Berwick, the whole of his valuable stock of Cattle, Horses, Brood Mares, Entire Horses, Farming Implements, &c. as under:
    Clydesdale Entire Horse, "Prince" five years old, dark bay, black points. Sire, Rowan's Prince Arthur (imp.) Dam by Ben Lomond (imp.)
    Clydesdale Entire, "Young King of the Valley" bay, two years, by King of the Valley (imp.) Dam by Old Nugget.
    10 Heavy Draught Brood Mares 1 with foal at foot by Prince, all stinted by Prince.
    4 Heavy Draught Geldings. The above are all young, broken, and first-class workers.
    1 Saddle Mare, five years, broken to saddle and harness, very fast trotter.
    1 Yearling Colt by "Tasman."
    7 Good Young Saddle and Harness Horses.
    5 Two and three-year-olds, unbroken, fit for saddle and harness.
    1 Good Wagonette Gelding, three years, used at store for general purposes.
    30 Head Cattle, fat and springers.
    1 Tip Dray nearly new.
    1 Spring Dray and Hay Frame.
    1 Express Waggon and Cover.
    2 Ploughs.
    1 Set Harrows.
    1 Roller.
    Cross cut Yankee Frame Saws, Tools, Scythes, Hay Forks, Rakes, Ladders, &c, odd lots of Harness, Sundries too numerous to mention.
    Stack of first class Feed Oaten Hay about 50 Tons.
    Horse Works and Chaffcutter by Buncle, No. 2, in use one season only.
    About 100 Fowls and Turkeys.
    1 First-class Double Seated Buggy, nearly new. 1 New Set Buggy Harness, 1st prize Dandenong Show.
    2 Good Sets Buggy Harness.
    1 Good Set Wagonette Harness.
    1 do. Spring Cart Harness.
    2 do. Dray Harness.
    4 do. Plough Harness.
    1 do. Leading Harness.
    2 Gent's Riding Saddles and Bridles.
    1 Lady's Riding Saddle.
    1 Pack Saddle.
    2 Sets Entire Harness.
    NOTE.-The Auctioneers wish to call particular attention to this Sale, the Horse Stock being the most superior lot offered under the hammer in this District for a long time past.26
  • 25 Jun 1884, BERWICK BRICKFIELD. Bricks seem now to be in the ascendant, and therefore brickfields are coming prominently to the front. The one mentioned in our local columns lately as being likely to be commenced on the property of Mr. George Brown, of Berwick, has received a larger exploration since.
    Clay of various colors, from the common brown up to a pure white, has been found in this ground at several depths of strata. The railway station called Officer's siding is within less than ten chains of it, so that a tramway can be made at a small expense, and the bricks, being put in the trucks at the kiln, would receive no further handling until they arrived at the place where they were wanted, whether it was Sale or Melbourne, or further. As the Government charge only 7s. 6d. per 1000 bricks for freight up to fifty miles, these bricks could be deposited in Melbourne at actually less than Hoffman's can be delivered there. The quality of the clay, it is said, is so far superior in density, adhesiveness, and color, that it would rapidly compel a demand to arise for the bricks. Some of it is much better than what they awake the various culinary utensils from at the far-famed Epsom potteries near Sandhuust.
    Mr. George Brown, in order that the matter should be thoroughly tested in the interests of Berwick, has already let it be known that to a company, which probably will start shortly, he will give up 10 acres of his ground for say twenty years, at a peppercorn rent, and besides, take a good interest in it himself as well as get some of his friends to do the same. The matter has already been received in such a manner that augurs well for its future existence and success.. In the course of next week such steps will have been taken as will lay it before the capitalists of Berwick, and then it will be seen if they me public spirited enough to assist in carrying out a local enterprise, which will not only make employment for a large number of workmen but will cause an increase and extended circulation of money amongst the shopkeepers and tradesmen of the township. It is to be hoped that local enterprise will be sufficiently large-hearted as to take the shares up rapidly amongst themselves, and that there will be no need to go to the metropolis for the small amount of money re quired to carry on the concern. Firewood is also in abundance, the supply being practically illimitable, millions of tons being on and around the spot. so that the firing will be a very small item in the outlay.27
  • 20 Sep 1884, GENERAL-STORE -From England, one who thoroughly understands the Ironmongery and has knowledge of the drapery, seeks EMPLOYMENT in a country store, Address A. B., care Geo. Brown, Berwick.28
  • 24 Sep 1884, GEORGE BROWN, Storekeeper, Berwick, BEGS to thank the inhahitants of Berwick and the Surrounding District for the Liberal Patronage bestowed upon him in the past, and wishes to inform them that he has made GREAT REDUCTIONS IN HIS PRICES, AND IS NOW Selling all Goods at Cost Price for CASH.29
  • 5 May 1886, NOTICE. I HEREBY give Notice that I have SOLD my BUSINESS as Storekeeper at Berwick to Mr. S. M. CAMERON, to whom all Debts owing to me are to be paid. GEORGE BROWN. April 13th, 1886.30
  • 25 Oct 1889, Paterson—Deans.—The marriage of Miss Lizzie Leslie Deans, daughter of the late Captain Deans, of Aberdeen, with Mr. Hugh Paterson, decorative artist of Collins street, Melbourne, took place last Wednesday evening, October 28, at " Huntly," Camberwell, the residence of Mr. Robert Donaldson, brother-in-law of the bride. The Rev. Mr. Murdock, Presbyterian minister of Camberwell, officiated. The bride wore a handsome gown of cream merveilleux completed with cream net dotted with pearls. An aigrette of jessamine and orange blossoms was worn in the hair. The bridesmaids were Miss Moffat of Romsey, and Miss Collie MacGregor of Hawthorn, Mr. James Paterson, brother of the bridegroom, acted as best man. The house was beautifully decorated with flowers of all kinds, arranged in several devices, and tied with ribbons. The guests included a number of relatives of the family, and numerous friends of the bride and bridegroom. Mrs. R. T. Donaldson, sister of the bride, wore an elegant costume of biscuit coloured silk richly embroidered and brightened with trimmings of moss green brocade. Miss Paterson was attired in a stylish vieux rose silk draped with chincilla lace, diamond ornaments were also worn. Miss Elizabeth Paterson, art citron silk, with black Spanish lace. Mrs. George Brown (Berwick), white Indian muslin richly embroidered in gold, and a deep amber silk sash ; gloves and fan to match. Mrs. B. T. Donaldson; fawn faille. Miss Brown, cream Indian silk. Mrs. R. Gartly, black silk and jet. Mrs. Geo Gartly, grey moire. Mrs. Humphrey, black silk and lace. Miss Moffatt, veiux rose liberty silk and moire. Miss McGregor, a pretty gown of liberty silk muslin.
    The list of wedding presents is as follows : —Mr. Tom Humphrey, half brother of the bride, a splendid piano, also two oil paintings by Mr, Humphrey. Mr. J. Ford Paterson, two oil paintings. The Misses Paterson (of Cramond House), beautiful bedroom walnut suite. Mr. Wiliam Stewart (of Sydney, cousin of the bridegroom), diamond bracelet. Mr. James Paterson (of the Terricks), silver entree dishes. Mr. and Mrs. O. S. Paterson, very handsome case of silver fruit knives and forks. Mr. James Paterson silver tea and coffee service. Mr. Geo. Walton, silver card tray. Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Donaldson, handsome time-piece. Mr. and Mrs. Gartly, silver mounted salad bowl. Mr. and Mrs. John Boss (Sale), silver fish carvers, Mr. and Mrs. W. Mather; china tea service Mr. and Mrs. Moffat (Romsey), case cutlery. Mr. and Mrs. James M'Donald, pair of bronze statuettes. Mr. Geo. Stewart, bronze red stand. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gourlay, case of scent bottles in oak and silver. Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Donaldson, handsome Japanese vases. Mrs. and Miss Juno, beautiful claret jug, mounted in silver. Master Louis Esson, silver table napkin ring and table crystal. Master Francis Brown (Berwick) silver butter cooler. Mr. and Mrs. Murray, silver table napkin rings. Miss Nellie M'Gregor, wall pocket. Mr. and Mrs. Mills-Thomson, bracket and ornaments. Miss Mills, hair ornaments. Miss Middle ton, silver butter knife. Mr. and Mrs. George Brown (Berwick), handsome case in oak mounted in silver liqueur.31
  • 5 Feb 1890, In my rambles around I see on all sides signs of slow but sure and steady progress. Geordie Brown is erecting, under the shadow of the churches, a very substantial brick villa. I hope the old saying, "the nearer the church the further from God" will lot prove true in his case. Butcher Richardson has demolished the old structure erected by the Lamonts at the corner that has sheltered the butcher of Berwick since the early fifties, and has erected in its place a commodious looking habitation. What is wanted now to make Berwick forge ahead is a quicker and cheaper means of communication with the metropolis.32
  • 2 Apr 1892, ABOUT BERWICK. (BY WANDERER.)
    I have been to Berwick for a few days this week. It is refreshing to get away occasion ally from the rush and drive that goes on in Melbourne and suburbs continuously, from Monday morning till Saturday night. In the city especially the high pressure is very great, and the wear and tear on the human machine is at times more than can be borne long. I have a few hours to spare, and ever having in my mind the couplet—
    'T was doing nothing was his curse—
    Is there a vice can plague us worse ?
    The wretch who digs the mine for bread,
    Or ploughs that others might be fed,
    Feels less fatigue than that decreed
    To him that cannot think or read.
    Sit down to knock off my usual column for the Chronicle. It is just 15 years since I was in Berwick last, and on that occasion I travelled from Back Creek, Talbot, to where I am now writing from, viz., High street, Berwick, 160 miles to attend the last moments of a dying friend. I left Talbot at 5 p.m., arrived in Melbourne at 11, got a mouthful of supper at Garton's and was again on the road for my destination half an hour afterwards, sitting behind a celebrated old horse named Fireworks. Fireworks had seen better days like a good many more of us, and I frequently since thought it was a cruel occupation (cab dragging) to put such a game, well-bred animal to. But the game old bird took me to Berwick that night in four hours, and taking into consideration the state of the roads and the weight of the cab, I think he did marvelously well. There was no iron horse up this road then, and those that have travelled through the "glue pot" a few miles up will remember how the coaches carrying Her Majesty's mails, and other vehicles used to have occasionally to be dug out, whilst the passengers did the Blondin business on the fences.
    "Full little knowest them that hast not tried,
    What a hell it is along such roads to ride."
    But after all, give me back the good old days. Fifteen years in Australia is comparatively speaking, a long term, as measured with other country towns ; yet Berwick and its people were then better off than now. This seems strange, but such is the case. I dropped into Searl's, the blacksmith and shoeing forge. When there is no barber's shop in the town, the next best place to look for news is the smithy. Mr Searl is an old and respected resident. He came here 30 years ago, has raised a large family, fears God, drinks no whiskey, and is loyal to his Queen. What better character can I give a man? Well, what does the honest fellow tell me? Simply that the place is going to the dogs since the railway was run through. I drop into some of the old storekeepers, such as Cameron and Lewis, to buy the Argus, and they confirm what I have already been informed, but in more striking words, that the place is dead. Then I masquerade round and invest a shilling in some good cigars with Mr Kelly, the largest storekeeper, and what does Mr Kelly say ? Well, Mr Kelly is about one of the most sensible Irishmen ever I come across, he says very little; almost "houlds his gab" do you mind me, and looks on me with suspicion—putting me down as a broken-down land jobber or pester ing bagman from Flinders lane. But after a while I assure him that I am neither, and he becomes more communicative, invites me to his house and we fraternise. I then question my newly made friend about the owners of land around, and putting this and that to gether, come to the conclusion that the curse of Berwick is the large holdings. I am not one that ever advocated the bursting up of large estates, or yet putting your foot on the throat of capital, but when large exhorbitant prices are demanded by the holders of these big estates from people that are prepared to settle on the land, I do think that the owners act as a brake on the progress of the place, and, to put it mildly, possess very little if any patriotism. I find the Wilsons, the Buchanans, the Gibbs, the Hamiltons, the Levines, the Clarks, the Struttles and Browns own pretty well all the country—barring the five churches and Mrs Bain's one clean, well-conducted pub. I call on a few people here who own land, and I am staggered when they ask me L100 an acre for land outside the township and L25 an acre for bush land, not cleared, two to three miles out. I ques tion them as to whether they are aware that the boom has collapsed ; they stare at me, are inclined to call me impudent, and laugh at my apparent expense. Tnus my readers will see that it is very improbable Berwick will ever advance much until the present generation of the big landowners have passed away.Berwick itself is one of the prettiest and healthiest townships in Victoria. It has all the advantages that nature can shower on it ; is within an hour and a half's run from Melbourne, and the population of the whole shire is only 1200 souls. If the big landholders ever intend to do anything for the people and the future yet unborn Berwickians, let them come down from their lofty pedestal, cut up the runs in 10, 20, and 50 acre blocks, give easy terms, with no pound of flesh interest, and Berwick will become one of the most prosperous and happy spots on the map of Australia. Round about Berwick there are some good vineyards, although small in extent. Mr Longmore shows me round his, and explains the different sorts of wine grapes. He tells me that this is an excellent year and that the crop will "run out" something like 450 gallons to the acre. I next visit Mr Lewis Smith's plantation. Mr Smith is the finest specimen of an Australian that I have ever met. He stands 6 feet 2 inches, weighs 16 stone, is 30 years of age and would make a grand life-guardsman. "Loui," as my guide, Mr Searl, calls him, is loughing when we arrive ; I am introduced as a vagabond press-man. "Loui" stops the plough, es corts me round and explains the character and capabilities of his vineyard. Amongst other things, he says, to make farming pay it is well to have a little of everything—as far as you can consiSstently go. "Loui" is a bachelor, and if I were a member of the weaker sex, or softer sex if you will, I should throw "sheep's eyes" at Loui. Amongst other curiosities in Berwick is to be found a haunted house. This house I am told was the parsonage attached to the Church of England. Two, if not three died in it and eventually the Rev. Hill was built new brick premises, and the old wooden place let. The tenants cleared out after a short time, both asserting that the house was haunted. I laughed at the story, but Miss S. an esteemed friend, challenged me to sleep in it, and I agreed provided a bed was found for me. I mean to win the wager—gloves, and at the same time arm myself with a little instrument known as a bulldog revol ver. The ghost that comes floating round the night I am in the haunted house will be pierced enough to act as a cigar holder, and my friend Dr. Helms will have the pleasure of pocketting a couple of guineas for the post mortem. Speaking about Dr. Helms reminds me of our 15 years ago ac quaintance. The Dr. was then "Cock of the Walk," had no opposition, and was Robinson Crusoe of the position. He is an old army surgeon, and has fought and bled for his country. At the side of my sick friend Mac. we have had many a long chat; I found him extremely attentive, a scholar, gentleman and a judge of wvhiskey. The Dr. holds several govern ment appointments such as vaccinator, health officer, and doctor of the Inebriate Asylum. I met him the other day on his black charger and saluted him, but he did not recognise me. I mean to make myself known to this countryman of mine who is a "Dublin Jackeen.33
  • 2 Feb 1897, George Brown, late of Berwick, gentleman, who died on the 29th December last, left a will dated August 16, 1894, bequeathing £100 to his sister, Elizabeth Best, and the income of the residue of his estate to his widow, Jane Brown, during life and widowhood, and after death or re-marriage to his son, Francis Paterson Brown. Value of real property, £8,000, personalty, £600.34
  • 22 Nov 1941, SATURDAY DECEMBER 13. At Half-past Three O'Clock Sharp. AUCTION SALE
    Under Instructions, from the Owner JAMES C. KNIGHT & Co. will OFFER for SALE by Public Auction on the Property HIGH STREET, BERWICK, Country Residence INVERESK, with a frontage of 198ft to the Prince's Highway by a depth of 330ft to Wilson st along Rutland rd., containing in all 1 ½ acres described as follows:—Allotments 1, 2, and 3, section 14, Berwick on which is erected beautiful brick dwelling containing spacious main and return hall, drawing-room, approximately 19 x 18; dining room 21 x 16; 3 main bedrooms, all beautifully appointed; maid's room, boxroom, large kitchen and cellar, scullery, pantry, bathroom, hot-water service to kitchen and bathroom, laundry, internal sewerage and septic tank, roomy verandahs skirt the south, east, and westerly outlook over gardens planted with the finest English trees and flowering shrubs.
    OUTBUILDINGS consist of brick garage, 3-stall stables, and man's room also woodshed and storeshed.
    BUYERS NOTE.—In the event of the pro perty not being sold as a whole, three allot ments, with frontages of approximately 49ft. in Rutland rd. by a depth of 198ft. and also one of 98 ft to the highway y a depth of 120ft., will be offered separately. We draw special attention to the splendid condition and quality of the buildings and facilities offered in this sale to patrons desiring a beautiful home or the possibility of acquiring a valuable allotment in one of Gippslands's most select localities within 9 miles of Dandenong and 27 miles of Melbourne, with electric light, water supply, excellent train and bus service to the city.
    TERMS. TITLE—The title is under the General Law, and may be inspected and particulars obtained at the office of Messrs. McCay & Thwaites, solicitors, 399 Collins Street, Melbourne.35

Citations

  1. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Brown-Paterson-Calder-Glover-Chibnall-Stewart Family Tree
    Owner: Laura Brown.
  2. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 469-785 - George Brown of Berwick.
  3. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 481-059 - George Brown of Berwick.
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 419-603 - see C/T 540-828 George Brown of Berwick, storekeeper (21a 2r 25p).
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1129-719 - George Brown of Berwick Storekeeper.
  6. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Land File 2068/19.20 - Selected by G. BROWN. Crown grant 2 Jun 1879.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 540-828 Thomas Golden Vaile - C/T 1463-474 of South Yarra Master Mariner.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 481-059 The Planet Permanent Building Society - see C/T 1479-668.
  9. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 540-828 The Planet Permanent Building Society - see C/T 1479-668.
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 469-785 The Planet Permanent Building Society - see C/T 1479-668.
  11. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  12. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 15 Jan 1887, p1.
  13. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1129-719 - George Brown to Susan Bain of Berwick Hotelkeeper.
  14. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1123-575 - George Brown of High Street Berwick Gentleman.
  15. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1166-169 - George Brown of High Street Berwick Gentleman.
  16. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901.
  17. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 31 Dec 1896, p1.
  18. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 63/479. Gent. Berwick.
  19. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1166-169 - Memo No 24816. James Paterson of City Road South Melbourne Decorator is registered proprietor of the within described land as Executor to whom probate of the will of George Brown (who died 29th December 1896) was granted on 5th February 1897.
  20. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1123-575 - Memo No 24816. James Paterson of City Road South Melbourne Decorator is registered proprietor of the within described land as Executor to whom probate of the will of George Brown (who died 29th December 1896) was granted on 5th February 1897.
  21. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Class: HO107; Piece: 2421; Folio: 802; Page: 10; GSU roll: 87100-87101."
  22. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    5-103 Brown Margaret F 26 [sic] 30/07/1884 153 - should be 57 years old
    5-103-B Brown George M 62 31/12/1896 304
    5-104-A Brown      0 05/08/1886 172
    5-104-A Brown George M 23 02/06/1887 182.
  23. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 29 Sep 1880, p3.
  24. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 13 Sep 1882, p3.
  25. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 1 Nov 1882, p2.
  26. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 31 Jan 1883, p2.
  27. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 25 Jun 1884, p3.
  28. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 20 Sep 1884, p1.
  29. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 24 Sep 1884, p1.
  30. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 5 May 1886, p2.
  31. [S14] Newspaper - Table Talk, 25 Oct 1889, p11.
  32. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 5 Feb 1890, p3.
  33. [S14] Newspaper - Williamstown Chronicle (Vic), 2 Apr 1892, p2.
  34. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 2 Feb 1897, p3.
  35. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 22 Nov 1941, p11.
Last Edited30 Nov 2017

Margaret Stewart

F, #2713, b. c 1827, d. 28 Jul 1884
Father*Robert Stewart
Mother*Catherine Campbell
Married NameBrown. 
Birth*c 1827 
Marriage*22 Mar 1864 Spouse: George Brown. Melbourne, VIC, Australia, Noted on marriage certificate that George has spelt his surname with an E on the end (both his name and his father Francis' surname). Certificate states that they are childless, however they had a child 4 months earlier.1
 
Death*28 Jul 1884 Berwick, VIC, Australia, #D7943 (age 57) [par Robert STEWART & Catherine CAMPBELL]
Died of Low fever and Apoplexy.2,1 
Death-Notice*29 Jul 1884THE Friends of Mr. GEORGE BROWN are respectfully invited to follow the remains of his late wife to the place of interment, the Berwick Cemetery.
The Funeral will leave his residence, High-street, Berwick, at 2 o'clock, WEDNESDAY, 30th inst.3 

Grave

  • 5-103+B, Berwick Cemetery, Berwick, VIC, Australia, buried next to their son (who is in unmarked grave)4

Family

George Brown b. c 1834, d. 29 Dec 1896
Child 1.George Brown+ b. 12 Nov 1863, d. 31 May 1887

Newspaper-Articles

  • 13 Sep 1882, THE BERWICK PARTY. The most successful local party of the season was held at Berwick on Friday last, when about a hundred ladies and gentlemen responded to the invitation of Mr and Mrs George Brown, to assemble at a private party. The evening was very wet, but as the ample accommodation of Border Hotel was brought into requisition, lots of room was found for everyone in a very comfortable way. The impression that my wife and I formed was a very happy one, and I am prepared to talk about it "till further orders," as the saving goes.
    Mr and Mrs Bain were in the most amiable humour and remained so all the evening. It may also be remarked that Mr Bain gallantly stayed up till four in the morning— without going off to sleep—a feat never before attained by that gentleman under any circumstances. He entertained the elderly gentlemen in a a side parlor with scientific subjects and scientific philosophy (including remarks on the origin of species) and galavanted about the ball room in a most frisky manner. His exuberance reached a climax when the band played the Highland Fling. Then he joined the vigorous exercise because he couldn't restrain himself, and with Mrs A. Dunbar for a vis-a-vis, fairly eclipsed every thing hitherto seen in line of "flings". He "flung" his figure about until the musicians panted for breath. There were others engaged in the dance, but they are not to be spoken of in the same breath. Mr Thomas Henderson, Mr D. Crichton, Miss J. Bain, and others, had a turn at it, while the rest of the company looked on with pleased delight. I could not observe that anyone in the company thought himself or herself, as the case might be, too good to mix with anyone else present, and I mention this as it struck me as an unpardonable breach of the usual "society" etiquette. Nevertheless it pleased me, and lots of other good judges too, to notice it. This genial, sociable, condition of things was commuented upon favorably by several gentlemen who made speeches during the night ; by Mr J. Gibb, M.L A., the Rev Mr Martin, and Mr Charles Hill, who were all in the most happy speechmaking humor.
    The large drawing room upstairs was devoted to card parties and music, vocal and instrumental, and was a pleasant resort through the evening It was too cold to go out on the balconies, so no one ventured there— also an uncommon element at "society" gatherings. This is a stern fact ! The supper and refreshment tables were laid out in such form that it was difficult not to forget oneselves, and to remember where to draw a fashionable line on the question of appetite: The refreshments, of endless variety, were splendidly served, and did Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Bain the greatest credit.
    An excellent string band (Professor Boom's) discoursed the dance music in first-class style and selected the latest and most approved waltzes and quadrilles. Dancing alternated with vocal music by several ladies and gentlemen, was kept up with enthusiasm until five o'clock in the morning, and no one seemed to get tired. If they did, they declined to acknowledge it.
    A note of thanks to Mr and Mrs Brown, for their grand entertainment, and to Mr George Brown, Junior, who was most successful in administering to everyone's enjoyment, and to Mr and Mrs Bain, for their successful efforts on the occasion, were all passed with acclamation. Mr. Gibb, the Rev. Mr Martin and Mr C. Hill, proposed the votes in pleasant speeches referring specially to the recovery of Mr Brown, from his late illness. Mr Gibb, of course alluded to the charms of the fair youth and beauty present, and drew visions of future happy unions from the party. Mr Martin made a capital speech, and Mr Hall a charactaristic one—on the sociable nature of the party—a speech decidedly to the point, which amused everybody. Mr G. Brown, junior made a suitable performance, and was delighted that their efforts had been successful in causing their guests to spend a pleasant evening; hoping also that the assemblage would favor them on future occasions with their presence. People grew hoarse then with singing "Jolly good fellows," and the like. I want to know when the next is to be ? I'm ready no to don the "war-paint" again for another such spree.
    By-the-bye, I hear that another leading resident is making out a list of invitations, and I look forward to something pretty good too. " Auld Lang Syne " was how they finished it, and when the time came I was sorry, for one, and so was my "better-half."5
  • 6 Aug 1884, On Sabbath last an appropriate reference was made to the late Mrs. George Brown, at the close of the sermon in the Presbyterian Church, Berwick. Mr. Martin said: "I know of few words which could bring a more abiding comfort in sorrow, or more effectually take the edge off the pain which the contemplation of sorrow brings with it than those I have met before you to-day. Old, well-worn, and familiar as they are, they become fresh and powerful when a fresh occasion calls for it. Such occasion has been given us by an event which has recently stirred the whole community with a rare unanimity of seasons. One has been taken from amongst us but a few days ago, whose form will long be missed by all the neighborhood, but by none more than by us Presbyterians, with whom, during all her colonial days, she has consistently and regularly associated, and of whose church she has been one of its most liberal supporters. Were I called upon to pronounces eulogium on her life, there are few for whom I would perform the task more readily than for her. But now that the curtain of her life has dropped, and the hush of death still lingers over our minds, it seems better to be silent. We have taken her up to the valley of shadow and let her there to wander not surely alone but in the guidance of One who leads all His people well. Maythe Good Shepherd lead her about of the valley into the fold where she may lie down and be at rest! And may those whofeel this affliction most, no less than those who can only stand by in sympathetic silence, betake ourselves to the same guidance. Let Us learn to look upon God as our Saviour has taught us to look upon Him, not as a far off spectator and unconcerned critic of our little lives, but as One who regards us with a shepherd's interest and a Shepherd's care. Let us be careful to listen to all those mentions which come to us from Him, whether through the Bible or our own consciences, and which are the means He takes to lead and guide us througlh life, and we may be sure that He will not desert us when we reach the end of our several ways.6
  • 28 Jul 1886, In Memoriam. BROWN -In affectionate memory of my dear mother, Margaret Brown, who died at Berwick, 28th July, 1884.7

Citations

  1. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Brown-Paterson-Calder-Glover-Chibnall-Stewart Family Tree
    Owner: Laura Brown.
  2. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 29 Jul 1884, p1.
  4. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    5-103 Brown Margaret F 26 [sic] 30/07/1884 153 - should be 57 years old
    5-103-B Brown George M 62 31/12/1896 304
    5-104-A Brown      0 05/08/1886 172
    5-104-A Brown George M 23 02/06/1887 182.
  5. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 13 Sep 1882, p3.
  6. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 6 Aug 1884, p2.
  7. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 28 Jul 1886, p1.
Last Edited28 Dec 2016

Robert Stewart

M, #2716
Marriage* Spouse: Catherine Campbell.
 

Family

Catherine Campbell
Children 1.Margaret Stewart+ b. c 1827, d. 28 Jul 1884
 2.Susan Stewart+ b. 28 Dec 1838, d. 26 Jun 1908
Last Edited28 Dec 2016

Catherine Campbell

F, #2717
Marriage* Spouse: Robert Stewart.
 
Married NameStewart. 

Family

Robert Stewart
Children 1.Margaret Stewart+ b. c 1827, d. 28 Jul 1884
 2.Susan Stewart+ b. 28 Dec 1838, d. 26 Jun 1908
Last Edited28 Dec 2016

Susan Stewart

F, #2718, b. 28 Dec 1838, d. 26 Jun 1908
Father*Robert Stewart
Mother*Catherine Campbell
Married NameBain. 
Birth*28 Dec 1838 Alloa, Ayrshire, Scotland.1,2 
Marriage*1859 Spouse: Robert Bain. VIC, Australia, #M785/1859.3,4
 
Widow21 Feb 1887Susan Stewart became a widow upon the death of her husband Robert Bain.3 
Land-UBeac*22 May 1888 PAK-67. Transfer from George Brown to Susan Bain. 39a 0r 34p.5 
Land-UBeac*20 Jun 1890 PAK-67. Transfer from Susan Bain to Kate Amelia Croker. 39a 0r 34p.6 
Death*26 Jun 1908 Heidelberg, VIC, Australia, #D6197 (age 68) [par unknown].7 
Death-Notice*27 Jun 1908BAIN. —On the 26th June, at Heidelberg, Susan, the dearly beloved wife of the late Robert Bain, and dearly beloved mother of Donald St, George A. (Canada), Mrs. W. S. Withers (England), after a long and painful illness, aged 69 years.
BAIN. - The Friends of the late Mrs. ROBERT BAIN are respectfully invited to follow her remains to the place of interment, the Berwick Cemetery.
The funeral will leave the residence of her son (D.S. Bain), Berwick, on Sunday, the 28th inst., at 3 p.m.8 
Probate (Will)*4 Nov 1908 Susan Bain. Widow. Berwick. 26 Jun 1908. 108/879.9 

Grave

  • Plot 5-001 A & B, Berwick Cemetery, Berwick, VIC, Australia10

Family

Robert Bain b. 1832, d. 21 Feb 1887
Child 1.Donald Stuart Bain b. 23 Jul 1880, d. 24 Jan 1937

Newspaper-Articles

  • 13 Sep 1882, THE BERWICK PARTY. The most successful local party of the season was held at Berwick on Friday last, when about a hundred ladies and gentlemen responded to the invitation of Mr and Mrs George Brown, to assemble at a private party. The evening was very wet, but as the ample accommodation of Border Hotel was brought into requisition, lots of room was found for everyone in a very comfortable way. The impression that my wife and I formed was a very happy one, and I am prepared to talk about it "till further orders," as the saving goes.
    Mr and Mrs Bain were in the most amiable humour and remained so all the evening. It may also be remarked that Mr Bain gallantly stayed up till four in the morning— without going off to sleep—a feat never before attained by that gentleman under any circumstances. He entertained the elderly gentlemen in a a side parlor with scientific subjects and scientific philosophy (including remarks on the origin of species) and galavanted about the ball room in a most frisky manner. His exuberance reached a climax when the band played the Highland Fling. Then he joined the vigorous exercise because he couldn't restrain himself, and with Mrs A. Dunbar for a vis-a-vis, fairly eclipsed every thing hitherto seen in line of "flings". He "flung" his figure about until the musicians panted for breath. There were others engaged in the dance, but they are not to be spoken of in the same breath. Mr Thomas Henderson, Mr D. Crichton, Miss J. Bain, and others, had a turn at it, while the rest of the company looked on with pleased delight. I could not observe that anyone in the company thought himself or herself, as the case might be, too good to mix with anyone else present, and I mention this as it struck me as an unpardonable breach of the usual "society" etiquette. Nevertheless it pleased me, and lots of other good judges too, to notice it. This genial, sociable, condition of things was commuented upon favorably by several gentlemen who made speeches during the night ; by Mr J. Gibb, M.L A., the Rev Mr Martin, and Mr Charles Hill, who were all in the most happy speechmaking humor.
    The large drawing room upstairs was devoted to card parties and music, vocal and instrumental, and was a pleasant resort through the evening It was too cold to go out on the balconies, so no one ventured there— also an uncommon element at "society" gatherings. This is a stern fact ! The supper and refreshment tables were laid out in such form that it was difficult not to forget oneselves, and to remember where to draw a fashionable line on the question of appetite: The refreshments, of endless variety, were splendidly served, and did Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Bain the greatest credit.
    An excellent string band (Professor Boom's) discoursed the dance music in first-class style and selected the latest and most approved waltzes and quadrilles. Dancing alternated with vocal music by several ladies and gentlemen, was kept up with enthusiasm until five o'clock in the morning, and no one seemed to get tired. If they did, they declined to acknowledge it.
    A note of thanks to Mr and Mrs Brown, for their grand entertainment, and to Mr George Brown, Junior, who was most successful in administering to everyone's enjoyment, and to Mr and Mrs Bain, for their successful efforts on the occasion, were all passed with acclamation. Mr. Gibb, the Rev. Mr Martin and Mr C. Hill, proposed the votes in pleasant speeches referring specially to the recovery of Mr Brown, from his late illness. Mr Gibb, of course alluded to the charms of the fair youth and beauty present, and drew visions of future happy unions from the party. Mr Martin made a capital speech, and Mr Hall a charactaristic one—on the sociable nature of the party—a speech decidedly to the point, which amused everybody. Mr G. Brown, junior made a suitable performance, and was delighted that their efforts had been successful in causing their guests to spend a pleasant evening; hoping also that the assemblage would favor them on future occasions with their presence. People grew hoarse then with singing "Jolly good fellows," and the like. I want to know when the next is to be ? I'm ready no to don the "war-paint" again for another such spree.
    By-the-bye, I hear that another leading resident is making out a list of invitations, and I look forward to something pretty good too. " Auld Lang Syne " was how they finished it, and when the time came I was sorry, for one, and so was my "better-half."11
  • 29 Jun 1908, BAIN —On the 26th June, at Heidelberg, Susan, the dearly beloved wife of the late Robert Bain, of Berwick, and dearly beloved mother of Donald S., George A., and Mr. W. S. Withers, after a long and painful illness, aged 69 years.12

Citations

  1. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    birth date from gravestone.
  2. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, McDermid Family Tree Owner: Eleanor Robertson
    birth date & place.
  3. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  4. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Chalmers et al Family Tree Owner: James Chalmers
    gives marriage date as 21 Dec 1858.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1129-719 - George Brown to Susan Bain of Berwick Hotelkeeper.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1129-719 - Susan Bain to Kate Amelia Croker of 314 Albert Street Married Woman Melbourne.
  7. [S3] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Edwardian Index Victoria 1902-1913.
  8. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 27 Jun 1908, p13.
  9. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/P0, unit 1407; VPRS 28/P2, unit 858; VPRS 7591/P2, unit 425.
  10. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    5-001     Bain     Edward Clarence     M     05/07/1875     50
    5-001-B     Bain     Robert     M     56     25/02/1887     180
    5-001-B     Bain     Susan S.     F          28/06/1908     438
    5-001-A     Legget     Catherine C.F     40     6/10/1900     344.
  11. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 13 Sep 1882, p3.
  12. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 29 Jun 1908, p1.
Last Edited28 Dec 2016

Robert Bain

M, #2719, b. 1832, d. 21 Feb 1887
Birth*1832 Falkirk, Scotland.1 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelMar 1855 To Port Phillip Bay, VIC, Australia. Ship George Marshall
Age 23. Travelling with Herbert BAIN, age 21.2 
Marriage*1859 Spouse: Susan Stewart. VIC, Australia, #M785/1859.1,3
 
Land-Berwick*31 Oct 1871Robert Bain selected land BER-26B from the Crown. 1a 2r 21p.4 
Land-UBeac*22 Mar 1875He selected land from the Crown. PAK-68. 49a 0r 0p - Land File 129/19.20.
On crown grant application on 7 May 1879 Bain stated: ".. that the land is so very poor that to touch it would unfit it for anything, so cut down the scrub, burned it off, and sown it down with English grass, but which is doing very bad." He also avoided the issue of residence on his selection by stating - "Relative to the 5th Clause. Being within 5 miles of my residence, and to have resided upon it, would have sacrificed the education of my children."5,6 
Land-Note*22 Mar 1875 PAK-68: Berwick, 22nd March 1875
Sir, I beg to forward you my application for 49 1/2 acres of land which I have repeged. Will you be kind enough to let me know the amount of the survey fees and I will at once forward it.
I am informed Mr Whitelaw is to survey Mr Lawes, as it is near to what I have selected he may be able to do mine at the same time, also Mr Crossman's so please let me know by return post the fees, and oblige
Yours very truly. Robert Bain
PS Mr Robertson will [also want] it as soon as you can send him instructions. R.B.7 
Land-Note5 Apr 1875 PAK-68: Berwick, 5/4/1875
Sir, Your notice relative to payment of survey fees I have duly received and have by this mail instructed Mr Mc Lean of 11 Swanston Street Melbourne to pay. On receiving the receipt I will at once forward it to show you it has been paid but you may depend upon them being paid tomorrow (Tuesday)
My principal reason for writing you is to draw your attention to a mistake in the form sent as it states that it is for survey fees 49 acres Parish of Gembrook when it is in the Parish of Pakenham. ... please rectify the mistake and oblige yours very truly Robert Bain.7 
Land-Note30 Oct 1875 PAK-68: Berwick, 30 October 1875
Sir, I beg to inform you that it is my intention to give up business as a Publican and reside upon the land.
Your attention will oblige yours respectfully Robert Bain.7 
Death*21 Feb 1887 Berwick, VIC, Australia, #D487 (age 55) [par James BAIN & Jane HUDSON].1 
Death-Notice*25 Feb 1887BAIN-On the 21th inst, at his residence, Berwick, Robert, the dearly beloved husband of Susan Bain, age 55 years.
THE funeral of the late ROBERT BAIN of Berwick, will move from his late residence, THIS DAY (Friday) at 2 p.m.8 
Probate (Will)*2 Jun 1887 34/327. Hotelkeeper. At the time of his death he owned the freehold property situated at Beaconsfield, containing 49 acres, being Lot 68, Parish of Pakenham, enclosed with post and rail fence. No other improvements, valued at £3 per acre.9 
Land-Berwick*2 Jun 1887 BER-26B. Transfer from Robert Bain to Duncan Robert McGregor Hector McKenzie Sutherland. Proprietors as executors.10 
Land-UBeac*20 Jun 1890 PAK-68. Transfer from Robert Bain to Kate Amelia Croker. 49a 0r 0p.11 

Grave

  • Plot 5-001 A & B, Berwick Cemetery, Berwick, VIC, Australia12

Family

Susan Stewart b. 28 Dec 1838, d. 26 Jun 1908
Child 1.Donald Stuart Bain b. 23 Jul 1880, d. 24 Jan 1937

Newspaper-Articles

  • 10 Sep 1861, FOR SALE, the BERWICK HOTEL with a Farm containing 160 acres of good land, in one lot or three, fronting the main Gipps Land road, 26 miles from Melbourne. For particulars apply to Mr R. Walker, storekeeper, corner Flinders-lane and Swanston street, Melbourne; or Mr R Bain, Border Hotel, township Berwick.13
  • 13 Sep 1882, THE BERWICK PARTY. The most successful local party of the season was held at Berwick on Friday last, when about a hundred ladies and gentlemen responded to the invitation of Mr and Mrs George Brown, to assemble at a private party. The evening was very wet, but as the ample accommodation of Border Hotel was brought into requisition, lots of room was found for everyone in a very comfortable way. The impression that my wife and I formed was a very happy one, and I am prepared to talk about it "till further orders," as the saving goes.
    Mr and Mrs Bain were in the most amiable humour and remained so all the evening. It may also be remarked that Mr Bain gallantly stayed up till four in the morning— without going off to sleep—a feat never before attained by that gentleman under any circumstances. He entertained the elderly gentlemen in a a side parlor with scientific subjects and scientific philosophy (including remarks on the origin of species) and galavanted about the ball room in a most frisky manner. His exuberance reached a climax when the band played the Highland Fling. Then he joined the vigorous exercise because he couldn't restrain himself, and with Mrs A. Dunbar for a vis-a-vis, fairly eclipsed every thing hitherto seen in line of "flings". He "flung" his figure about until the musicians panted for breath. There were others engaged in the dance, but they are not to be spoken of in the same breath. Mr Thomas Henderson, Mr D. Crichton, Miss J. Bain, and others, had a turn at it, while the rest of the company looked on with pleased delight. I could not observe that anyone in the company thought himself or herself, as the case might be, too good to mix with anyone else present, and I mention this as it struck me as an unpardonable breach of the usual "society" etiquette. Nevertheless it pleased me, and lots of other good judges too, to notice it. This genial, sociable, condition of things was commuented upon favorably by several gentlemen who made speeches during the night ; by Mr J. Gibb, M.L A., the Rev Mr Martin, and Mr Charles Hill, who were all in the most happy speechmaking humor.
    The large drawing room upstairs was devoted to card parties and music, vocal and instrumental, and was a pleasant resort through the evening It was too cold to go out on the balconies, so no one ventured there— also an uncommon element at "society" gatherings. This is a stern fact ! The supper and refreshment tables were laid out in such form that it was difficult not to forget oneselves, and to remember where to draw a fashionable line on the question of appetite: The refreshments, of endless variety, were splendidly served, and did Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Bain the greatest credit.
    An excellent string band (Professor Boom's) discoursed the dance music in first-class style and selected the latest and most approved waltzes and quadrilles. Dancing alternated with vocal music by several ladies and gentlemen, was kept up with enthusiasm until five o'clock in the morning, and no one seemed to get tired. If they did, they declined to acknowledge it.
    A note of thanks to Mr and Mrs Brown, for their grand entertainment, and to Mr George Brown, Junior, who was most successful in administering to everyone's enjoyment, and to Mr and Mrs Bain, for their successful efforts on the occasion, were all passed with acclamation. Mr. Gibb, the Rev. Mr Martin and Mr C. Hill, proposed the votes in pleasant speeches referring specially to the recovery of Mr Brown, from his late illness. Mr Gibb, of course alluded to the charms of the fair youth and beauty present, and drew visions of future happy unions from the party. Mr Martin made a capital speech, and Mr Hall a charactaristic one—on the sociable nature of the party—a speech decidedly to the point, which amused everybody. Mr G. Brown, junior made a suitable performance, and was delighted that their efforts had been successful in causing their guests to spend a pleasant evening; hoping also that the assemblage would favor them on future occasions with their presence. People grew hoarse then with singing "Jolly good fellows," and the like. I want to know when the next is to be ? I'm ready no to don the "war-paint" again for another such spree.
    By-the-bye, I hear that another leading resident is making out a list of invitations, and I look forward to something pretty good too. " Auld Lang Syne " was how they finished it, and when the time came I was sorry, for one, and so was my "better-half."14
  • 10 Dec 1884, BERWICK LICENSING COURT. DECMBER 5, 1884. .... Applications for the renewal of publican's licenses were granted to the following persons:-Robert Bain, Border hotel; Mary A. Kay, Gippsland hotel; Anne Milne, Bush inn; Catherine Bourke, Bourke's hotel; Arthur H. Somner, Beaconsfield hotel; Hubert Lenne, Pine Grove hotel. A billiard table license was granted to Mary A. Kay.15
  • 2 Mar 1887, DEATH OF MR. R. BAIN OF BERWICK. Everybody who knew the late Mr. R. Bain, of Berwick, whose death we chronicle elsewhere, will read the announcement with regret. He was a genial, open-hearted; good-natured man, of whom we have never heard any person say an ill word. He was naturally of a kind and generous disposition, and generally esteemed and respected. The funeral, which took place on Friday last, was, as might be expected, very largely attended by persons from far and near, although the weather was such as but few have ever seen before. Shortly after the funeral cortege started rain began to fall in a perfect torrent, and continued until some time after the burial ceremony was completed. During the ceremony at the grave the rainfall was something fearful, yet all present stood it with the greatest calmness. The Rev. J. Martin performed the funeral rites amid a very heavy fall of rain—such as we have not seen for many years—if ever. Deceased was born in Falkirk, Scotland, in 1831, and therefore at his death was about 55. He began his career in life as an apprentice to the drapery business, but he acquired a natural love fur the cultivation of flowers and took to the business of florist and gardener; and so well did he succeed that, as a boy of fifteen, he won many prizes at the Edin burgh shows. He arrived in Melbourne in 1857 and commenced storekeeping in Berwick in 1858. He was appointed postmaster, and retained the office for sixteen years. When he first took the position there was but one mail a week, but when he gave it up there were two mail a day. He also opened the Border hotel. In every movement originated for the advancement of the district he either was in the front or lending a helping hand. He was connected with the school board from the beginning up to his death. Until his health failed a few years ago he was very energetic in keeping "The Border" a model hotel, with the aid of his better half, always studying the comfort of visitors, and making them feel as much at home as possible. He will be missed by many for years to come.16
  • 5 Nov 1887, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22. Twelve O'clock Noon. BERWICK. Mountain Residence Site, Dominating the whole District, Including a Magnificent Fern Gully.
    49 ACRES Of LAND
    Accessible to Three Railway Stations by an Easily Graded Road. Executors' Sale.
    John BUCHAN and Co are instructed by D. R. M'Gregor and H. M. Sutherland, Esqs., executors under the will of the late Mr Robert Bain, to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION, at their rooms, 37 Queen street, on Tuesday, 22nd November, at twelve o clock noon,
    That exceedingly desirable MOUNTAIN HOME SITE, containing about 49 ACRES of LAND, having a frontage to the main Government road of 11 chains and being Crown Allotment 68, parish of Pakenham, county of Mornington.
    This superb block of land is unequalled for picturesqueness of situation, and for the grandeur and loveliness of its surroundings overlooking, as it does, a panorama of immense extent and singular beauty, comprising mountain, valley, forest, and marine scenery the Dandenong and Gembrook Ranges, and the gentler eminences of Berwick and Beaconsfield, the townships of Cranbourne and Frankston, including the waters of Westernport and Port Phillip Bays, and a fine expanse of undulating and thickly-timbered country in the hollows.
    Upon the estate is a CHARMING FERNTREE GULLY at the head of which stands the Hermitage, a spot marked out by nature for the site of a mansion or villa residence, or of a sylvan retreat in which the fortunate owner would find a perpetual feast for the eye. An atmosphere of fragrance, a sentiment of complete repose, and sources of health, invigoration, and refreshment only to be met with in the pure and bracing mountain air, while at the same time exempt from any feeling of solitude, the estate being equi-distant from Narree Warren, Berwick, and Beaconsfield railway stations and only four miles from Berwick, by an eaily-graded road, while it adjoins the residence of Mr Pegler, and is near the mountain retreats of Professor Halford and Messrs. A'Beckett, Morris, and Elms, and Mrs. Lawes, so that while it is secluded from the busy world it is not out of the reach of agreeable and intellectual society, and within two hours of Melbourne.
    Mr Bain, of the Border Hotel, Berwick, will be glad to direct intending purchasers to the ground.
    Terms-Quarter cash, balance 3, 6, and 12 months, at 5 per cent.
    Title Crown grant, at Messrs. Brahe and Gair, solicitors to the estate, No 3 St. James Buildings, William-street.17
  • 5 Jun 1888, THIS DAY. At Twelve O'Clock Noon. BEACONSFIELD. MOUNTAIN RESIDENCE SITE, Dominating the Whole District, and Including a MAGNIFICENT FERN GULLY (Known as BAIN'S FERNTREE GULLY), Accessible to Three Railway Stations by Easy Graded Roads.
    EXECUTOR'S SALE. JOHN BUCHAN and Co. are instructed by D. R. M'Gregor and H M Sutherland, Esqs., executors under the will of the late Mr Robert Bain, to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION, at their rooms, 37 Queen street, on TUESDAY, JUNE 5, At Twelve O'clock Noon, That exceedingly desirable property, containing by admeasurement 82 ACRES and 34 PERCHES, being Crown Sections 67 and 68, parish of Pakenham, and situated in the fashionable suburb of Beaconsfield, and in close proximity to the well known residences of Professor Halford, Professor Morris, Mrs Lawes, Mr. Goff, E. F. A'Beckett, and the well known Beaconsfield sanatorium.
    It is equidistant three miles from the Beaconsfield and Berwick railway stations. A special train runs to and from Melbourne daily, and runs in one hour. A forest sanctuary and mountain home, combining seclusion with the command of an expanse of land scape scenery rivalling some of the most famous prospects in the Spanish Pyrenees and the Italian Appenines, with the additional charm of a brook of spring water sparkling through a ferntree bower of exquisite beauty, diffusing freshness and coolness in an atmosphere of fragrance and healthfullness.
    Full directions to intending purchasers can be obtained at Bain's Border Hotel, Berwick.
    Terms—Quarter cash, balance 3, 6, and 12 months, at 5 per cent.
    Title, Crown certificates, at Messrs Brahe and Gair, solicitors to the estate, No 3 St. James's Buildings. William street.18
  • 21 Jul 1931, LAND LEASED FOR 500 YEARS.
    DANDENONG. Monday. - At the monthly meeting of the Berwick Shire Council a letter was received from the shire solicitors, Messrs Home and Wilkinson, stating that part of a Crown allotment was in the name of Robert Bain of Berwick and was leased on August 8, 1878, to James Gibb, Henry Searle, David Stewart Lindsay, and Thomas Cornelius Camm from January 1, 1878, for a term of 500 years thence ensuing, at a yearly rental of 1/, payable on December 1 each year if demanded.19

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, McDermid Family Tree Owner: Eleanor Robertson.
  3. [S80] Ancestry - Family Tree, Chalmers et al Family Tree Owner: James Chalmers
    gives marriage date as 21 Dec 1858.
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 469-780 Robert Bain of Berwick.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1125-814 - Robert Bain of Berwick Grazier. Dated 2 Dec 1878.
    [Note: this is curious as there is still correspondence in May 1879 re fulfilling the conditions of the lease]
  6. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 626/1556 Land File 129/19.20.
  7. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 129/19.
  8. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 25 Feb 1887, p1.
  9. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 469-780 Duncan Robert McGregor of Queens Street, Melbourne, Wine and Spirit Merchant and Hector McKenzie Sutherland, of Dandenong Banker, registered as proprietors as Executors of the will of Robert Bain.
  11. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1125-814 - Executors of Robert Bain's Will (Duncan Robert Mc Gregor of Queen Street Melbourne, Wine and Spirit Merchant and Hector McKenzie Sutherland, of Dandenong, Banker) to Kate Amelia Croker, of 314 Albert Street, East Melbourne, Married Woman.
  12. [S44] Index of burials in the cemetery of Berwick,
    5-001     Bain     Edward Clarence     M     05/07/1875     50
    5-001-B     Bain     Robert     M     56     25/02/1887     180
    5-001-B     Bain     Susan S.     F          28/06/1908     438
    5-001-A     Legget     Catherine C.F     40     6/10/1900     344.
  13. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 10 Sep 1861, p8.
  14. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 13 Sep 1882, p3.
  15. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 10 Dec 1884, p3.
  16. [S12] Newspaper - South Bourke and Mornington Journal 2 Mar 1887, p3.
  17. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 5 Nov 1887, p16.
  18. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Tue 5 Jun 1888, p2.
  19. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 21 Jul 1931, p11.
Last Edited30 Nov 2017

Donald Stuart Bain

M, #2728, b. 23 Jul 1880, d. 24 Jan 1937
Father*Robert Bain b. 1832, d. 21 Feb 1887
Mother*Susan Stewart b. 28 Dec 1838, d. 26 Jun 1908
Birth*23 Jul 1880 Berwick, VIC, Australia, #B13553.1 
Land-UBeac*26 Aug 1908 PAK-109. Transfer from John Baptiste Prevost to Donald Stuart Bain. 19a 3r 3p.2 
Land-UBeac*26 Aug 1908 PAK-134. Transfer from George Fabien Antoine Prevost to Donald Stuart Bain. 19a 0r 19p.3 
Land-UBeac*7 Sep 1908 PAK-109A. Transfer from Henriette Prevost to Donald Stuart Bain. 19a 3r 17p.4 
Land-UBeac*12 Jun 1909 PAK-109. Transfer from Donald Stuart Bain to Amy Edith Mann Marion Alice Mann. 19a 3r 3p.5 
Land-UBeac*14 Jul 1909 PAK-134. Transfer from Donald Stuart Bain to Walter William Harris. 19a 0r 19p.6 
Land-UBeac14 Jul 1909 PAK-109A. Transfer from Donald Stuart Bain to Walter William Harris. 19a 3r 17p.7 
Marriage*1910 Spouse: Lillian Emma Nathan. VIC, Australia, #M498.8
 
Land-UBeac*5 Jan 1914 PAK-158.159.161.162.165.166. Transfer from Frederick Barclay to Donald Stuart Bain. 78a 2p + 39a 2r 36p.9 
Land-UBeac*11 Sep 1914 PAK-158.159.161.162.165.166. Transfer from Donald Stuart Bain to Simeon Nathan. 78a 2p + 39a 2r 36p.10 
Death*24 Jan 1937 Merlynston, VIC, Australia, #D734 (Age 56.)8 
Death-Notice*25 Jan 1937BAIN -On the 24th January at 21 Orvieto street, Merlynston, Captain Donald Stuart Bain, aged 56 years.
BAIN-On the 24th January, at his private residence, Merlynston, Donald Stuart, beloved father of Merlyn (Mrs Osboldstone), son of the late Robert and Susan Bain, of Berwick. (Born July 23, 1880.)11 

Newspaper-Articles

  • 5 Nov 1901, Staff-Surgeon Donald Stuart Bain, a native of Berwick, has been promoted to a lieutenancy, and has received a commission in Kitchener's Fighting Scouts. Lieutenant Bain received his early training in the Berwick Cadet Corps.12
  • 9 Aug 1910, WOMEN'S FRAILTIES. HUSBANDS SEEK DIVORCE. Mr. Justice A'Beckett, in the Divorce Court yesterday, heard, in a long list, two rather remarkable cases in which women, by their frailty, ruined happy homes. WIFE AND CHAUFFEUR.
    In the first case Samuel Peter Mackay, aged 45, of Melville-park, Berwick, grazier, sought a dissolution of his marriage with Florence Gertrude Mackay, aged 43, on the ground of infidelity. Donald Stewart Bain, of Berwick, estate agent, and Harry Mulvey, a chauffeur, who was served at Neutral Bay, Sydney, were joined as co-respondents.
    Mrs. Mackay entered an appearance, but did not defend. Bain entered an appearance, and filed an answer denying the charges, but did not appear to defend. Mulvey did not enter an appearance. Mr. Duffy, K C. and Mr Woolf, instructed by Messrs. Blake and Riggall, appeared for the petitioning husband.
    Samuel Peter Mackay said -I am a grazier living at Melville-park, Berwick. I have property in Western Australia, and last year I had to go to that State. Up to this time I and my wife had lived happily, except that she occasionally gave way to intemperance. When I returned from Western Australia I found that my wife was not at home. A bundle of letters was handed to me, including one addressed to my wife. I opened it, and found that it was from Mulvey who had been my chaffeur. It showed that they had been guilty of improprieties. I learned that my wife was at a home in Murrumbeena, and I went to see her. She was propped up on pillows, and was apparently just recovering from a severe attack of alcoholism. I looked at her, and she said, "What are you looking at so hard?" I said, 'What can you expect? You have broken up our home. I told you what these drinking bouts would lead to." She said, I went to St Kilda with Mulvey, and we stayed the night". I said, "Where did you leave the car?" and she replied "I don't know." I said, "He would not have gone with you if you had not been fooling with him before." She denied it and I then said I have a letter here that gives the whole thing away." Then she told me that he had come into the room on one occasion to see her about the rubber rings of a cream separator and had "taken advantage of her." I asked her, on account of what I had heard, about Bain, and she said that he also had taken advantage of her. I have a daughter of 17 at school in Switzerland. A boy is at school in Melbourne.
    Other evidence was given to show the character of the house in St Kilda to which Mrs Mackay and Mulvey went.
    A decree nisi, with costs against both co-respondents, was granted.13
  • 2 Jul 1914, Mr Don Bain has sold on account of Mr Brown, his many properties to Mr Wilson, of Brighton. They include "Shepton" private hospital, Mr Poynter's pharmacy, Mr Marshall's store, and Messrs Anderson and Thomas's residences.14

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1100-949 - Donald Stuart Bain of High Street Berwick Estate Agent.
  3. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1098-543 - Donald Stuart Bain of High Street Berwick Estate Agent.
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1125-897 - Donald Stuart Bain of High Street Berwick Estate Agent.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1100-949 - Amy Edith Mann and Marion Alice Mann both of 37 Hawthorn Grove Hawthorn Spinsters.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1098-543 - Walter William Harris of Sale Police Magistrate.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1125-897 - Walter William Harris of Sale Police Magistrate.
  8. [S22] Victorian Government. BDM Index Victoria (online).
  9. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1744-800 + C/T 1582-326 - Donald Stuart Bain of 225 Collins Street Melbourne Agent.
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1744-800 + C/T 1582-326 - Simeon Nathan of Bourke Street Melbourne Furniture Warehouseman.
  11. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 25 Jan 1937, p1.
  12. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 5 Nov 1901, p5.
  13. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 9 Aug 1910, p5.
  14. [S196] Newspaper - Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) "2 Jul 1914, p2."
Last Edited8 Aug 2018
 

NOTE

Many family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.