James 'Jim' Clancy

M, #3171, b. 1923, d. 23 Mar 1958
Father*Joseph Peter Clancy b. 1891, d. 8 Dec 1952
Mother*Catherine Frances Smithenbecker b. 1890, d. 8 May 1975
Place in Upper Beac* Bimbimbie Drive. In Dewhurst. Named after the property 'Bimbimbie'. When Stuart Andrews aquired the property in 1940, he gave it the name 'Bimbimbie'. The property was built by Dr L L Smith as Louisville, but many of the subsequent owners changed its name. Other names were Dovercourt, Keynedon Court, Tooram Hills, and finally Bimbimbie. The house was destroyed by fire in February 1959. Bimbimbie Drive would have received its name when the Clancys subdivided their property. 
Probate (Will)* 595/697. Farmer. Upper Beaconsfield.1 
Birth*1923 Pleasant Hill, NSW, Australia.2 
Marriage*1949 Spouse: Helen Therese Clear. Albury, NSW, Australia, NSW #M18852/1949.3
 
Land-UBeac*21 Aug 1951 GEM-C-70.70A.B.C.D.E.71.71A. Transfer from Charles Edward Nash to James 'Jim' Clancy Patrick Joseph Clancy. 484a 1r 15p.4 
Death*23 Mar 1958 Dewhurst, VIC, Australia, #D3352 (Age 35.)5,6 
Death-Notice*25 Mar 1958CLANCY.—On March 23 (suddenly) at his residence, Bimbimbie, Upper Beaconsfield, James Clancy, dearly loved husband of Helen, and loving father of Peter, John, Joseph, Leon and Annette, aged 35 years. Requiescat in pace.
CLANCY.—On March 23, James, dearly loved son of Catherine and the late Joseph Clancy, and loving brother of John, Patrick and Geoffrey.
CLANCY.—Mass for the repose of the soul of the late Mr JAMES CLANCY will be celebrated at St Vincent de Paul's Church, Woodlands Street, North Essendon, THIS DAY, 9 am. The Funeral will leave the church at 3.30 pm for the Keilor Cemetery.7 
Land-Note*16 Jul 1963 As to the interest of James Clancy who died on 23rd March 1958. Letters of Administartion of his estate have been granted to Helen Therese Clancy of 39 Blyberg Street Jacana Widow.8 
Land-UBeac*16 Jul 1963 GEM-C-70.70A.B.C.D.E.71.71A. Transfer from James 'Jim' Clancy to Helen Therese Clancy. As administratix of James Clancy's estate.8 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
194954 Glass Street, Essendon, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: nil (name crossed out). With Joseph Peter Clancy and Patrick Joseph Clancy.9

Grave

  • Keilor Cemetery, Keilor, VIC, Australia10

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/P4, unit 2856; VPRS 7591/P3, unit 477.
  2. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hanhorg/…
  3. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hanhorg/…
    Helen Therese CLEAR was the daughter of Stanley Edmond John CLEAR (1899-1957) and Ursula Olive SCANLON (1893-1956).
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 6189-731 - James Clancy of Patterson Road Clyde and Patrick Joseph Clancy of 54 Glass Street Essendon Farmers - tenants in common in equal shares - C/T 7608-052.
  5. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  6. [S24] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), no inquest held.
  7. [S16] Newspaper - The Age 25 Mar 1958, p14.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 7608-052 - As to the interest of James Clancy who died on 23rd March 1958. Letters of Administartion of his estate have been granted to Helen Therese Clancy of 39 Blyberg Street Jacana Widow.
  9. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  10. [S38] Index of burials in the cemetery of Keilor,.
Last Edited8 Feb 2019

Patrick Joseph Clancy

M, #3172, b. 11 Aug 1926, d. 14 Feb 1998
Father*Joseph Peter Clancy b. 1891, d. 8 Dec 1952
Mother*Catherine Frances Smithenbecker b. 1890, d. 8 May 1975
Place in Upper Beac* Bimbimbie Drive. In Dewhurst. Named after the property 'Bimbimbie'. When Stuart Andrews aquired the property in 1940, he gave it the name 'Bimbimbie'. The property was built by Dr L L Smith as Louisville, but many of the subsequent owners changed its name. Other names were Dovercourt, Keynedon Court, Tooram Hills, and finally Bimbimbie. The house was destroyed by fire in February 1959. Bimbimbie Drive would have received its name when the Clancys subdivided their property. 
Probate (Will)* PATRICK JOSEPH CLANCY. Farmer. Essendon. 14 Feb 1998. 1143802.1 
Birth*11 Aug 1926 NSW, Australia. 
(Transfer to) Land-UBeac21 Aug 1951 GEM-C-70.70A.B.C.D.E.71.71A. Transfer from Charles Edward Nash to James 'Jim' Clancy Patrick Joseph Clancy. 484a 1r 15p.2 
Land-UBeac*30 May 1973 GEM-C-71A. Transfer from Patrick Joseph Clancy Helen Therese Clancy to Melbourne and Metropolitan Board of Works. 6a 3r 33p.3 
Land-UBeac9 Jan 1975 GEM-C-70.70A.B.C (part). Transfer from Patrick Joseph Clancy Helen Therese Clancy to Country Roads Board. Northern edge of all blocks.4 
Land-UBeac*9 Jan 1975 GEM-C-71 (part). Transfer from Patrick Joseph Clancy Helen Therese Clancy to Country Roads Board. NW corner.5 
Land-Note*21 Aug 1979 GEM-C-70.71 (part) l/p 121820: subdivision into lots 1 to 7 (Bimbimbie Drive.)6 
Land-UBeac*15 Aug 1980 GEM-C-70B (part), 172 Beaconsfield-Emerald Road. Transfer from Patrick Joseph Clancy Helen Therese Clancy to Gavin M Collins Nominees Pty Ltd. 7.514ha.7 
Village Bell*Dec 1982The article reads: On 11 February, 1959 the press recorded the destruction by fire of "Bimbimbi", described as "a mansion", and the home of Mr. Pat Clancy. The building stood to the east of the present road to Emerald, near the junction with Lewis Road, in a 404 acre estate. Bimbimbi Road was recently constructed in that area. The house was one of Victoria's first "pre-fabs", brought out from England in a sailing ship by Dr. Louis L. Smith, and called by him "Louisville". The blaze began in a kerosine refrigerator, and the flames had a firm hold on the old building before the brigade arrived. Dr. L. L. Smith, besides being a medical man, was a local landowner and a State politician, and deserves a small biography of his own possibly in the near future.8 
Death*14 Feb 1998 VIC, Australia. 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
194954 Glass Street, Essendon, VIC, AustraliaOccupation: grocer. With Joseph Peter Clancy and James 'Jim' Clancy.9

Grave

  • Keilor Cemetery, Keilor, VIC, Australia10

Citations

  1. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 28/P28, unit 144.
  2. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 6189-731 - James Clancy of Patterson Road Clyde and Patrick Joseph Clancy of 54 Glass Street Essendon Farmers - tenants in common in equal shares - C/T 7608-052.
  3. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 7608-052 - C/T 8981-708 - Melbourne and Metropolitan Board of Works.
  4. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 7608-052 - CRB - C/T 9092-292.
  5. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 7608-052 - CRB - C/T 9092-291.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 7608-052 - subdivision l/p 121820 - Patrick Joseph Clancy of 54 Glass Street Essendon Farmer as to one equal undivided half part or share and Helen Therese Clancy of 39 Blyberg Street Jacana Widow (administratrix of the estate of James Clancy deceased) as to the other one equal undivided half part or share as proprietors as tenants in common - C/T 9341-816 to 9341-822.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 9399-080 - Gavin M Collins Nominees Pty Ltd of 22 Raymond Street Ashwood.
  8. [S15] Newspaper - Village Bell "026-1982, p12."
  9. [S149] Electoral Roll for Australia, 1949.
  10. [S38] Index of burials in the cemetery of Keilor,.
Last Edited9 Feb 2019

Dr John Blair

M, #3179, b. 9 Mar 1834, d. 9 Mar 1887
Dr John BLAIR
Father*Alexander Blair b. 11 May 1800, d. b 7 Jul 1871
Mother*Margaret Paris b. 1802
Place in Upper Beac* Walnut Grove. Named after the property 'Walnut Grove' owned by Dr John Blair. This property was used as the female Inebriate Retreat in the 1890s. 
Birth*9 Mar 1834 Bo'ness, Linlithgowshire / West Lothian, Scotland. [par Alexander BLAIR & Margaret PARIS]1 
Marriage*27 Apr 1867 Spouse: Mary Hunter. VIC, Australia, #M1914.2
 
Marriage-Notice*6 May 1867Blair—Hunter.—On the 27th ult., by the Rev. A. Robertson, John Blair, M.R.C.S. Ed., to Mary, daughter of A. Hunter, Esq. No cards.3 
Anecdote*1870Alfred Hospital. Proposals for a new general hospital, long resisted by the Melbourne Hospital medical establishment, were revived in the wake of the 1868 assassination attempt in Sydney on HRH Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh. The Alfred Hospital was constructed on a 15-acre (6 ha) reserve at Commercial Road, Prahran, in 1870 to the pavilion design of architect Charles Webb. James Service, later Premier of Victoria, and the surgeon, Dr John Blair, were to become principal founders and Haldane Colquhoun Turriff first matron.
One of the six trained Nightingale nurses sent to the Sydney Infirmary from St Thomas's Hospital, Turriff set high standards of patient care, but her unreliable temper made life hazardous for colleagues. It was her untrained successor, Mrs Strong, who developed the Alfred Hospital Nurse Training School launched by Blair on 1 December 1880.
The hospital committee granted the head of the nursing division professional status from the outset. It also pioneered the concept of opening the hospital to paying patients, and during the 1880s permitted relatively early introduction into general hospital practice of several clinical specialities. It also hosted the now autonomous Baker Medical Research Institute, funded initially by Thomas Baker and his family in 1926.
The Alfred introduced clinical training for medical students in 1888, enabling Melbourne's first female medical undergraduates to obtain essential clinical experience denied them elsewhere. The Clinical School was abandoned in 1894 as the distance from the University of Melbourne made student numbers difficult to maintain. It was revived in 1910 but the problem remained until 1961 when the school affiliated with the Faculty of Medicine at Monash University.
The assumption of management of the Caulfield Convalescent Hospital in 1948, together with the Alfred's status as an accident and emergency base, teaching hospital and centre for clinical research, has ensured its centrality to government health service policies as these change in response to demographic and budgetary demand.4 
Land-UBeac*5 May 1877Dr John Blair selected land from the Crown. PAK-115. 19a 2r 5p - Land File 72/49. Govt Land Sale 4983, upset price £1, valued £92. Crown Grant to J. BLAIR on 7 Jan 1879.5,6 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelApr 1881 Sailing with Mary Blair to Bombay, India. Ship Hydaspes II - travelling to England.7
 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel3 Apr 1882 Sailing with Mary Blair to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Indus from England
Medical - Age 45.7
Land-UBeac*26 Mar 1886 PAK-115. Transfer from Dr John Blair to Archibald Dickson Hunter. Now tenants in common.8 
Land-UBeac26 Mar 1886 PAK-79.79A.111.112.113. Transfer from Archibald Dickson Hunter to Dr John Blair. Dr John BLAIR & Archibald Dickson HUNTER were tenants in common.9,10 
Land-Note*1 Dec 1886 Mortgagee: The Federal Bank of Australia Limited. The Federal Bank of Australia Ltd provided a mortgage over the land PAK-79.79A.111.112.113 and possibly PAK-114. It was discharged on 31 Oct 1890.. Mortgagor was Archibald Dickson Hunter Dr John Blair. 
Death*9 Mar 1887 101 Collins street east, Melbourne, VIC, Australia, #D2881 (Age 49) [par Alex BLAIR & Mary PARIS].2 
Death-Notice*10 Mar 1887BLAIR -On the 9th inst, at his residence, 101 Collins-street east Melbourne, John Blair, MD, FRCS. Ed., aged 49 years.
THE Friends of the late JOHN BLAIR, MD, FRCS Edinburgh, will leave his late residence 101 Collins street east, and proceed to the place of interment in the Melbourne General Cemetery, THIS DAY (Thursday, 10th inst), at 3 o'clock.11 
Land-Note*6 Apr 1887 After her husband's death, Mary BLAIR was the sole beneficiary in his will. Probate included Freehold property situate in the Parish of Pakenham containing 80 acres and 7 perches being Crown Allotments 79.79A.111.112 and 113 enclosed and subdivided with post and rail and slat fence and on which land is erected a loghouse with iron roof containing 7 rooms, kitchen, dairy, storeroom, man's room, and 2 stalled stable, rated at £30 valued at £1429 in which deceased held a half interest jointly with Mr A D Hunter £714. Freehold property situate at Pakenham aforesaid Crown allotment 115 containing 19 acres 2 roods and 5 perches, no improvements valued at £195. The inventory also listed £87.10.0 of furniture at Beaconsfield. 
Probate (Will)*6 Apr 1887 33/885. Probate included Freehold property situate in the Parish of Pakenham containing 80 acres and 7 perches being Crown Allotments 79.79A.111.112 and 113 enclosed and subdivided with post and rail and slat fence and on which land is erected a loghouse with iron roof containing 7 rooms, kitchen, dairy, storeroom, Man's room, and 2 stalled stable, rated at £30 valued at £1429 in which deceased held a half interest jointly with Mr A D Hunter £714. Freehold property situate at Pakenham aforesaid Crown allotment 115 containing 19 acres 2 roods and 5 perches, no improvements valued at £195.12 
Land-UBeac6 Apr 1887 PAK-79.79A.111.112.113. Transfer from Dr John Blair to Mary Blair. Mary Blair was the beneficiary of Dr John Blair's will. Mary BLAIR & Archibald Dickson HUNTER are now tenants in common.13,14 
Note*1913 James Brunton Stephens (b. 1835, d. 1902).
To Bo'ness belongs the honour of being the birthplace of James Brunton Stephens, the poet of the Australian Commonwealth. His father was John Stephens, who filled the office of parochial schoolmaster of Borrowstounness from 1808 to 1845 with much dignity and ability. The school and schoolhouse were then situated in what is now known as George Place. James was born in August, 1835. His early education was received from his father, and among his schoolmates were John Marshall and John Blair, who became well-known doctors, the first in Crieff, and the latter in Melbourne, Australia.15  
Anecdote22 Sep 2003Learning from the Chinese (Lateline)
During the middle of the 19th Century, the British colony of Victoria was one of the epicentres of gold fever-the society was in a state of flux, in a transition mode. Peoples and cultures from various parts of the continent as well as other continents were flocking to the colony in their hundreds of thousands in search of gold.
From 1851-1859, the population in the colony jumped from 97,489 to more than half a million (521,070). There were local aborigines, settlers from Europe, New World, China and the Asia Pacific.
Medicine in the Victorian colony was diverse, plural, complicated and idiosyncratic. The indigenous Aboriginal healer treating his or her community co-existed with the allopaths, emerging scientific medicine men, homeopaths, chemists, dentists, herbalists, naturopaths and traditional Chinese medical practitioners who were then referred to as Chinese herbalists.
In the census of 1861, there were 61 Chinese herbalists, and aboriginal healers, while there 592 physicians, surgeons, apothecaries, oculises and dentists.
Diphtheria, a virulent bacterial infection which leads to the formation of a leathery membrane on the throat and sometimes fatal suffocation swept through the Victorian colony in the middle of the 19th Century. Most of the victims of the epidemic were children. In 19872, it was reported that 600 people perished annually from diphtheria in Australia. At this time, the epidemic also hit Britain, Europe, the Americas and China. The disease is referred in Chinese as bai hou (white throat).
As the diphtheria epidemic raged in the colony, a group of Chinese herbalists were thrown into the limelight for their success in the treatment of the disease.
News of the success of the Chinese herbalists with their treatment technologies- new to many of the British colonists-in the treatment of diphtheria, spread like wild fire throughout the colony. A letter written by a reader of the Australian Medical Journal and published in 1870 wrote:
My Dear Sir,
You have on former occasions been very kind to me, and this emboldens me to ask from you another favour. Diphtheria has been very prevalent here, and most fatal in its effects. The disease was equally virulent at Vaughn, where I formerly resided, and where my oldest son died of it. There was a Chinese doctor resident at Vaughn, who went about amongst the poorest at first, and latterly amongst the better class, blowing a powder on the diphtheric pellicles of those afflicted. And am compelled to admit, through a world of prejudice, with great advantage to his clients I have spoken to several sensible, intelligent though unprofessional people, who all profoundly believe that there is "something in it." I have procured some of "Johns" magic powder, and if it is so be, that there is anything in it I hope that you will have the powder examined by some expert-I mean the parcel forwarded-and so that if there is any real virtue in the powder, we may reap the advantage therefrom and not permit "John" to have a monopoly of the glad tidings. Trusting that you will pardon my intruding on your valuable time. I am, my dear Sir, yours most truly.
J. Burn Malcolm, Hargreaves Street, Castlemaine, June 25th 1870.
Considering the severity of the diphtheria epidemic and the interests in the Chinese medicinal powder, on August 13, 1874, the Victorian Parliament debated a proposal to run a trial to establish the efficacy of the Chinese diphtheria powder. Subsequently, the Victorian Parliament decided to turn the trials. It was proposed that the trial of the powder be conducted by the Chinese herbalist Ah Sue who should be employed by the Government to run the project. It was proposed that Ah Sue administer the remedy himself. At the same time, the trial will be under the inspection of the (Western) medical men but without their interference.
Unfortunately, the responsibility of "ascertaining the value" of the diphtheria powder fell in to the hands of a Western scientific surgeon from the Alfred Hospital in Melbourne, Dr. John Blair.
Using the medical resources pf the Medical Society of Victoria, Dr. Blair secured four packets of the diphtheria powder used by Ah Sue and another Chinese herbalist by the name of Fee Mun. Then, using the laboratory facilities of the then Technology Museum he had the contents of the powder "qualitatively examined."
According to Dr Blair, the "Chinaman powder contains nothing new". It is "composed of alum, carbonate of lime, nitrate of potash, sulphate of sodium, sulfate of copper, nitrate and chlorate of potash with camphor and mush added to give them odor."
Speaking before a meeting of the MSV, Dr. Blair boasted
"We know the nature of their composition, and can easily comprehend the mode of their action." … That when the powder is blown in to the fauces the preparation can act as astringents, caustics, or eschariotics"
In the hands of an ignorant man, Dr. Blair declared these local preparations would be productive of a grievous amount of harm.
After his 'expert technical interpretation' of the 'facts' emanating from the Technology Museum, Dr. Blair then followed with personal and racist attacks against the Chinese herbalists. He called Ah Sue an "ignorant pretender" who has "received no medical Chinese education whatsoever". He claimed that the powder they were using were substances for everyday use for throat disease which were picked up form the local chemist shops.
In 1874, Dr. Blair and his supporters no doubt saw themselves as developing and expressing a set of standards for medical practice and health care in the developing colony of Victoria. Given the complex situation of health care at that time, his application of standards was recognizable to many as interested and biased. It was recognizable to many as a form of standardization that amounted to the domination by the emergent empiric school of medical practice. This school was represented by a particular class in the colony at that time, the ruling class, who benefited from legislation which forbade anyone who did not hold "a bachelor of Apothecaries Society of London, a member of the College Physicians or Surgeons in the United Kingdom or Ireland, or had served in the sea or land service (of the British Empire)."
It is not that the system of traditional Chinese medical practice did not have standards, nor that it was not sensitive to standardization. It is that at this point in Australia's history these standards could not be worked with those that officially regulated practices of both medicine and health care. There needs to be a lot of translation work on both sides if standards from alternative traditions are to be articulated. That was the work that satisfied patients were doing with their testimony, work that was taken up by their parliamentary representatives. But equally work must be done if the standards are to be dis-articulated. That was the work of Dr. Blair's 'trial'. It opposed the work of those who were seeking to articulate the standards of Chinese medical practice in the colony of Victoria and it used the resources of the emerging scientific institutions of the colony.16 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
6 Jun 1841South Street, Borrowstounness (Bo'ness), West Lothian, Scotland(Head of Household) Alexander Blair;
Age 6
Member(s) of Household: Margaret Blair Elizabeth Blair17
30 Mar 1851John KERR (a Journeyman Joiner), Jamaica Street No. 4, Edinburgh, Midlothian, ScotlandAge 17 - Druggist's Shopman (Lodger)18

Grave

  • Presbyterian Section N 404/405, Melbourne General Cemetery, Carlton, VIC, Australia, John BLAIR MD died 9 Mar 1887; our Lani died 18 Jan 1900 age 17 yrs.19

Family

Mary Hunter b. 1838, d. 2 Aug 1921
Child 1.Lani Mulgrave Blair44 b. 1883, d. 16 Jan 1900

Newspaper-Articles

  • 20 Dec 1867, Excerpt from Illuminations ... Mr L.Schott had a lyre under a rising sun, and within a foliated border, with the motto, "Greet him with music and song." Dr. J. Blair had several small transparencies in his upper windows, and handsome colored lanterns in the lower ones. Messrs Garrard and James, surgeons, had at star in gas jets, before a colored reflector, and below, "Welcome, Prince Alfred:" Mr Wallan, dentist, the Prince's arms; Dr. Girdlestone, a pretty display of colored lanterns. At Punch-office, there was a transparency of the funny gentleman himself, and Messrs Grover and Baker had the arms of our royal visitor, both as Prince and Duke. Mr Wragge, chemist, manifested his loyalty by displaying a handsome star ; and Mr Eldridge, dyer, expressed his by means of a bright sunlight in the centre of which there was the letter A. Before the handsome Grecian portico in front of the Baptist Church, at the opposite side of the street, there was a star of gas, which was brilliantly reflected on Mr Stitch's principle ; and in the centre of the star there was a handsome colored crown in the bas relief. At the establishment of Mr Stokes, nearly opposite, the two faces of his medal commemorating the Duke's visit, were shown in a transparency, the central device of which was the arms of the City of Edinburgh, which are to appear on one side of a gold medal Mr Stokes is about to strike off to the order of the City Council, and to commemorate the laying of the foundation stone of the new Town Hall by his Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh.20
  • 20 Aug 1870, THE PRINCE ALFRED MEMORIAL HOSPITAL.
    It was in August, 1866, that (a project having been formed for adding a new wing to the Melbourne Hospital) Dr. Blair, in a letter to one of the Melbourne journals, first directed public attention to the over-crowded state of that institution, the danger attending the addition of any more buildings on the site, and so curtailing the grounds, and the pestilential effluvium then arising from the open drain in Swanston street, by means or which the whole of the drainage of the Hospital was carried off. In this letter the doctor advocated the necessity for abundance of fresh air for patients, and at the same time maintained that it is not only our duty to provide for the sick, but in doing so to be careful of the health of the rest of the population ; and he therefore maintained that, instead of adding an additional wing to the overcrowded and cramped Hospital, a new institution should be built away from the centre of the city. This letter had a greater effect, probably, than the writer ever dreamed of. The forcible manner in which the danger of the then mode of drainage was placed before the public induced almost immediate remedial measures, and now that cause of complaint has been removed. At the same time, the arguments of Mr. Blair were such that the Press unanimously fell in with his views, and a large portion of the public sided with him. The result was that in a very short time a tangible movement for the establishment of a second hospital was initiated ; and on the 28th September, 1868, a meeting was held at Scott's hold, when it was resolved to erect a new hospital, rather than support the addition to the old institution. The Hon. James Service, the late Mr. F. B. Franklyn, Mr. J. M'Kenzie, and Mr. L. J. Sherrard, all took a very active part in the movement. Mr. Blair was appointed hon. secretary, and very soon the subscriptions came in so freely as to warrant the committee in regarding the project as a success. The question of the site was then raised, and so many eligible places were suggested that there was some discussion before anything definite could be arrived at. It was at last decided to erect the new building on a site granted by the Government on the St. Kilda road, a little more than two miles from the centre of the city, and between the St. Kilda Park and other permanent recreation reserves. The Government were induced in 1868 to place £5,000 as a grant-in-aid on the Estimates, and a similar amount was voted by Parliament in 1869. Before this latter sum was voted, however, it had been urged on the Government that the new institution should be a hospital for incurable and convalescent patients ; and this view was so strongly urged in the Assembly that the Chief Secretary wrote to the hon. secretary, urging it on the committee, and expressing the opinion that if they did not fall in with the suggestion it might seriously endanger the chance of the institution obtaining further endowment. Mr. Blair replied on behalf of the committee, effectually silencing the suggestion, and since then, the committee have not been impeded in their labours by any further suggestions.
    The first general meeting of the subscribers was held on the 1st March last, and from the balance-sheet then submitted it appeared that the private subscriptions had amounted to £4,937 11s. 2d. The fancy dress ball in aid of the funds yielded £500 ; a portion of the Taranaki fund received by the committee was £761 13s. 2d; and Parliament had voted altogether £10,000, so that the whole of the available funds up to that time amounted to £16,209 4s. 4d. This then is a short history of the origin and advancement of the project for building the Alfred Memorial Hospital. Having a considerable sum of money in hand, the committee, at the end of 1868, advertised for competitive designs for the new institution, offering two premiums of £50 and £25 for the second and third best design, the author of the design approved of to be appointed architect. This liberal offer had the desired effect, and fourteen designs were sent in. The board of non-competing architects having examined all these, approved of the design sent in by Mr. Charles Webb, who was therefore appointed architect, and his design it is which is now being put into a practical form on one of the most beautiful sites that could possibly have been selected. The reserve had formerly been granted to the Borough Council of Prahran as a recreation ground for the inhabitants of that borough, and the council had expended about £300 in fencing and other improvements. These improvements were all given over to the committee free of cost, and they thus became possessed of a securely-fenced site, about ten acres in extent, in one of the most healthy places around Melbourne, and one which will probably long retain its present suburban appearance on account of the public parks around. In May last year, the design haying been decided upon, tenders for the erection of a portion of the building were opened, and that sent in by Mr. J. Wood was accepted, the amount altogether being £17,083 17s. 11d., and the contract to be finished by the 28th of this month. So far, the contractor has advanced well with his work ; and in spite of having had to contend with one of the most severe winters ever known in the colony, he will probably be finished with his part by two or three weeks after the contract time. Of the building, it is necessary, in the first place, to state that it is designed on the pavilion principle, which has been found to be the most suitable for such institutions. It will when completed, consist of what is known as the administration block, four pavilions—two on each side of the centre, or administration block—and kitchen, laundry, and other such offices, under one roof at the rear ; the whole being connected by terraces, or covered ways. The accommodation afforded by the whole of these buildings will be sufficsent for about 300 patients, the medical staff, nurses, and servants, allowing about 2,000 cubic feet for each person. The contract now being carried out is for the administration block, one pavilion, and the kitchen premises, which will, when completed, fitted up, and furnished, place the committee in a position to open about seventy beds to the public, probably about October or November next. The style of architecture adopted in the design is Elizabethan. The walls are all of ornamental brickwork, tuck-pointed throughout externally, and resting on solid bluestone basements. The walls have also string courses and dressings. While in Elizabethan architecture, from the fact of its being so very full in every particular, but little scope is left for ornamentation, the architect has yet been able to produce a design at once so light and pleasing in appearance that from the specimen now erected there can be no doubt but that when finished the building will be a great ornament to the locality. The administration block contains on the ground floor an out-patients' room, 18ft. by 39ft; a dispensary, 18ft. x 20ft; two casualty rooms, each 15ft. x 18ft; surgeons' and physicians' private room, 15ft. x 18ft; large board-room, officers' dining-room, secretary's and clerk's rooms, porter's room and offices, besides a large entrance hall, bathroom, lavatory, and closets. A flight of stone steps leads to the upper floor, where there are two large wards, each 18ft. by 60ft., superintendent's and matron's rooms, medical officer's room, library, nurses' room, and again every
    accommodation in the way of bathrooms, lavatories, and closets. In fact, every portion of the building is well supplied in the latter respect. The rooms on both floors are 16ft. high through out the building. There will be accommodation for about sixty patients in the upper floor of the administration block. The pavilion now erected is the one nearest the centre block on the eastern side, and is connected with the main building by terraces on each floor, the lower one being covered.
    It contains on the lower floor a large ward, 24ft. by 125ft. and 16ft. high ; two small wards, each 22ft. x 18ft., and the necessary nurses' rooms, bath-rooms, lavatories, etc. The upper storey is in point of accommodation a facsimile of the lower floor. Altogether this will afford room for about sixty beds, so that when the present contract is completed, the committee will be able to offer about seventy or eighty beds to those who are unfortunate enough to need them. The kitchen, laundry, etc., are situated at the rear of the centre block, and are approached by a covered way. It consists merely of the ground floor, and includes under one roof a kitchen 40ft. by 20ffc., laundry the same size, scullery, engine-room, drying-room, cooks' and laundresses' rooms, and all other requisite conveniences for carrying on the necessarily extensive cooking and washing operations connected with an institution containing 300 sick persons and their attendants.
    The ventilation has been well attended to throughout, but more especially in the pavilion. The air enters through ventilators on the level of the floor, completely sweeps across the rooms, and escapes as fast as it becomes heated and unhealthy through similar patent ventilators near the level of the ceiling. By this means that essential to all sick persons, a continual but not strong current of fresh air, is insured. The provision for drainage is also excellent, although the hospital stands on apparently a flat site. The whole of the buildings at present erected have been substantially and satisfactorily carried out under the supervision of Mr. J. Avery, the clerk of works, who was appointed by the committee as soon as the work was commenced. The present contract will cost the committee a trifle over £17,000, irrespective of architects' fees and the salary of the clerk of works ; and, in addition to this, about £2,750 more will be necessary for furniture, beds and bedding, fittings, cooking apparatus, engine, another such requirements. By the middle of next month the present contractors will probably be finished, and then will follow the fitting up, so that by the end of October, or the beginning of November, the committee will be in a position to start active operations in dispensing charity to those who may unfortunately need it. Those leading minds in the movement, who, in the face of strenuous opposition from various quarters, have energetically pushed the project to such a highly successful termination, are to be congratulated that they now see immediately before them the realisation of a large amount of practical good from their efforts ; and it is to be hoped that, having once made a start in this direction, the funds placed at their disposal will enable them at no very distant date to complete the hospital and all its adjuncts.21
  • 9 Sep 1870, We are informed an action for libel has been commenced by Dr. Blair against Mr. Clarson (of Messrs. Clarson, Shallard and Co.); damages laid at £1000. The alleged libel was contained in a circular lately issued to tho subscribers of the Alfred Hospital, chargiug Dr. Blair with unprofessional conduct; that gentleman being at the time a candidate for the appointment of honorary surgeon to that institution.22
  • 17 Oct 1870, Dr. Blair, the hon. secretary of the Alfred Hospital, received a telegram on Saturday evening from the hon. Eliot Yorke, stating that H.R.H. the Duke of Edinburgh had great pleasure in accepting the invitation to be present at the ball to celebrate the opening of the institution.23
  • 1 Mar 1872, LAW REPORT. SUPREME COURT. CIVIL SITTINGS BEFORE EASTER TERM.
    OLD COURT HOUSE.—THURSDAY, FEB. 29.
    Before his Honour Mr. Justice Barry, and a Special Jury of Twelve.)
    CLARSON AND WIFE V. BLAIR.
    The hearing of this action was continued from the previous day. Plaintiffs are Mr. W. Clarson and his wife Caroline, and the defendant Mr. J. Blair, surgeon. The action is brought to recover damages for three indecent assaults on Mrs. Clarson, and also for libel on her. Plea "Not Guilty."
    Mr. Billing, Mr. Dunne, and Mr. Fisher, for plaintiffs; Mr. Ireland, Q.C., Mr. Higinbotham, and Mr. Wrixon, for defendant.
    The examination of Mrs. Clarson was resumed. She deposed,—I mentioned yesterday a letter I had written to Blair, after the aggression on the 24th June, 1864. After I left on that occasion I was greatly impressed with the fearful risk of what I said to Blair after this aggression, inducing him to think that I had left him upon conditions, and I wrote in consequence of that. I wrote to him on the 24th or 25th June. Subsequently to sending that letter I saw Blair, but had no conversation referring further to the risk. In September, 1864, I remember passing his house in the afternoon ; I believe it was about the 17th of the month. I had a pain in my left breast at the time, and, seeing Blair in the hall, I went in to consult him. I told him how I felt, and he asked me to allow him to see it. He was sitting in a chair near the table. I unfastened my dress, and bent towards him to show him my bosom. He drew me between his knees, and felt my breast, which he said was swollen, but that he did not think any harm would come of it, and that it would soon be better. While I was standing up fastening my dress, he placed his hand upon me in an objectionable manner.
    Mr. IRELAND remarked, that such evidence was inadmissible, but that it would be prejudicial to his client if he raised any objection to it.
    Mr DUNNE, to witness.—You may relate anything he said, but I cannot ask you what he did on this occasion.
    Examination continued.—I left immediately after his aggression. As I was going he said, "You have left your purse on the table," and handed it to me. I then left. Three or four days later I wrote him a long letter, which I did not send, and a short note, which I did. In the note I asked him to call on me, but did not refer to any past transactions. I think I told him I had a letter written which I wished him to read, but which I was precluded from send-ing him. He did read that letter, and it was destroyed immediately. As nearly as I can recollect, I told him in it that the effects of his conduct—his disgusting conduct—on my mind had made me feel as if I had had a serious bilious attack, without experiencing any relief, and also that it had, as it were, at one blow severed me from my husband. I also told him I had sent him a letter be-cause I was determined never to go into his house again unless he promised me firmly that I should never be subjected to another indelicate attack from him. In all those letters I censured him severely, but in kind terms. I knew a Mr. Friend, of Geelong, a solicitor. When he had read the long letter Blair apologised to me, and said he was very sorry for what he had done, and that I should have no more occasion to find fault with him. He said he would never believe that God had given men such feelings unless—I forget the direct words—they were meant to be in-dulged. I replied "No, God created or gave marriage for that purpose." In the October following my husband brought me home a present. After I received it I saw Blair at his house. I went there because my mind had been upset. My memory fails me as to what occurred at that interview. I said to him "My husband's goodness inclines me to tell him all." He asked if anything had transpired likely to injure him. I said I did not know, but that I hoped not. I do not remember Blair ever going on his knees to me, but he has stooped, and, with tears in his eyes, has asked me not to think evil of the past, or to think evil of him on account of the past. On one occasion, when I referred to the danger of my telling my husband what had happened, Blair said. "Good God, I shall be shot." During 1865 I frequently saw him. He was on visiting terms with my husband, as usual—even more so than usual. He was more frequently at our house than ever, and was always welcomed by us. He went on several shooting excursions with my husband. I was at Blair's house during that year, more often as a patient than as a visitor. I believe my husband went in occasionally. I became acquainted with Miss Hunter in 1863. She is now Mrs. Blair. She came to my house as a visitor. Blair did not become acquainted with her at my house. I have been informed there was a breach of promise between them before I knew them. But they subsequently became reconciled, and were friends when I knew them. In September, 1866, I first became aware that they were engaged. He was in the habit of visiting at my house the same time that Miss Hunter was there. I remember receiving a letter from Blair, dated December 28, 1865, in which, in accordance with a promise previously made, he told me that he was thinking of getting married. In that letter he promised further details, and expressed the hope that once and for all our disputes might be settled. He further said, "I am very sorry to be the cause of pain to you, knowing the delicate state of your nervous system. For the past, pray accept my apology ; and I earnestly trust for the future, our friendship may continue uninterrupted." I remember having a conversation with Blair on August 7, 1865, respecting an operation. He said a simple surgical operation would enable me to have children. A little before this interview, I told Blair that I had thought much of what he had told me about the operation, and that for my husband's sake, and also, as it might be the means of passing off my mind more effectually, I was quite willing to suffer any sacrifice that the operation might be performed. He said, "Oh no, let nature do its own work—you are far too unselfish." I was disappointed at his views, for I felt I could not go to anyone else. He refused to perform the operation. I wrote to him next day, urging him to take the matter into his consideration. I generally addressed him in my letters in very affectionate terms. I might have written "My Dearest Doctor," but I never addressed him otherwise than in his capacity as a doctor. I have addressed him as "My Darling Doctor." I generally wrote long letters to him. I wrote on this occasion that in consequence of all I had suffered in the past I did not care whether I lived or died, that his secret would be safe with me, as I would die rather than tell of it, and that even if I died through the opera-tion he need have no fear. He called on me after this letter, on the second day after. I asked him if he thought me too old to have this operation performed, and also asked what age he thought me. He said somewhere between 30 and 40. I said, "Tell me truly what you think ; I shall not care if you think me 50." He replied, "Oh, well, 35." I asked him if he had brought his instruments with him, for I quite thought he had come to do as I wished. Witness gave his reply, and added—I knew he meant something wrong by that, and said, "Oh, doctor, I never thought of anyone but my husband being the father of my child." [Witness here became so much affected and faint that she had to be accommodated with a chair, and the examination was discontinued for a short time.]
    Examination continued.—Defendant made no observation in reply to the last remark I made. He went away almost immediately. Knew a Mrs. Wimble who resided at Northcote. Gave a photograph to her, and to Miss Hunter, who was residing with her. The photograph produced is one of myself. I had only two photographs taken of me in this (a sitting) position. The photograph produced (exhibit B) is one of them. It was taken by a wandering photographer. Had never any copies of this photograph taken. I am familiar with Mr. Blair's handwriting. The letter produced is in his writing (exhibit C) :—
    "Sir.—Your wife's communications by letters and packets duly received, I need not add, contributing not a little to our amusement.
    "Enclosed is a little bit for the pamphlet, if you can find space, accompanied with an order for 15 copies (if it be well printed).
    "The accompanying work of art may either be used to illuminate the book, or it may come in handy as a design for a transparency at the forthcoming Zoological picnic."
    Was not present when that letter was received. [Photograph (exhibit D) handed to witness.] I know nothing of the mutilation of this picture. I only saw it when I was looking over the papers for the last trial. The word "copy" on it is in Mr. Blair's writing. The reference to the receipt of letters and packets in exhibit C refers to a letter to him, and one I sent to him, en-closing copies I sent to his mother in Scot-land and his wife, and to a packet I sent to Mrs. Blair. Wrote a letter to the subscribers to the Alfred Hospital on 22nd August 1870. [Letter handed in—exhibit E.] The reference in Mr. Blair's letter to the pamphlet is to one I told him l would write myself. It is not the one published by my husband. When I lived at Royal terrace I took lessons in horse exercise from a lady. Afterwards we went to East Melbourne, and one day in December, 1866, we expected a visit from Miss Hunter. She did not come as proposed to spend a day, and Mr. Blair was to come later. Miss Hunter came late in the evening with Mr. Blair. I believe I was not in the house at the time. A day or two after, about 5 o'clock, Mr. Blair's carriage drove past, with two ladies, whom I believed to be Miss Hunter and Mrs. Wimble. I went to Mr. Blair's house, in Collins street, to ask why they had not come to my place as arranged. I thought I might meet Miss Hunter there. I stayed till nearly 7 o'clock, when his carriage drove to the door. He got down to open the door and Miss Hunter went into the surgery. I was in the reception-room, and said, "Stay, doctor, I wish to speak to Miss Hunter." I said to her, "I came to know the reason you treated me like this, Miss Hunter ; you could not treat a beggar like that ; if you were a lady you could not have done it." Miss Hunter turned to Blair, and said, "I thought there would be a row about it ;" and addressing me, said, "You were not at home when I did call." I said, "You know the attachment I form for a man or woman is sincere from my heart." Mr. Blair sat at the table, saying he was sorry it happened. I then went away. Mr. Blair opened the door and asked me to take a glass of wine, which I refused. Subsequently certain statements were made to me, in consequence of which I told my husband what had occurred. I was in the defendant's house twice after that interview with Miss Hunter, the first next morning, and the second on 7th January, 1867. Saw Mr. Blair, and said I understood he told me an untruth in reference to Miss Hunter going from Melbourne to Geelong and asked him why he deceived me in that matter. I made some reference to a promise of marriage, but he misunderstood me. He got up, and said, "As God lives I made no promise to Miss Hunter of marriage." I said, "You mistake me ; I don't mean that." He also said the reason Miss Hunter had not visited me on the appointed day was because Mr. Wimble had told him I introduced his wife and Miss Hunter to a lady of bad character. I asked him how he came to think so, and he said he only heard it from Mr. Wimble. I said, "Dr. Blair, did you not know I was not aware she was a woman of bad character, and did you not tell them I did not know it ? " He did not answer. Just then a buggy drove to the door, and he told me to go upstairs. I did go, but nothing particular happened after that. I was very angry, because I felt it was the greatest wrong he had done me. I don't remember when I told my husband. I bore it as long as I could. I think I told him about 10 days after this occurrence. On the same day as the interview to which I last alluded I wrote Mr. Blair a letter, saying, "This must end our correspondence." He called on me the next day, and spoke about it. I had written that I was annoyed at his allowing my friends to entertain that opinion of me, but I still thought I should be able to keep it from my husband. He said, "I am sorry you have had this quarrel with Miss Hunter." I said, "Miss Hunter is a nice young lady to find fault with my conduct after what you have told me, that you allowed her to enter your house with a latchkey." He said he really had not had time to read my letter. When I spoke about the latchkey he got up, very excited, and, putting his hand on his heart, said, "My latchkey, my latchkey," and walked away. That was the last time I saw him.
    Cross examined by Mr. IRELAND.—I was married in June, 1854. I was 50 years of age last birthday. I had no doubts of the impropriety of the defendant's conduct on the occasion of the aggression on 26th December, 1863.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Did you not consider it a gross and outrageous insult to you ?
    Witness.—Not while he was merely putting his arms round me to support me.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You said, "I am afraid you mistake the nature of my affectionate re-gard ?" How came you to have this affectionate regard ?
    Witness.—He had been an intimate ac-quaintance of mine as well as my doctor.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Were you in love with him ?
    Witness.—No, I was not. I highly regarded him. I entertained a friend's regard for him. After the transaction I have narrated I con-tinued on the same terms with my husband as before, but I did not then tell him what had occurred.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Why did you not call out when the defendant took liberties with you— a married woman—at the December visit ?
    Witness.—I have told you the state of my illness, and I could scarcely speak at the time. There was a little boy of about seven years of age in the waiting-room, near the reception room, where the interview took place. After this occurrence I went to the defendant's house for prescriptions.
    Mr. IRELAND.—How could you, as a modest woman, go back to a man who treated you in the abominable manner you describe ?
    Witness.—I do not know that I can explain more than I have.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Did you see any impropriety in it ?
    Witness.—I believe it is generally considered so.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Why did you go back after being so grossly insulted ?
    Witness.—I did not feel the impropriety as others might see it.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Why did you not cease to be his patient ?
    Witness.—I did not wish to break the peace. Circumstances led me to do so later.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Could you not discontinue your attendance without breaking the peace ?
    Witness.—I do not think so, because he was intimate with us, and it would have been impossible for me to have given up my medical man without my husband's know-ledge. If he had known it I must have told him everything.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Did the defendant mention to you that he never thought of insulting you ?
    Witness.—He did not say "insult." I said in a letter to him, that I could only consider his actions as a trial of my virtue.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Did you not say his first aggression might have been caused by your illness ?
    Witness.—Yes. On reflection, I think that my illness might have been the cause of it. His conduct, in the first instance, when he supported me in his arms, might have been justified by my illness, but not his wrong afterwards. I mean that his first acts towards me during my illness—what I may call his supporting actions—were caused through my illness, and that they might have induced him to do the other wrong.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You think that what he did first he did professionally, but that he went a little too far ?
    Witness.—Yes, truly so.
    Mr IRELAND.—Were you in love with him ? Witness.—No, not in your sense. I had a great regard for him.
    Mr. IRELAND.—So it appears.
    Witness.—I had known him for three years previously, during which he had not been guilty of a wrong look or a wrong act.
    Mr. IRELAND.—On the 23rd June, 1864, you had a conversation with him about the baby ?
    Witness.—Not the baby, but a baby. I did not consider it at all improper to have such a conversation with my medical man.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Did you consider it modest and proper for you, after the manner you had been treated, to have such a conversation with him ?
    Witness.—I know I ought never to have entered his house again.
    Mr. IRELAND.—How many years did it take you to find that out ?
    Witness.—It was not until 1867 I found it out. Circumstances afterwards transpired that left me without liberty to act otherwise. I was at his house in 1867, and I went there twice after the interview I have described, at which his present wife was present.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Did you see no impropriety in it ?
    Witness.—No, I was not thinking at all of it. I know it was wrong, and I have never made it out right. I did not feel in a position to be rid of him. As time went on I knew that greater evil was involved, and I felt greater fear at telling my husband or allowing him to know all the past.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You first saw the necessity of mentioning the matter after Blair was married?
    Witness.—That is false. I named the matter to my husband within a week or 10 days after I last saw the defendant.
    Mr. IRELAND.—After you saw Miss Hunter spent the evening there?
    Witness.—Yes. I took an interest in Miss Hunter's movements because she was a mutual friend.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Because the defendant allowed some observation about you to go unchallenged, you considered he had been guilty of an extreme wrong to you—worse even than the liberties he took with you?
    Witness.—I felt it so. That other wrong was more against my husband than myself.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You seem to have taken it very easily?
    Witness.—That was my fault. It was not because I did not feel it. I have not mentioned all the occasions I was at the defend-ant's house. I was there in the daytime and the evening, sometimes alone. I took a great interest in him, but I had no evil thoughts on that account. I have been in his house when he was out, but I did not take my work there. I have been in his bedroom when he was out. I took the measurements of his bed in order to make some crape curtains for it. I made the curtains, and sent them to his house to be put up. The defendant had told Mr. Clarson at our house that he could not rest at night, as he was so tormented with mosquitoes. That was what induced me to make them. I had no evil feeling in doing it. I have sent him flowers, slippers, a cigar case, fruit, &c. I once sent him some mince pies.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Did he not repeatedly beg you to discontinue your visits?
    Witness.—Never. Yes, on one occasion he was angry at my coming about dinner-time. I came to show him a drawing I had been doing as a lesson he set me. He proposed to teach me drawing because my mind was often burdened by his conduct. He never handed me back a bundle of letters, telling me that he had never opened some of them, or read most of them. I saw some of my letters to him in a drawer of his that was open, and I said, "Why keep my letters?" He said, "Oh, I don't know." I then said, "Why not destroy them?" He told me that if any other person saw them they wonld look upon them as criminal but that he understood the contrary. I have written letters to his present wife, and they have been returned to my husband. I sent open letters through the post addressed to his wife; I was determined she should read them. They were sometimes returned to my husband.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Did you go to Robertson and Moffatt's and get a stay-box, and send it, directed to Mrs. Blair, with a letter inside it? Witness.—I had a stay box by me, and I put one of Robertson and Moffatt's tickets on it, and sent a letter inside it to Mrs Blair. I sent a letter to Mrs. Blair, of Glasgow, the mother of the defendant. The defendant did not refuse to accept my presents, but he said, "Oh don't trouble yourself; I am ashamed of your kindness." I sent a letter to the de-fendant on May 5, 1864. The following are extracts from it:
    "My very dear Doctor,—Although so, in the first place (or rather in the next) I am going to tell you that you are a very disadreable creature for your disobedience to my wishes, and that at a time when I could not scold you for it, viz., outside the door of the house.
    I have told you before never to trouble me by telling me that you are ashamed to accept the little proofs my friendship towards you, and I think it very unkind of you to do so. You know the time will come when I shall not be able to thus indulge, although my heart's warmth will not have abated, and so, why deprive me now of one of the pleasures of my life? 'Tis really very selfish of you; and if I had not an affectionate regard for you, in spite of all your faults, all would return upon myself.
    "Of course, dearest doctor, joking aside, if I really thought my little presents were annoying to you, I would desist; but I trust you do not feel them so. I scarcely know what to say to help you to feel, or look upon them as I would wish you to. I can only think of, as if they were sent by one of your sisters or your mother, or an aunt—not that I mean I resemble either, in one sense, but I think you might look upon my acts as thus homely in this matter.
    "If you could feel towards me as I do to you, you would better understand the purely disinterested affection which must display itself in the best form it may according to circumstances.
    "I feel a little sorry you thought fit to tell me who it was with you on Monday, because I am half afraid you will think me unwar-rantably interested about you in such matters ; but my dear friend, you must not, for I feel sufficiently at home with you to ask you, if I particularly wish to know anything about your love affairs. By the by, this reminds me that I have something of the sort to ask you about, when I am able to get out and call on you again.
    "In conclusion on this subject I would say, if I thought you would be happier for it, I should be happy to see you married to-morrow. As I have told you before, if you could have a right to, and had, fifty wives, it would not make my affection for you the less; therefore, you see, 'tis not of a nature to feel opposed to any proper connexion.
    "As you will see, dear doctor, the former part of this is a sort of introduction to the covered pots accompanying this, which I hope you will not look upon as too much like self-will ; if so, why then the tables will have to be turned, and you must scold me—really scold me I mean.
    "On Monday Mr. Clarson proposed sending you a joint of kangaroo, but I said no, for I thought it would be no use to you unless you had it set before you in some way more tasty than merely boiled or roasted; so I told him I would prepare you some. He said he 'was afraid I was not paying you any compliment by sending you cooked dishes.' I said I did not think you looked upon it in that light. I said also, it might not be any to your servant; but then I think she is too good-natured a creature, and simple, to feel hurt at anything of the kind sent by your friends. I wish I had the chance of teaching her, to the best of my knowledge, to add to your comfort in these little matters.—Your sincere little friend,
    CARRIE CLARSON.

    "P.S.—I scarce need add that if you knew how cheerful your little visits has made me, you would feel repaid in some measure for your mirey walk."
    Cross examination continued.—I also sent the defendant the following verses in 1864 :
    "With laurels his brow I'd deck,
    Barely none deserve so well As he whose life is given
    To 'suage pain, and mortal ill. Pink of woman's devotion,
    Acknowledg'd emblem bright;
    It's thy need through life unknown,
    But brightest in grief its light. What more faithful than a dog ?
    As thus may thy friendships prove; How great the boon, tell who can,
    Whose life's griefs by such are soothed. Oft in friendship's guise, alas !
    How many in life we meet,
    Nor trace in the sparkling draught
    There's poison with the sweet. Go, go, tell each emblem fair
    What friendship and love combined,
    Would ask for one while life lasts,
    And when life's bright scenes shall end.
    May peace and plenty he posses,
    Portrai'd by tbe dove and horn;
    A heart on gratitudes wing,
    Oft rise and heav'nward borne.
    But the earthborn friendships die, The heavenborn are without end, Thy greatest bliss, be it known,
    Is to feel thy God thy friend.
    Mon cher ami, thus stands reveal'd
    My heart's best wishes for thee, And surely if verified
    Heart ease will no stranger be.
    "CAROLINE 1864"

    Cross-examination continued.—I also wrote to the defendant in 1866, asking him to pro-cure tickets for the return ball of Friday, October 6, 1866. I wrote :-—
    "I know a lady who is going, if possible, as a vendor of flowers, a contribution towards the erection of a hospital in the suburbs. She will have with her an immense basket, with a suitable ticket, and the proceeds are to be placed in your hands, it being supposed that you will be there; and should it be that such a place is not built, it is to be handed over to the Orphan Asylum. This of course is a pro-found secret, but will you oblige me, and I will repay you the earliest opportunity. Yours obliged, "C. CLARSON.
    "P.S. If it was thought that you would not be there, I think the scheme would be given up."
    If my husband went with me the proceeds of the flowers were to go to the hospital, but if my son only accompanied me the money was to go to the Orphan Asylum. I sent the following letter to the defendant. The first leaf is torn in half (lengthways), and half returned to my husband with my photograph.
    Mr. IRELAND asked the plaintiffs to produce the missing fragment.
    It was not produced, and the remainder of the letter was then read :— . . . . "And again, dearest, one word for the future. I am sure it will not be beneath that philosophy to which you lay some claim, if you now also begin to think more of the future. The past you know, but not so that which is to come, and there is no need that the ignorance should render us unhappy ; and we are at all events on the safe side, if we lay asside from an abundance, especially for a rainy day, and should with William to be with me, it never comes to us, then will it not repay our forethought to have it to spare for the rainy days of others?
    "I know you enough, dear, to see how thoroughly characteristic you can be, then put it in practice more, for your own real good, and live not a life of dream, the awaking from which would only cause you and those who really love you sorrow. Are these not those on whom you're expending your affluence who are not worthy, and who would be the first to forsake you in the hour of trouble? They only care for you for the sake of what you are able to earn and place at their disposal. Be awakened, my own darling doctor, to the truth, shake off that dreamy state of things which forebodes no bright future, should you lose your health. I feel sure you will take this from me kindly. My affection is the scourse of my fears for your fu-ture, and not a spirit of mere interference or pre-sumption on your having proved that I at least sometimes have a place in your thoughts; and very dear are those thoughts to me, even if they only consist in, 'Well, I must call on her to day, to-morrow,' or any other time.
    "If I thought, dearest, what I have said above would vex you, I would never repeat it, but I have such a wish to be of some service to you, and were I situated differently, I should feel it no degradation to serve you by taking all the care of your house off your shoulders, while you remained as you are, my only object being that of doing you a service.
    "Of course, dear, I only speak of this as a figure, of how in any way I could serve you if opportunity offered, of which, of course their is little chance, for William often tells me, that should anything happen to him before myself, he will be able to leave me independent, and I should never marry again; but even that would not prevent me doing you such a service if you pleased to give me such a charge, or even now I would not hesitate to relieve you if a proper arrangement could be made.
    "I know how trying to the constitution must be your profession, and if your life and health is being consumed at the shrine of duty only, well, for 'tis better to wear out than rust out. But, loved one, if you are sacrificing your consti-tution, health, and good looks, additionally, for the sake of the pleasure of others, or even your own, you will in the future have that to regret so let me talk to you as any affec-tionate sister would to her brother whom she loves with great affection, you know my affection is even something beyond that for you ; well, then, make an effort to suppress the power your acquaintances seem to have of stealing from your rest doubly needful for you, as of necessity it must be broken. I know you to have a strong will of your own whenever you think fit to exercise it; there-fore exert it in this matter, and let not those virtues you possess of generosity, &c., work to your own ruin of health and life. Now is the time, dearest, begin gradually and it will be effectual, and they are no friends to you who will try to thwart your good purpose, with-draw at a reasonable hour, and they will soon understand that it is not your pleasure to sit up; and as to the world, 'Honi soit qui mally pense'. It would not trouble me; but of course, dear, you with me will look on this as it is a day dream, though.
    "P.S.—You seldom or ever comment on any part of my letters, is it too much that you should tell me whether you appreciate the warmth of my heart towards you?
    "The truth of my heart be its source, and it is given, more, perhaps, that you may feel how ready I am at all times to serve you. Farewell my own darling doctor."
    Examination continued.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Did you ever tell the de-fendant that you were charged with elec-tricity, and that he was the only one who could take it out of you?
    Witness.—I never did. I might have men-tioned to him that I had been told I was fully charged with electricity.
    At this stage there was an adjournment for half-an-hour. On leaving the court Mrs. Clarson was seized with an hysterical attack, from which, however, she recovered in a few minutes. On the Court resuming, the exa-mination was continued.
    Witness.—I sent the following letter to Mrs. Blair, mother of defendant:—

    "Melbourne, 27th May, 1867.
    "Madam,—Although the purport of the accompanying must, I know, but wound the heart of any mother, especially that of the good woman I have heard you to be, nevertheless, as I deem it the means whereby to reach the heart of your evil disposed son, Mr. John Blair, surgeon, Collins-street east, Melbourne, whose fate it has been to cross my path for the last eight years, I make the attempt. It may be that a word from a mother, though past your jurisdiction, may direct his mind to contemplate with some degree of shame the curse he has brought on at least one of the happiest of married couples through the loose and evil propensities of his nature, aided by the cloak his profession allows, and his professed return of friendship for me.
    "In times of confidence he has told me of your care of his youth, and how anxiously you gave him in charge to some gentleman (I think at college), who abused the trust you placed in him, who, instead of guarding him from evil, trained him in it, and his nature has been so far from refinement and dutiful recollections as to express to me some pleasure or amusement in your having been so deceived in your good and anxious care for his morality. The two enclosed are my husband's and my own last letters to him, and the details of our inter-course will reach you in pamphlet form, I doubt not.
    "Respectfully yours, "CAROLINE CLARSON. "To Mrs. John Blair, sen."

    Mr. IRELAND.—What was your object in writing to the old lady, Mrs. Blair?
    Witness.—Because I trusted her home influence would work on the doctor's mind, that he might feel and show how wrongly he had acted.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Then you wished to work a kind of mental conversion with him?
    Witness.—Why not ? That was my object. I did not send the letter open through the post. [A letter was handed to witness, consisting of several small leaves of foolscap, pinned together, another leaf containing the address and the postmark.] I sent this letter, but it is not the one I mean. I suppose I sent it open. I did not remember that. I sent it that way to be sure that the contents reached the mother.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Could she not have opened it?
    Witness.—She might have returned it unopened, as she knew my handwriting. I had written to her before this.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Why did you send this letter?
    Witness.—To show all the truth with respect to his character.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Then it was not with the view to reclaim him.
    Witness.—No.
    Mr. IRELAND,—To punish him.
    Witness.—To show his mother that I knew I spoke the truth.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Then you thought that she would not believe it at first.
    Witness.—I don't know. I wished to show I had additional proofs.
    Mr. IRELAND.—And this was the "emblem of brightness," the "dear doctor," the man in whose welfare you took so much interest, that you, a married woman, wished to become his housekeeper.
    Witness.—My husband was to live with us.
    Mr. Blair knew that.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You were to go there to take care of Blair, and your husband to take care of you.
    Witness.—I did not say that.
    Mr. IRELAND.—If you had not been a married woman, you would not have con-sidered it a degradation to serve him?
    After a long pause the witness said, "I cannot remember my feeling at the time. After the reconciliation of March, 1864, I was satisfied with him. He promised not to repeat his misconduct He did, however, repeat it in June, 1864. You know I made visits to him after that, and measured his bed for a set of blue curtains. Mr. Clarson did not know of this measuring. I was on amicable terms with defendant then. I wished to forget all that had occurred for the sake of all parties concerned. I first knew that he was going to be married September, 1866.
    Mr. IRELAND.—What caused your sudden revulsion of feeling with regard to him ?
    Witness.—On account of his fiendish con-duct in telling mutual friends that I asso-ciated with a woman of bad character.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Was that the whole cause? Witness.—I don't say it was the whole cause. I had told him of my acquaintance with this woman, and he knew I did not know she was a bad character.
    Mr. IRELAND.—But what did he do to cause this terrible outburst, raking up transactions as far back as 1863.
    Witness.—I told him his conduct was most insulting, about not defending me when Mrs. Wimble spoke of that woman. I sent no letters to his patients as such. I sent nine letters altogether, in consequence of Miss Hunter going to a pubic meeting and saying that a certain lady who was a bad character was introduced by me. She was Mrs. Blair then. Sent the letter produced, May 1868, to Mrs. Blair, 12 months after her marriage.
    "Two reasons give me especial gratification in your marriage, though not one vexes me ; the first is, believing with my whole heart that the pure, chaste man who married you was forced to, chiefly through me (it is said through some other lady), but that I think only a possibility ; my second reason, that henceforth you shall be my medium of com-munication to him, so I am at least one remove from the relation of a correspondent of his.
    "I desire now that you inform him that I have so much faith in the reports of his immoral life that I deem it a degradation that he should signally recognise me at any time. I look upon it as a tacit insult to me, and after this if continued, if I cannot give him in charge for such cowardice, I shall inform my husband, who doubtless will find means to teach him that it will not be allowed with impunity. Position!
    "The position of the wife of such a well-known character is so exalted that her silly simper can but be overwhelming.
    "If this has been the result of a late triumph, I will tell you what I have known of its foundation from the day following his exaltation.
    "On the evening of his readmission, the gentleman, that one in great haste—'Halloo !
    where are you off to in such haste?' 'I'm going to the Royal Society.' 'Oh, what's up there?'
    'Oh, Blair has been black-balled, and we are going to shove him in.'
    "How welcome are you to such a triumph, and all such, for it little matters to me how many care for him, so long as his character is known to them. The companionship of a king would only impress the writer.
    "May 4, 1868
    "The truth of the proverb, 'Birds of a feather flock together.' And the day will come when the judgment of God that shall stand.
    "May 6, 1868
    " 'The continued dropping of water weareth away stones.' Why is it asked that if certain letters clear from certain charges, why no trial? After a public charge has been entered against your husband, your spirits are bitter enough."
    Mr. IRELAND.—I thought his moral life was all condoned, and that you only complained of his not defending your character.
    Witness.—I had an opportunity after my separation from Mr. Blair of having many proofs of his being immoral which I did not previously know unless in my own case.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You thought it necessary to write all this to a woman only married 12 months?
    Witness.—She had ridiculed me.
    Mr. IRELAND.—And married him; and that accounts for the whole thing.
    Witness.—She had belied my character.
    Mr. IRELAND.—What did you mean by writing about the triumph ?
    Witness.—I thought Mr. Blair had no right in the Royal Society.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Because he married Miss Hunter?
    Witness.—False, false, false. I have a letter to deny that. (It appeared that this was one addressed by the witness to Mrs. Wimble.)
    Mr. IRELAND.—What king did you allude to?
    Witness.—An immoral king. Mr. IRELAND.—Supposing he was moral?
    Witness.—Then he would not care for his companionship. I meant that no matter how high his associations, I had that in my mind which knew he was not good.
    Mr. IRELAND.—And you consider that a proper letter?
    Witness.—Yes, under the circumstances.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You meant to wear her out? Witness.—Oh no, no, no. I never meant it. I was speaking the truth. I never spoke anything but the truth. I don't know how many letters I sent to Mrs. Blair, from a dozen to half a dozen. I did not know that the postman had orders not to deliver any of my letters.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Then, why did you have recourse to the milliner's boxes?
    Witness.—Because I would be certain the letters would meet her eye. I don't know they were sent away, nor that the servant had orders not to take my letters. I resorted to the milliner's boxes because it was necessary to know the letters had not miscarried. I sent a letter in an envelope addressed "To the proprietor of the House, 101 Collins-street. Please to keep the enclosed clean, Will call again for orders."
    The letter was as follows :—
    "Mrs. John Blair,—For every known letter of mine to you sent to Mr. Clarson by you or yours I distribute open copies of the same, which doubtless will meet you or your coward husband where least expected, and if not their contents are with strangers. What your object? You may feel assured that all such moves on your part or Blair's will ever tend only to facilitate the keeping of my word, namely, the making known this truth, that John Blair, of Collins street, is a cowardly medical villain, and he dare not deny the truth honourably."
    [The witness explained that before the word "distribute" she had meant to insert "will."]
    Mr. IRELAND.—The words about calling for orders on the envelope are in print. What did you mean by them?
    Witness.—I associate nothing with them. I don't know what Mrs. Blair might associate with them.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You wrote this letter to Mrs. Blair:—
    "Richmond-park, August, 1869.
    "This my answer to your defiance of me intimated by your gesture on the night of the Governor's ball, July 14, 1869. You pat him in public, but quarrel in private."— How do you know that?
    Witness.—I don't know it. I would not have written the letter if she had not made the gesture. This requires explanation. We had met at the supper-table. In their party were Mr. and Mrs. Blair, two other medical gentlemen, and two ladies. As soon as Mrs. Blair caught my eye, she turned round and patted him on the shoulder. (Roars of laughter.)
    Mr. IRELAND.—That vexed you?
    Witness.—No.
    Mr. IRELAND.—It pleased you? Witness.—No.
    Mr. IRELAND.—I suppose it would have pleased you to see them quarrel. (Reading the letter.) "You know that you are not in private as the wife of that fellow as you are in public, though not at all times in public does he keep the curtain drawn. Witness especially his conduct to you at Taylor's chapel, and when intending with you to luncheon on the Galatea. Woman, you sold yourself to a sensual dishonourable liar in John Blair, to injure me who never injured you, except in being the means chiefly and intentionally of making you his wife." I think it was you were sold and not she. How did she injure you?
    Witness.—By saying I was acquainted with a bad character.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You mean by marrying him.
    Witness.—No, I don't. But as his wife she carried about stories that I was a bad cha-racter. She had opportunities of doing so as his wife. That was my only meaning. I complained not of the relationship, but of the consequences of it.
    Mr. IRELAND (continuing the letter.)—"My motive at first for your happiness—until I found so many proofs of his having no more love for you than he ever had for me. But now I know it to be your curse, though you may have become so, one with his base cha-racter, that you cannot feel you are in a degraded position. . . . . Is it no curse that a husband has not sufficient respect even for his wife (to say nothing of love) to keep from making a drunken beast of himself when from his home and wife? Opinion and taste may differ, certainly, but where is your influ-ence for good."—You were vexed because he had no more love for her than for you.
    Would it not be more correct to say "because he had more love ?"
    Witness.—No ; because I had not thought of it. I thought it necessary to write this letter in consequence of the circumstances by which I was surrounded.
    Mr. IRELAND (continuing the letter.)—"What an exceedingly complaisant set the fellow has met with, who, though he has dishonourably and cowardly betrayed the crimes, indiscre-tions, imprudences, and weakness of his friends and those near and dear to him, even after he married, and they know it, and they add to the above cowardice. Instance Mr. —— But does he dream that by continuing the society of Dr. Blair, who has betrayed ——'s criminality in saying that —— was a patient of his for that foul disease which ever must be a disgrace to man, especially if married?" That was a nice amiable letter to send to a young woman just after she was married.
    Witness.—Well, I was insulted everywhere I was met.
    Mr. IRELAND continued reading the letter of which the following are the principal re-maining extracts :—"My expressed thoughts would always be those—you are but the wife of a medical, cowardly villain, married to aid him in crushing one whom he has im-plored to forgive him an evil which, if ex-posed at that time, would have placed him upon the roads. . . In your dirty work as Blair's shield you are foiled, for I vowed, not in vain, that Blair should be known, and time will yet prove that the whole tenor of my life before and since Blair sought me for his patient, but gives the lie to you and yours in reference to my character; except it be in doing as your female set are doing, and for which chiefly you were married, namely, that of aiding the crimes of a medical villain in the person of John Blair, of Collins-street.

    "I know better, also, than to call gaieties happiness; nevertheless, I attend as the wife of one known as one of the world's most honourable of men, he having a true moral worth, which your husband has neither in soul or body, and I shall continue to go as it pleases me ; also my ever-acknowledged good husband is pleased to permit my indulging in such matters, therefore, when I meet you, where you are only too glad of the opportunity to follow me, though you once told me that Blair looked but lightly upon women who attended balls, theatres, &c., know that one of my reasons is and was to defy you and yours.

    "Pray do not mistake me; when I vowed to make Blair known I did not vow that it would make his 'female' 'set' hate his character; although when among his like sensual villains, he says, 'that all women are —— at heart,' such sayings will also make their way to an opposite class of men ; therefore I heard it legitimately. Doubtless, it would suit his taste better if more women were in practice, and not merely at heart, as he says.
    "Why would he never meet myself, his accuser, face to face, though challenged? Ask him why. "CAROLINE CLARSON."

    Witness.—The remark made in the letter is one that he made to me himself.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Are you not ashamed of yourself to have written such a letter to a young married woman?
    Witness.—No ; I am not, though I admit it does look unamiable.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You visited Mr. Blair after 1864, and you sent him presents notwithstand-ing all he had done to you ?
    Witness.—I don't deny it. The last aggression on me was September 17, 1864. His actions weighed greatly on my mind. I sent him a scarf-pin in 1866 as a birthday present. I sent him other presents.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Then this sudden burst of morality is attributable to his not defending you?
    Witness.—Yes; and my further knowledge of his character.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Is it not strange that a married woman, as you were, should have entered into a correspondence with him about his indecent familiarities ?
    Witness.—It may be.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You said that it was no source of care or concern to your husband that you had not any children. Why did you then go to the defendant to perform an operation ?
    Witness.—I changed my mind on the subject. Some things had preyed so much on me that I thought if I had a child it might have the effect of changing my thoughts into a different current.
    Mr. IRELAND.—And you went to the very man who had caused the feelings you refer to in order to turn them into a different channel?
    Witness.—I could not go to any other medical man. The very day my husband went to Sydney I went to the defendant to get the operation performed. I did not intend my husband to know of it at all. The defendant refused to perform the operation. I made no allusion to an indecent photograph when I wrote to the defendant's mother and sister, so far as I can recollect. I wrote to the defendant's sister about a month after the receipt of the letter containing the indecent photograph. I sent the following letter to the defendant's sister in Scotland :—
    "Melbourne, March 3, 1868.
    "Miss Blair,—Madame,—In pity I spare your mother. You can say or withhold from her. Your brother, J. Blair, having heard from you I suppose of my saying I would communicate further with you by a pamphlet, has insolently written to my husband for 'fifteen copies.' I do not know whether you are of the same class with him, who can joke about such vileness, but he has an answer he dare not reply to. One reason for having promised you a pamphlet was that I never supposed he would have allowed his name to be handled or used as he knows we have, and still do with impunity; and surely the fact tells its own tale. Having determined in my mind to thwart his aim in making his wife my enemy, so as to silence me among his friends, which was so unnecessary; but as himself is the loser, and society will gradually be benefited and myself less disgraced by our breach, than if still. I was hiding the evil I know of him in my mind. I have no cause but to rejoice, as surely any one must see, especially when I am able to state the following :—Since I last wrote to you I have been informed by a lady, once a friend of your brother's, whose husband knows the gentleman of whom I write this next. He is a commercial traveller, whose wife, it is reported, your brother visits dur-ing her husband's travels. The nature of those visits may be judged by that husband feeling obliged to give up his situation, so as to be near his home to pre-vent such visits in future. The wife has since died, and the gentleman became a neighbour to the friend who told me, he having remarried. In Victoria we have had a general election for the Government and I have been told that at a certain committee meeting, where a friend of Blair's who is well known [Here the letter proceeded to make some statements which we omit]. This person put up for a district, and the popular party, taking into consideration his immorality, thought fit to advertise his private life by skits or bills, and posting them about. The person I allude to has a partner, also a friend of your brother's. This partner being annoyed by seeing those bills put up where he lives, did his best to pull them down, which caused a fracas, and eventually he was hurled into a gutter—so we heard—and was told 'to go home, for he would find enough to attend to there without interfering with preventing the exposure of his partner.' We also heard that previously in a committee meeting the same gentleman was trying to prevent the speaking of an elector, when he was told that if he did not desist, that this man, a neigh-bour of his, would 'talk to him about his domestic trouble,' which arises from his wife being a favourite patient of Blair's, it seems, and it is said that in her husband's absence your brother has spent hours with her, and whether she deserves it or not it is said that she is looked on by some in the village as a mistress of your brother's. For my own part, I can declare that he to my own knowledge has had strange manœuvrings in connexion with her of which her husband now knows, and since your brother told me that she told him secrets she would not tell to her husband, I have reckoned her among those women who have encouraged him in the evil practices in which he tried to initiate me, and, as it was, was so great a curse to me, and from which I saved him from a just punishment, to the risk of all evil imputa-tions, and I scorned her in my heart accord-ingly, and I told your brother so. This day one of the editors of The Argus was giving a list of subscribers to the Colonial Monthly. Dr. Blair was down. My husband exclaimed, 'What is this ? I shall not send that fellow one.' The gentleman replied, 'It is meant for David Blair, the late member of Parliament. What, did you think it was that man with the big house in Collins-street?' My husband said 'Yes.' The editor replied, 'Why I threatened that wretch with seven years on the roads, but he came to me and made all the acknowledgments he could, and so it passed. From what we have heard of him these last 14 months, his conduct is hated in more quarters than one, and I suppose you must know that however much I may have reason for hating him, to concoct and write or speak such things I dare not.
    "C. CLARSON." "Miss Blair."
    Cross-examination continued.—I know Mrs. Friend. I do not produce the original of a letter dated June 28, 1867, purporting to be written by Mr. Friend to my husband. The letter is signed Christopher S. Friend. I know Mr. Friend's signature. He is now dead. The paper produced, signed Christr. S. Friend, was signed by him ; but believe I have seen him write his name in full—Christo-pher. The letter of the 28th June was published in the pamphlet issued by my husband. In the letter Mr. Friend stated that he and a friend of his, whom he had consulted, agreed that from the statements he had heard, there was "no case;" that the law afforded no relief, and that it would be madness for us to thrust ourselves into an action which, so far as expense was con-cerned, would be, ruinous. In the same letter Mr. Friend referred to the defendant as "a fiend in human form." On July 27, 1867, a month after the receipt of Mr. Friend's letter, I wrote to Mrs. Friend. I then told her that my husband told me I had to thank the untruthful and dishonourable interference of a lady—to whom at his request I had told the main facts of the story—for Mr. Friend's unjust condemnation of me. I did not see Mr. Friend's letter of June 28. I attribute the change in his views to the fact that this lady put a vile construction upon what I had told her had been the effect on me of the defendant's aggressions, and that she had communicated this to Mr. Friend, who had thus acquired a false impression. I sent the following letter to Mrs. Friend:—
    "Feb. 27, 1867.
    4 Wellington-terrace, East Melbourne.
    "Dear Mrs. Friend,—Mr. Clarson tells me that your judgment has gone out against me on your reading my case as written, and that in your opinion I may say what I please, I am not morally innocent. For your own sake, as well as those near and dear to you, may you be spared my just judgment in any similar case on their behalf. Your girls are born to you, but you know not how much the same God may permit them to be tried. Even the opinion of him who has been permitted to be so great a curse to me and mine, has often been expressed to me as to my being a very virtuous woman— as having virtue worthy of his mother or wife. Not that I judge myself on such opinion, for I know who has to do with the heart, and He knows wherein I have done wrong. But it was not in my admiration of a character I thought resembled my husband's, who I have over felt to be at the pinnacle of human virtue, or for improving a friendship with such an one, for my husband's sake as well as my own, for I never wished for it but for him to share it with me at all times ; for, after a length of three years' silent admiration, enhanced by the personal proofs of his delicate and sympa-thising conduct during my times of sickness, with the gratitude I felt for his skill in my business. For these things I stand not guilty before God, or for after so long an acquaintance having opportunities, through a mere accident, of accepting more direct friendship, and then, after further proof of his conduct, that I should lay before him, as the man of honour I thought him, how much I had ever thought of him, so that he might never mistake any warmth of attachment for wrong feeling. For these things neither would the angels in Heaven accuse me of evil, or their God. Neither did that man misjudge me, for he could not ; for in the same letter did I do honour to my husband, by expressing my great appreciation of his virtue ; therefore could he not, as that evil-construing Mrs. S—— said, 'take it into his brain that I wanted it for evil purposes.' May God forgive her, for I won't.
    "You, I hear, have said that you knew I was very fond of him. I was greatly attached, neither did I hide I was so even from my husband, because it was of a nature that did not interfere with my relative position with him, in my mind till several years after, or after indeed his third aggression, though upon the first appearance of his evil propensi-ties he interfered with my happiness ; but his third aggression being of a grosser order, that evil did make my nature shrink and revolt from nature herself, and I did hate not my husband, but the being a wife, and at times could I but have hid myself from both them without wronging either, how willingly would I, God knows . . . . . Had that attachment been of an evil nature, how could I have found the pleasure I always did of taking every opportunity to introduce Mr. Blair to my friends of both sexes, and how could I ever have loved to accept the friendship of her who is now his wife, myself being the means of her being so, even, however, from first to almost the last endeavouring to bring them together in spite of all he had said against her as an imprudent woman years ago, and which I never once named to her till there could be no doubt left in my mind? That slight obligation, the use of his carriage when you were ill here, for when quarrelling with me he would be mean enough to trace it to me.
    "I am glad also that my determination has been fulfilled, in that he has been forced to speak of your daughters as I think they merit, viz., the well-educated daughters of a gentle-man, and not mere bush girls, not worthy of a seat in a carriage, though I begged hard for him to show such kindness to them instead of fulfilling his many broken promises to me which I never cared to accept alone ; but I am avenged of all that in your kindness to him at Burnham Lodge. It was Mr. C.'s desire that I should not write to any one again at Geelong; but I could not say farewell to you all in my mind without speaking out of my heart. As to our future I may say nothing. I shall not think of leaving Melbourne of all things for I am ready and willing to face that friend before few or many, and my husband has promised me that if he has to proclaim his character himself in the streets, he shall not escape unless I desire it, and for myself I would rather be looked upon as an actual adultress than that his treachery should not be known ; and this is all have to say, except that I think it right to enclose the following copy, sent, as you see ; and I cannot think that this letter was shown to Mr. Friend on his visit there previous to his last seeing Mr. Clarson, or no matter how they might have presumed to interfere with me. Surely, Mr. F. would not have encouraged anything so dishonour-able as their thus opposing Mr. C. Surely he was capable of taking the consequences of what he deemed a proper withholding."
    Cross-examination continued.—I don't think I saw Mr. Friend's letter. I took my observation about unjust condemnation from Mrs. Friend's remarks. I heard that Mr. Friend had condemned me. He was an elderly gentleman, and a man of business. I can't say whether he used to sign his letters uniformly. I have seen some signed "yours affectionately."
    Mr. IRELAND.—That seems to have been your own practice.
    The cross examination was then directed to the photographs. Neither of the two alleged libellous photographs had as yet been put in evidence, and Mr. Ireland was therefore obliged to confine his questions to the one which was put in.
    Witness.—This photograph was taken on a vacant piece of ground at Wellington-parade. My dress was coloured pink, and it turned out white in the photograph. I had the one produced coloured pink as you now see it. I had only two or three copies taken. I never saw the indelicate photograph till after the action by Mr. Blair was stopped. I was then putting aside the law papers connected with the case, and looking over them I saw this photograph and looked at it.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You have made reference to God, you have talked of virtue, and de-nounced evil, and yet all these long years, till Mr. Blair was going to be married, you suppressed the knowledge that he took these liberties with you ?
    Witness.—That is the wrong that l have done. Mr. IRELAND.—And you persisted in going to his house from 1863 to 1867 ?
    Witness.—Yes ; I was still his patient.
    Mr. IRELAND.—And you were willing to do duty as his housekeeper ?
    Witness.—I merely meant a friendly act as God is my witness.
    MR. IRELAND.—You were willing to go as housekeeper to a man who had three times behaved most indecently to you.
    Witness.—Not as housekeeper—oh no, no, no; but to live with my husband.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You talk about being "differently circumstanced ;" that means not married.
    Witness.—No ; it was this. Mr. Clarson had spoken to me on the subject of our living with Mr. Blair, in consequence of his having removed to a large house in Collins-street, and we could have a portion of it.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Then you did not mean if Mr. Clarson was out of the way.
    Witness.—No; I had no such idea.
    Mr. IRELAND.—That will do, madam.
    Re-examined by Mr. DUNNE.—I understood that Mr. Clarson and Mr. Blair had spoken about our having a portion of his house. In the letter alluded to the words "remain as you are," means while he remained unmarried —till he got a wife. We were then living at Evans place, and had a house of our own ; but if proper arrangements were made we might have gone to live with Mr. Blair.
    Mr. DUNNE.—In reference to Mr. Friend's letter, was it not the fact that in the interval between his letter to your husband and yours to his wife, Mr. Friend had come to Melbourne, and stopped with a certain lady ?
    Witness.—He did, and she must have given him information against me. It was in con-sequence of that I wrote the letter. Mr. Blair used to keep all the presents I sent to him. They were mostly taken to him by my hus-band. Blair never knew except once but that my husband knew of all. Blair never refused to take my presents. He only spoke of the trouble to me. After January, 1867, Mr. Blair never met me but he insulted me. On one occasion when I was in a car on the Richmond road, the day after he was admitted to the Royal Society, he met in his buggy. As he passed he laughed at me, and shook his whip thus. (The witness, to the great amuse-ment of the Court. energetically gave an illustration of the defendant's manner.) On another occasion I was going in a car to Mr. Taylor's chapel. Passed Mr. Blair with two ladies in Collins-street, one his wife; he put up his umbrella, laughed, and pointed at me so (giving another illustration). He attended the same place of worship as I did that day. (Laughter.) On another occasion, when I was on the back of a car, he and his wife passed ; he took off his hat, and bowed himself almost to the ground, so (illustrating it). Mrs. Blair used to behave in almost the manner except that she did not take off her hat and use the whip. Once when passing Little Bourke-street I came suddenly on Miss Hunter, who had a young lady with her. As she passed me, she touched the lady and said, "Pretty, is she-not?" (Laughter.) She had no right to make any such remark. Mr. Blair's letter of December 28, 1865, for the first time mentions marriage.
    At this stage, at the earnest request of the counsel, the further hearing of the case was adjourned till next day.24
  • 9 Mar 1872, also http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article20497987725
  • 9 Mar 1872, THE GREAT SCANDAL CASE. CLARSON v. BLAIR.
    FOURTH DAY — Saturday, 2nd March. This case was continued on Saturday in the Supreme Court before Mr. Justice Barry and a special jury of twelve. The direct examination of the defendant, John Blair, was resumed. He said :— I do not recollect receiving a letter from Mrs. Clarson telling me of what she had suffered through the past, but that my secret would die with her. As I said before, I destroyed a great many of her letters without reading them. The conversation she alluded to with reference to my carrying my in-struments with me I never had with her, and I never made the reply she said I did. I remember on one occasion, when I visited her professionally, she asked me if I had come to perform the opera-tion, so that she might have children. I put the ques-tion off as well as I could, the same as I always did when she talked to me on the subject. Our friendly intercourse continued until November, 1866, but previous to that she was getting more troublesome in her calls, and was continually making arrangements for my going out on shoot ing excursions with her husband. Mr. Clarson used to borrow money from me for a few days when he was short, to carry on his business with. He always used to pay it back, but one day I refused to let him have any more, thinking by this means to get rid of Mrs. Clarson's visits, which were getting too frequent and annoying. She was in the habit, when I was out, of calling at my house, going upstairs and playing the piano. She wanted to send me a piano, but I refused, and said she would like to oome to live at my house. I looked upon the proposition as pre posterous. I could not shake her off in a quiet gentlemanly manner. I always like to be kind to excitable people. She once sent me a massive silver cigar-case that was too heavy to carry in the pocket. My name and crest was engraved upon it. I said to her, "You must give up snding me these presents," and in a letter to me she asked, " Why deprive me of the only pleasure of my life ?" I was at a loss how to throw her off in a gentle way. I told her how wrong it was of her to do this without her husband's know ledge, and that I knew he could not afford it. I told her once I would not receive her presents any longer, and she got into one of her excitable moods, and it was wishing to calm a woman of her disposition that I wrote the letter to her dated 28th December, 1865, in which I told her I thought of getting married. I told her this wishing to divert her thoughts. One day when I was out she decorated my bed in a most peculiar manner. The last time I saw her in a friendly way was in January, 1867. I had been in the country, and on returning home I found two letters from her, and a third little note with "come immediately" on it. I went to her place, and she entered the room in a very excited state, saying, "Why did you not come before? Is this the way you treat your patients?" I said, Madam, provide yourself with another medical man," and left the house. I never insulted her, as she says I did. I was subjected to a species of torture by her. She sent shameful letters to my patients, and they complained to me of it. She sent letters by hundreds to my patients. I got married in April, 1867, and my wife, who had previously been Miss Hunter, got a most dis graceful letter from Mrs. Clarson. If I met Mrs. Clarson in the street she would stare at me with a grin of satisfaction, and if I went to a ball with my wife she would be sure in some way to get an in troduction. She used to ring at my bell, and throw letters into the hall. It is not true that I was blackballed by the Royal Society ; I was unanimously elected. What she construes into my shaking my whip at her was the simple act pf politeness of raising my whip to my hat. I remember pointing at her once, but it was not in an insulting way. I was going to chapel with my wife and another lady, to whom I merely pointed out Mrs. Clarson as the person who wrote the letters. I remember being at the Governor's hall. Mrs. Clarson there planted herself before my wife and myself, and kissed. I remember her sending a letter to the subscribers of the Alfred Hospital. I remember picking up a portrait of Mrs. Clarson at Mrs. Wimble's. I got one copied. I forwarded the copy to Mr. Clarson, with some extracts of Mrs. Clarson's pasted on it, and a note (produced). The word "copied" on it is in my handwriting. The envelope produced is not the one in which I sent it, and the writing on it is not mine. My wife was present when I wrote the note, and when I put the photograph in the envelope I gave it to my groom to post. I also showed her the pieces I tore off Mrs. Clar son's letter. The photograph is not in the same condition as when I sent it. It has been muti lated in a most filthy manner. The reason I sent the photograph to Mr. Clarson with pieces cut from his wife's letters was to let him know what a foolish woman she was. I did not send this medical picture to Mrs. Clarson. The writing on the picture, " Mrs. Clarson as seen by Dr. B.," is not mine. The writing on the envelope is not mine. I never on any occasion sent an indecent picture to either Mr. or Mrs. Clarson, neither did I know of anyone else sending any.
    Cross-examined by Mr. Billing : I got the por trait I picked up at Mrs. Wimble's copied because I wanted to keep the original. I wanted to keep the original, because my friends kept asking me what was all the commotion about this woman, and when they chaffed me I showed them the likeness, and said " This is the woman." I only got one copy made, as that was to send to Mr. Clarson, so that he should control her foolish actions. I did not get the envelope addressed by anybody else. I did not disguise my hand writing. I had no reason to do so. I do not know the handwriting of the superscription on this envelope. The writing on the other is not mine either. I don't know whose it is. I swear that, I never saw it before until I saw it on the table in this court. I certainly did once put my hand underneath Mrs. Clarson's clothes, but it was not with any indecent intention. She had a fainting fit, and was much worse than usual, and thinking it might hare been caused by tight-lacing, because I felt that her waist was compressed, I put my hands under her clothes to ascertain. Q. : Did you think it a decent thing to do A. : There was nothing indecent in it under the circumstances. She appeared tightly drawn in, and had difficulty in breathing. But could you not have ascertained whether she was tight-laced in any other way ? A: No, not under the circumstances. It would have taken too long a time to unhook her dress. Q.: Does every medical man put his hand under a patient's clothes in the manner you did to see whether she be tightly laced ? A. : Yes, in such an emergency. Q : But this was not an emergency, you know. A. : It would have been one had she died in my room. It is a frequent thing for people to die in such fits, and Mrs. Clarson was on this occasion worse than usual, and it was my duty to take prompt measures. I swear I did not press her to my breast, and she had no occasion to say "don't" or push away my hand. She did not do either. I did not say " I want to excite you, so that you won t go off again." It is just by the merest chance that l kept the letters I have produced in this case. They were not kept for any purpose. I have destroyed and thrown into the waste-paper basket many of a more poetical character. I never read any letter from her complaining of what she calls my aggressions. Q.: Did you, as a medical man, think it right never to acquaint Mr. Clarson with your receiving these letters ? A. : Yes. I will explain that. A medical man is not in the position to make strife between man and wife. If he has got a hysterical patient his object is to relieve her as much as possible. I did not draw her between my knees on the occasion of my examining her breast. She did not then say to me that her husband's goodness inclined her to tell him all. I think I only met Miss Hunter once at the Clarsons. She had an antipathy to go to the place. I have read the pamphlet called "Truth, not Libel" I did not bring an action against Mr. Clarson on reading that. To Mr. Higinbotham : I swear Mrs. Clarson never remonstrated with me for what she calls my agressions. To a juryman : I was twenty-six or twenty-seven years old when I first commenced to attend Mrs. Clarson.
    Elizabeth Layers deposed that she was Dr. Blair's housekeeper from 1861 to 1864, and that during that period Mrs. Clarson used frequently to come to the house, sometimes twice a day, and bring flowers and fruits with her, and that if Dr. Blair was not in she would either wait or write a note to him ; also that she fainted occasionally while she was there.
    Mary Taylor said : I was in the employ of Dr. Blair, as housemaid, for about twelve months after he entered the house in Collins street. Mrs. Clarson frequently came there, and the doctor often told me to say he was out to her when he would be in. Sometimes when he was out she would go all through the house, and into his bed room, and wash her hands, and play the piano in the drawing room. I remember one day in March, 1865, she came in while the doctor was out, and went up into his bedroom and decorated his bed with blue crape curtains, blue tassels, and bows. She also decorated the dressing-table and looking-glass with flowers and ribbons of all colours. I called up my sister, who was the housekeeper, because I thought the woman was cracked.
    Mrs. Blair was next called. She was deeply affected, and for some time was unable to give her evidence. As soon as she had recovered a little she said : — My name is Mary Blair. I am the wife of Dr. Blair, the defendant. I have known him since I was five years old. I met him at the house of the Carsons not more than twice or three times. In December, 1867, I saw Dr. Blair write the letter produced, and place it in an envelope, with a photograph of Mrs. Clarson. The photograph was not sent from our house in the condition it is now. I saw him give it to the groom to post. While my husband was writing the note I had the photograph in my hand. It was not pos sible for it to be in its present state without my seeing it. I have known Mrs. Clarson slightly for seven or eight years. I remember the Go vernor's ball. The first time I observed her in the room she was following me about. I tried to get away from her as far as l could. I managed to keep out of her way until we got to the supper-table, when she made her way up and eat opposite to my husband and I. She commenced at once to make herself very disagreeable by making faces at me, and Mr. Clarson shook his hand across the table at my husband, and said something about making known his conduct. I told the doctor to take no notice of them, and Mrs. Clarson made a hissing noise. I then patted my husband on the shoulder. I did not do it out of any malicious feeling to Mrs. Clarson. I did say to another lady once, when we met Mrs. Clarson in the street, " Isn't she a beauty ?" One day, I believe I had received an invitation to spend the day with Mrs. Clarson. I did not go, but went for a drive with the doctor. On our return we called at Mrs. Clarson's house. She was not in, and we then went on to the doctor's place, as he wanted to call in to make some inquiries before he drove me home. When he opened the door he said, "Here's Mrs. Clar son" and he asked me to come in. I went in, and Mrs. Claraon was in the surgery. Directly she saw me she said, "You never answered my note ; it was very unladylike of you." She spoke very excitedly, and I was angry with her. I said, " Well it may be, but I do not intend to answer any of your letters, and if you think I am going to stand your nonsense you are mistaken." The doctor said he hoped there would be no quarrel ; and I said, " No." Mrs. Clarson then went away, and the doctor drove me home. There is no truth in the statement made by Mrs. Clarson that I once introduced myself into the house of Dr. Blair with a latch-key, and spent the evening with him. It is as false as her other statements. she tries at any place of public amusement to get as near me as possible, and that hurts my feelings after all the persecution my husband and I have undergone at her hands. I received a number of letters from her, but never would read them, or allow her to interfere with my peace of mind or my affection for my husband, so that I can scarcely say what was in her letters. To Mr. Billing : I am sure I did not do any thing at the Governor's Ball to cause Mrs. Clarson to do what she did. I saw my husband put the photograph of Mrs. Claraon into the envelope. It was not then in the same disgraceful state at is now. It was a simple copy of the carte he got at Mrs. Wimble's. I had the photograph in my hands before he enclosed it. I am sure it was not torn in any way. I did not see the word "copied" on it. I see it now, and think it is my husband's writing. I left the room for a minute or so while he was writing the note, but it was impossible for the photograph to have been altered to its present state without my knowing it, as I saw him put it in the envelope. Both my husband and myself would scorn to do such a disgraceful thing. The envelope produced is not the same. The writing is not my husband's. This closed the evidence for the defence, and the Court then adjourned until Monday.
    FIFTH DAY—Monday, 4th March. On the fifth day the court was occupied with Mr. Ireland's address to the jury for the defence, and Mr. Billing's rejoinder. His Honour the Judge then summed up, and the jury having retired, returned into court after an absence of an hour and a quarter with a verdict for the defendant on all the counts of the declaration. There was some applause by the public, and Dr. Blair was surrounded by his friends, who congratulated him upon the result of the trial.26
  • 27 Jun 1874, An unruly coachman appeared before the City Bench yesterday John Houlihan, coachman to Dr Blair was charged with insulting behaviour and wilfully damaging property. In consequence of Houlihan absenting himself from duty Dr Blair summoned him to the District Police Court where on Thursday the Bench discharged him from the doctors service and directed that 30s should be deducted from his wages. The same evening Houlihan influenced with drink went to the house of Dr Blair demanded to be paid but could not state what amount was due and behaved in a very violent manner battering in the dining room door and breaking some picture frames. Some medical friends of the doctor happened to come in and they did their best to keep Houlihan from doing harm while Dr Blair brought a constable who locked the man up. Houlihan was fined £10 with £5 damages or three months imprisonment with hard labour.27
  • 16 Feb 1875, BURNT TO DEATH. TO THE EDITOR OF THE ARGUS.
    Sir,—Scarcely a week elapses without the occurrence of some tragic event or sudden death from burning, often originating through the inflammable nature of ladies' attire. Only the other day a young lady in the bloom of health was enveloped in flames and scorched to death through the instantaneous ignition of her muslin dress, and in your issue of this morning another sad case is recorded. In a semi-tropical climate like ours, where muslin, lace, and all descriptions of light stuffs must necessarily constitute a leading constituent in the composition of female attire, it is worth while knowing that these inflammable fabrics may be rendered fire-proof by steeping them in starch mixed with half its weight of carbonate of lime.
    In the Edinburgh Medical Journal of January, 1862, my attention was directed to this, and on referring to that journal of that date I find it mentioned, under the head of "Non-inflammable Fabrics,"—"In these days of inflammable ladies we shall, perhaps, render good service by giving publicity to the discovery recently made by a French chemist that muslin, lace, &c., may be rendered fire-proof by steeping them in starch mixed with half its weight of carbonate of lime."—
    I have, &c.,
    JOHN BLAIR, M.B., F.R.C.S.,
    Surgeon to the Alfred Hospital.
    101 Collins-street east, Feb. 15.28
  • 27 Apr 1875, PLANTING THE STREETS WITH TREES. TO THE EDITOR OF THE ARGUS.
    Sir,—In yesterday's issue you forcibly draw attention to the necessity of ornamenting some streets by planting trees at the sides of the road. Considering the unusual width of our streets, and how much in need of shade we are in summer, it is surprising how little has been done in this kind of ornamentation considering the advantages which we as citizens would derive from arboricultural extension. But when private efforts are made with a view of endeavouring to stimulate the city corporation in this direction, they are informed that something is going to be done, as you justly state, or "it is under consideration," &c.
    It is now two years since I addressed a letter to the mayor asking permission to plant. A copy of the letter I append, together with the town clerk's reply—That the corporation have given attention to the representations and while they coincide in the advantages of tree growing, they have not decided on the plan and the localities &c."
    Trees do not grow in a day. Two years have passed away, and I suppose the council is still undecided.—I am, Sir, yours &c.
    JOHN BLAIR, M.B.,F.R.C.S., Ed. 101 Collins street east, April 22.
    101 Collins street East, April 29, 1873.
    The Right Worshipful the Mayor of Melbourne.
    Sir,—I am desirous of planting trees in front of my residence in Collins-street east, conforming, of course, to space &c, allotted for that purpose, and I apply to you as mayor for permission to carry the same into effect. It must be obvious to you Sir, and every thinking man or woman in this city, what a boon it would confer upon the public at large to have a row of trees lining some of our streets. The houses would be shaded, the pavement would not become so hot, the reflection and glare of the windows would be materially lessened ; when the trees acquired sufficient height less evaporation would take place from the road, consequently, dust would be more under control, and the watering of the streets would not require to be performed so frequently, thereby causing a great saving to the corporation in labour, besides a saving of Yan Yean, which is becoming every year a greater object, from the increased reticulation of pipes necesaary for the supply ot the rapidly increasing suburbs. The great absorbing and radiating power of our pavements and unsheltered buildings during the hot months is greatly overlooked by the masses of our citizens, who swelter in consequence. If you, sir, could only impress them with the fact that a naked stone building exposed to the piercing rays of the summer sun has been known to have a temperature of 118deg. Fahr, while an adjacent building, sheltered by a few trees and fanned with the foliage on a hot wind day, had a temperature of 86deg. Fahr.
    By the more general planting of trees the city would be greatly beautified, the damp parts of it would become drier, from the roots absorbing the superfluous moisture and the health, comfort, and well-being of the inhabitants would be vastly promoted. As the present is now the proper time for planting, I trust as early a reply us possible will be forwarded to this communication.—I have the honour to be, sir, your most obedient servant, JOHN BLAIR, M.B., F.R.C.S., Ed., Surgeon to the Alfred Hospital.
    Town hall Melbourne, 13th May, 1873
    Sir,-I have the honour to inform you that your letter of the 30th ult., desiring permission to plant trees in front of your residence in Collins street, and pointing out the advantages likely to result from the growing of umbrageous trees at the street sides in the city, was duly laid before the council of the city of Melbourne on the 5th inst., and was by the council referred to the Public Works Committee for special consideration.
    I am further to inform you that the committee have given attention to the representations which your letter contains, and coincide with you in opinion as to the advanttages of tree growing in certain streets and with special arrangements ; but that until a general plan as to localities and conditions shall have been decided upon, the committee think it inexpedient to permit any further merely isolated plantations in the streets.—
    I have the honour to be, sir, your obedient servant, E.G. FITZGIBBON, Town clerk.
    [To] John Blair. Esq., M.D., 101 Collins-st E.29
  • 10 Dec 1879, A NEW DEODORISER. By incitation a number of the leading residents of Ballarat and others including Dr Holthouse (health officer), Dr Blair (Alfred Hospital, Melbourne), Dr Bunce, Sergeant Carden, and several of the city councillors, attended at Mr Roxburgh’s office, Mair street, on Tuesday morning to witness some experiments made by Mr A. D. Hunter of a new disinfecting, deodorising, and fertilising powder, which has received favorable notice in Melbourne and other towns in the colony. The first test made was with nightsoil, which was treated in various ways with Hunter's disinfectant, as also with Sullivan’s disinfectant. The second test was with some of the drainage from the Webster street drain, then some refuse from a soap factory, and last of all with some blood from one of the slaughteryards. Each experiment was performed by placing the material to be operated on in two buckets, and a small quantity of Hunter's compound being dusted over the contents of one bucket, while the same process was adopted by dusting the contents of the other bucket with Sullivan’s disinfectant. In every instance Hunter’s mixture gave the greatest satisfaction to those present, the general opinion being that the new deodoriser did its work more effectually, and left no smell behind. Several buckets of the material operated on were deposited away for the purpose of a further inspection to-day.
    Mr Hunter claims for his disinfectant that it absorbs the ammonia and retains it, while other deodorisers throw it off, thus rendering the material treated useless for purposes of manuring. Mr Hunter exhibited a block of manure, treated with his disinfectant and pressed in the form of a brick, while other portions were in a powdered state, and from the remarks made by several agricultural experts present, it will no doubt form a valuable assistant to the farmer and market gardener, the manure as treated, being quite free from the slightest smell, or in any way offensive. Mr Hunter also stated that when manure has been disinfected by means of his deodoriser it will have very beneficial effects both in promoting the growth and intensifying the colors of flowers, and as a valuable stimulant to fruit trees, especially the orange, during the long drought this country is subjected to.
    Dr Blair states that it is used in the Alfred Hospital, and proves a valuable assistant. We recommend the City Council to try its effect in a much more extensive form on the notorious Webster street drain, for if the stench arising from it, is anything like that from the sample tested on Monday, the sooner something is done the better. Mr Roxburgh, of Mair street, has been appointed the local agent, and will no doubt be pleased to give every information to persons interested in such matters.30
  • 23 Apr 1881, A complimentary farewell dinner was given on April 21, at Gunsler's Cafe, to Dr. J. Blair, who is about to leave the colony on a visit to England. Dr. Hardy was in the chair. The staff and committee of management of the Alfred Hospital, with a large number of me dical and other friends, were present, and a very pleasant evening spent.31
  • 5 Jun 1886, THE ALFRED HOSPITAL.
    The committee of management of the Alfred Hospital held their ordinary weekly meeting on Friday afternoon... It was further resolved that the secretary write to Dr. Blair, calling his attention to the fact " that he has not visited the institution for a period of four weeks, and requesting the reasons for his absence."32
  • 14 Jun 1886, Dr Blair wrote, in reply to the committee a letter of inquiry, that his absence from duty during the last week or two was caused by illness. The letter was received.33
  • 10 Mar 1887, Dr John Blair of 101 Collins-street east, died yesterday at his residence after a protracted illness in which the liver was principally affected. He was a native of Linlithgowshire Scotland and was 52 years of age. He studied his profession in Glasgow and Edinburgh becoming Licentiate of the Royal College of Surgeons of the latter city in 1857 and Fellow in 1874. He was also a doctor of medicine of the University of Sydney. He came to Victoria in 1859 and practised for some time at Northcote but after a while removed to Melbourne where with the exception of a visit to the old country a few years ago he has since resided. Soon after his arrival here he became connected with the Medical Society of Victoria of which he was honorary secretary for 10 years, when he was elected its president. In 1867 when the movement having for its object the foundation of a Prince Alfred Memorial was started, a project which eventually resolved itself into the Alfred Hospital, Dr Blair took a prominent part in promoting its accomplishment and on the completion of this charity in 1870, he was elected one of the honorary surgeons, an appointment he continued to hold up to the time of his death. In this institution he has always taken great interest and has published several pamphlets bearing upon hospital man agement. During the Premiership of Mr Service he was appointed a member of the Medical Board of Victoria. Dr Blair was also a connoisseur in pictures, and at one time painted a little himself. He leaves a widow but no children.34
  • 10 Mar 1887, A well known figure in the medical world of Melbourne passed away yesterday, Dr. John Blair, after an illness extending over five months, expired at his residence, Collins-street east, at 9 o'clock yesterday morning. Dr. Blair was intimately connected with the history of the colony, and arrived in Australia in the year 1858, when he at once commenced practice, and, what was more to the public good, became actively associated with the medical progress of the city. It does not need that those who have known Dr. Blair should go very far back in research for many beneficent deeds. Always taking a deep interest in his profession, he was able at various times to prove his interest in it by many acts which as a medical man he could not necessarily be called on to undertake. He held strong opinions on the subject of hospital management, and was, until his health gave way, one of the visiting officers of the Alfred Hospital, in which institution he always took a lively interest. Dr. Blair was a string advocate for the establishment of the system of "paying wards" or "provident hospitals" as he termed them ; and in a pamphlet which he wrote on paying hospitals he wrote with sarcastic emphasis on the "struggling poor" of the colonies, which he said was chiefly made up of well to do mechanics, domestic servants, laborers and others, who could all well afford to pay. Dr. Blair also took a great interest in the science of nursing, and among his other contributions to medical literature is an address to nurses, in which the nurse is not only exhorted to do her best, but was shown how to do it. The deceased gentleman was born at Bowness, Linlithgowshire, in 1835, and ran through his early medical and surgical training at Edinburgh and Glasgow. He was a doctor of medicine, and F.R.C.S.,Ed. For 10 years he was honorary secretary to the Medical Society of Victoria, and it is due to his memory to say that but for the active part he took in pushing on the Alfred Hospital that institution might not have been in existence.35
  • 10 Mar 1887, Dr. John Blair, the well-known Collins street medical practitioner, died at nine o'clock this morning, after a long illness. The deceased was one of the most distinguished men of his profession in Australia, and had been a" resident of Melbourne for thirty years. He had been connected with the Alfred Hospital since its foundation, and was the principal medical officer of that institution when he died.36
  • 11 Mar 1887, The funeral of the late Dr. Blair took place yesterday, and was attended by a very large number of representative citizens. The interment took place in the Melbourne General Cemetery. The pall bearers were:—Messrs. Archibald D. Hunter and H. J. Johnstone (brothers-in-law of the deceased), J. F. Anderson (secretary of the Alfred Hospital), N Wimble, J. Morris, W. Greenlaw, G Wragge, T Roxburgh, Thomas Loader, and Dr Figg. The Rev. Charles Strong officiated at the grave.37
  • 12 Mar 1887, THE ALFRED HOSPITAL
    It was unanimously resolved to forward a letter of condolence to Mrs John Blair on the death of her husband.
    The secretary was instructed to make arrangements for the appointment of an honorary medical officer to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Dr Blair.38
  • 12 Mar 1887, Dr. John Blair, who has been in a very low state of health for some time back, died Wednesday at his residence, Collins street east, and Melbourne lost one of its oldest and most highly respected medical men. Dr. Blair was kind to the poor and courteous to all, and be won for himself an enviable reputation amongst his brother practitioners, who respected alike his heart and his judgment. He has been ailing for the past lew months.39
  • 7 Apr 1887, The Supreme Court yesterday granted probate to the will of the late Dr John Blair. The amount of the property was stated to be £9,069, which has been left to his widow.40
  • 27 Sep 1887, INSOLVENT COURT. MONDAY, Sept. 26. (Before His Honour Judge Worthington.) RE ARCHIBALD D. HUNTER An adjourned examination sitting was held in the estate of A. D. Hunter, of Melbourne, merchant. Mr. Braham appeared for the assignee, and Mr. Bryant for the insolvent.
    A. D. Hunter, the insolvent, was further examined respecting his business transactions. He said that at sequestration he owed the Federal Bank £2,700 on account of an overdraft, which Fry and Co. had guaranteed ; that £2,700 was expended in the purchase of the properties at Gembrook, Geelong, und Ascotvale, in paying off an overdraft he had with the National Bank at Geelong, and in carrying on the Essendon brickworks. The Federal Bank held the properties he had mentioned as security at the time he become insolvent. He first became connected with the Mutual Live Stock Financial and Agency Co in July, 1883, as a shareholder of 100 £1 shares, and paid £15 in cash for them altogether. That was all he had ever paid on the shares. He did not pay the calls that were made on the shares, because he was never asked. There were at least three calls made on the shares. He was elected a director of the company in August or September, 1885, soon after the company was incorporated. He had the means to pay the calls, but not without borrowing. When he first incurred obligations on behalf of the company he had an overdraft at the bank, but he was solvent then. The only assets he then had were the properties at Geelong, Ascot Vale, and Gembrook, and those were all under mortgage to the Federal Bank for more than their value. He could not say what his liabilities were at the time. He first incurred a liability for the company after he had transferred everything to Fry und Co. He joined with the other directors of the Mutual Live Stock Financial and Agency Company, in giving a guarantee of £1,000 to the Bank of Australasia, at Geelong, on behalf of the company. The other directors told him it was necessary to give the guarantee, and said it would be cowardly if he did not give it. He next became liable for the company in August or September, 1886, and he believed he was solvent then. The second liability he incurred on behalf of the company was for a guarantee to the bank of Australasia, but he could not remember the amount of it. In August or September he incurred a third liability for the company. With the other directors he signed six promissory notes for £920 each. He got nothing for signing those notes, and received nothing on account of them. Tunmer, the manager of the company, told him when he signed the notes that they were intended to pay off the Bank of Australasia. He (witness) did not know how much was due to the bank then, and did not inquire. When he signed the notes he considered that he was solvent. He now knew that he was deficient to the extent of £13,000 when he had signed the promissory notes, and that, therefore, he could not have been solvent at the time he did so.
    The insolvent was ordered to file a debtor and creditor account with the Federal Bank, and an account of the manner in which he disposed of moneys that be received from the bank ; also an account of his dealings as agent for Davies, with whom he was formerly in partnership, showing how they stood at the dissolution of the partnership, an account of his liabilities when he entered into an agreement with Fry and Co ; an account of his dealings with the late Dr. Blair ; and an account of his liabilities and assets on each of the three occasions when he entered into obligations on behalf of the Mutual Live Stock Financial and Agency Company.
    The examination was then adjourned to the 2nd November.41
  • 5 Nov 1887, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22. Twelve O'Clock Noon. SORRENTO. A CHARMING SEASIDE RESIDENCE, BLAIRGOWRIE, With 127. 0r 9p.
    EXECUTRIX'S SALE.
    To Syndicates, Inventors, and Those Desiring Summer Resort In an Exceptionally Healthy Locality.
    JOHN BUCHAN and Co are instructed by the Perpetual Executors and Trustees Association of Australia Limited, agent for the executrix under the will of the late Dr John Blair, to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION, at their rooms, 87 Queen street, on Tuesday, 22ud November inst, at noon, BLAIRGOWRIE (The late Dr John Blair's country seat), A stone house, with wide verandah allround, erected by the late Hon M. O'Grady, containing in all eight rooms five thereof being large sized ones, well furnished, and ready for imme diate occupation, with cellar, outhouses, stable, &c., also large underground tank.
    The land, which is securely enclosed, improved, and well watered from spring, is most beautifully situated, and from its position and the various undu lations, is admirably adapted for subdivision with commanding views.
    The various lots contain 127 ACRES 0 ROODS 9 PERCHES, of which 23 acres 2 roods 18 perches is occupied by Mr Dark as a farm.
    There are also valuable limestone deposits on estate which can be worked to great advantage.
    In the vicinity are the properties of J Halfey and H. U. Alcock, Esquires, and Drs. Graham and Gunst, while the travelling facilities by the fast steamer Ozone, to be augmented by another equally fast boat in about six months, make this almost a suburb of Melbourne.
    The house is comfortably furnished and of inviting aspect. It is about two miles from Sorrento pier, half a mile from the proposed jetty at Canterbury, and within a quarter of an hours walk of the ocean beach.
    There is plenty of pasture for horses and milch kine on the land, which is also suitable for cultivation, and the neighbourhood abounds in picturesque walks and drives, so that it presents quite a combina tion of attractions as a seaside residence.
    Title perfect42
  • 12 Nov 1887, BEACONSFIELD, A MOUNTAIN HOME, With 100 ACRES of LAND. ADMINISTRATORS' SALE.
    JOHN BUCHAN and Co are instructed by the Perpetual Executors and Trustees Association of Australia Limited, administrators of the estate of the late Dr. John Blair, to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION, at their rooms, 87 Queen street, on Tuesday, November 22, at noon.
    Substantially built eight-roomed wooden house, coachhouse, stables, and other necessary outbuildings, good orchard, fruit trees of all sorts just coming into bearing.
    The property is well watered with natural creeks. Plantation round boundaries of over 1000 English and other trees.
    The property is situated on the Telegraph road, about 20 minutes walk from Beaconsfield house Hotel.
    The promised railway to Gembrook as surveyed passes through the land, and a railway station will be close to the house.
    "The Vagabond" says of BEACONSFIELD,
    "It is the most beautiful summer resort I know of in Australia."43

Citations

  1. [S65] Ancestry - various indices, Ancestry.com. Scotland, Select Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.
  2. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 6 May 1867, p1.
  4. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, www.emelbourne.net.au/biogs/EM00055b.htm
    Ann M. Mitchell.
  5. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 5357/P0000/3886
    72/49 JOHN BLAIR PAKENHAM 115 19--2--5. 1877 - 1879.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1162-350 - John Blair of Melbourne.
  7. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1803-445 - Archibald Dickson Hunter of Collins Street West Melbourne Merchant and John Blair of Melbourne Doctor of Medicine - tenants in common.
  9. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965 SWIFT 1885, farmer 80 acres N30 - paid by A D Hunter 9 May 1886.
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1565-912 - Archibald Dickson Hunter to John BLAIR of Collins Street East, Doctor of Medicine and Archibald Dickson HUNTER of Collins Street West, Merchant, both of Melbourne - Proprietors as tenants-in-common - C/T 1803-447.
  11. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 10 Mar 1887, p1.
  12. [S35] Probate Records, PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), 33/885 to Mary H BLAIR.
  13. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965.
  14. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1803-447 - The undivided half part in the property was transferred to Mary BLAIR on 6 Apr 1887 - registered on title 31 Oct 1890.
  15. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, HISTORICAL SKETCHES OF KINNEIL, CARRIDEN, AND BO’NESS
    c. 1550-1850 BY THOMAS JAMES SALMON.
  16. [S50] Miscellaneous Source, www.abc.net.au/lateline/content/2003/hc12.htm
    Published: 22/09/2003
    - Rey Tiquia, Victoria.
  17. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Parish: Borrowstounness; ED: 1; Page: 17; Line: 880; Year: 1841."
  18. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Parish: Edinburgh St Stephen; ED: 15; Page: 1; Line: 17; Roll: CSSCT1851_180; Year: 1851."
  19. [S45] Index of monumental inscriptions in the Melbourne General Cemetery,
    "GSV Index."
  20. [S14] Newspaper - Illustrated Australian News for Home Readers (Melbourne, Vic. : 1867 - 1875), Fri 20 Dec 1867, p6.
  21. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Sat 20 Aug 1870, p10.
  22. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Fri 9 Sep 1870, p2.
  23. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Mon 17 Oct 1870, p2.
  24. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 1 Mar 1872, p6.
  25. [S14] Newspaper - Leader, 9 Mar 1872, p21.
  26. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Saturday 9 Mar 1872, p 12.
  27. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 27 Jun 1874, p7.
  28. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 16 Feb 1875, p5.
  29. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Tue 27 Apr 1875, p6.
  30. [S235] Newspaper - The Ballarat Star "The Ballarat Star (Vic. : 1865 - 1924), Wed 10 Dec 1879, p4."
  31. [S14] Newspaper - Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 - 1918), Sat 23 Apr 1881, p21.
  32. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Sat 5 Jun 1886, p12.
  33. [S11] Newspaper - Argus The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Mon 14 Jun 1886, p11.
  34. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 10 Mar 1887, p7.
  35. [S16] Newspaper - The Age The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Thu 10 Mar 1887, p5.
  36. [S14] Newspaper - Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1859 - 1929), Thu 10 Mar 1887, p4.
  37. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 11 Mar 1887, p5.
  38. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 12 Mar 1887, p9.
  39. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Sat 12 Mar 1887, p12.
  40. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 7 Apr 1887, p5.
  41. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 27 Sep 1887, p7.
  42. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 5 Nov 1887, p16.
  43. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 12 Nov 1887, p16.
  44. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901.
Last Edited15 Jun 2019

Mary Hunter

F, #3180, b. 1838, d. 2 Aug 1921
Mary Hunter BLAIR
Father*Archibald Hunter b. 1804, d. b 1876
Mother*Jane Butterworth Dickson b. 1820, d. 18 May 1855
Married NameBlair. 
Birth*1838 Broxburn, Linlithgowshire, Scotland.1 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelSep 1854 Sailing with Archibald Hunter, Jane Butterworth Hunter, David Hunter, James Hunter, John Hunter, Jane Dickson Hunter, Archibald Dickson Hunter to Port Phillip, VIC, Australia. Ship Cheviot
Age 15.2
Marriage*27 Apr 1867 Spouse: Dr John Blair. VIC, Australia, #M1914.1
 
Marriage-Notice*6 May 1867Blair—Hunter.—On the 27th ult., by the Rev. A. Robertson, John Blair, M.R.C.S. Ed., to Mary, daughter of A. Hunter, Esq. No cards.3 
(Migrant) Migration/TravelApr 1881 Sailing with Dr John Blair to Bombay, India. Ship Hydaspes II - travelling to England.4
 
(Migrant) Migration/Travel3 Apr 1882 Sailing with Dr John Blair to Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Ship Indus from England
Age 38 - Lady.4
Widow9 Mar 1887Mary Hunter became a widow upon the death of her husband Dr John Blair.1 
Land-Note*6 Apr 1887 After her husband's death, Mary BLAIR was the sole beneficiary in his will. Probate included Freehold property situate in the Parish of Pakenham containing 80 acres and 7 perches being Crown Allotments 79.79A.111.112 and 113 enclosed and subdivided with post and rail and slat fence and on which land is erected a loghouse with iron roof containing 7 rooms, kitchen, dairy, storeroom, man's room, and 2 stalled stable, rated at £30 valued at £1429 in which deceased held a half interest jointly with Mr A D Hunter £714. Freehold property situate at Pakenham aforesaid Crown allotment 115 containing 19 acres 2 roods and 5 perches, no improvements valued at £195. The inventory also listed £87.10.0 of furniture at Beaconsfield. 
Land-UBeac6 Apr 1887 PAK-79.79A.111.112.113. Transfer from Dr John Blair to Mary Blair. Mary Blair was the beneficiary of Dr John Blair's will. Mary BLAIR & Archibald Dickson HUNTER are now tenants in common.5,6 
Land-Note*6 Apr 1887 After the death of her husband, Mary BLAIR inherited all his assets, including the land at Beaconsfield, which she now jointly holds with her brother. Within a week, Archibald D HUNTER was declared insolvent, and Robert Elwall JACOMB was appointed Assignee in his estate. 
Land-UBeac16 Oct 1889 PAK-115. Transfer from Robert Elwall Jacomb to Mary Blair. Mary Hunter Blair of Collins Street Melbourne Widow is registered as proprietor of the within described land as executrix to whom probate of the will of John Blair (who died on the 9th March 1887) was .. on the 6th April 1887.7 
Land-UBeac*16 Oct 1889 PAK-115. Transfer from Mary Hunter Robert Elwall Jacomb to William McCrea Hick. 19a 2r 5p.8 
Land-UBeac*24 Oct 1889 PAK-114. Transfer from Archibald Dickson Hunter to Mary Blair. 19a 1r 13p - Land File 402/49
Selected by A. D. HUNTER (no date). Crown grant to M. H. BLAIR on 24 Oct 1889.9,10 
Land-UBeac20 Dec 1889 PAK-114. Transfer from Mary Hunter to William McCrea Hick. 19a 1r 13p.11 
Civil Case1890 1890/1002 The Colonial Mutual Life Insurance Society Limited v Julius John Eardley Willmott Henry Vitara Mary Hunter Blair executrix of John Blair deceased and George Talbot Woolley.12 
Civil Case*1890 1890/6013 Archibald Davidson v Mary Hunter Blair.13 
Land-UBeac17 Oct 1890 PAK-79.79A.111.112.113. Transfer from Robert Elwall Jacomb to Mary Blair. Jacomb was the assignee in the insolvent estate of Mary Blair's brother.14 
Land-Note*31 Oct 1890 PAK-79.79A.111.112.113: Mortgagee: Albert Duncombe Terry. Mary Blair obtained a mortgage from Albert TERRY for £5400 at 7% for a number of her properties including Beaconsfield. By c1893 Terry was mortgagee in possession.. Mortgagor was Mary Blair.15 
Bill of Sale*1891 90560 Mary Hunter Blair Thomas Henry Corr Corner Wellington Parade and Berry Street East Melbourne - for £200 satisfied 1894 - viewed July 2019.16 
Land-UBeacc 1893 PAK-79.79A.111.112.113. Transfer from Mary Blair to Albert Duncombe Terry. Albert Terry took possession of the land of Mary Blair because she had defaulted on the mortgage.15 
Bill of Sale1893 97476 Mary Hunter Blair William Martin Sorrento known as Blairgowrie and Kinneil.17 
Civil Case1893 1893/3656 Mary Hunter Blair v William Martin.18 
Illness*17 Jul 1919 Admitted to Kew Asylum from Melbourne Benevolent Asylum in Cheltenham. Suffering from senile dementia. Discharged 21 Nov 1919. She was probably re-admitted in 1920, as she died at Kew, and her age is given as 60, which correlates to the age given at admission in 1919 (i.e. 58).19 
Death*2 Aug 1921 Kew Asylum, Kew, VIC, Australia, #D10487 (Age 60) [par unknown].20 
Inquest5 Aug 1921Inquest held 1921/#771. Cause of Death: Colitis.21 
Death-Notice*29 Aug 1921BLAIR.—On the 2nd August 1921, Mary Hunter, widow of the late Dr John Blair, of Collins street, Melbourne, aged 83.22 

Electoral Rolls (Australia) and Census (UK/IRL)

DateAddressOccupation and other people at same address
6 Jun 1841Broxburn, Uphall, West Lothian, Scotland(Head of Household) Archibald Hunter;
Age 3
Member(s) of Household: Jane Butterworth Hunter, David Hunter, James Hunter23
30 Mar 1851Branfield Cottage 26, Borrowstouness, West Lothian, Scotland(Head of Household) Archibald Hunter;
Age 12
Member(s) of Household: Jane Butterworth Hunter, James Hunter, John Hunter, Jane Dickson Hunter, Archibald Dickson Hunter24

Family

Dr John Blair b. 9 Mar 1834, d. 9 Mar 1887
Child 1.Lani Mulgrave Blair36 b. 1883, d. 16 Jan 1900

Newspaper-Articles

  • 1 Mar 1872, LAW REPORT. SUPREME COURT. CIVIL SITTINGS BEFORE EASTER TERM.
    OLD COURT HOUSE.—THURSDAY, FEB. 29.
    Before his Honour Mr. Justice Barry, and a Special Jury of Twelve.)
    CLARSON AND WIFE V. BLAIR.
    The hearing of this action was continued from the previous day. Plaintiffs are Mr. W. Clarson and his wife Caroline, and the defendant Mr. J. Blair, surgeon. The action is brought to recover damages for three indecent assaults on Mrs. Clarson, and also for libel on her. Plea "Not Guilty."
    Mr. Billing, Mr. Dunne, and Mr. Fisher, for plaintiffs; Mr. Ireland, Q.C., Mr. Higinbotham, and Mr. Wrixon, for defendant.
    The examination of Mrs. Clarson was resumed. She deposed,—I mentioned yesterday a letter I had written to Blair, after the aggression on the 24th June, 1864. After I left on that occasion I was greatly impressed with the fearful risk of what I said to Blair after this aggression, inducing him to think that I had left him upon conditions, and I wrote in consequence of that. I wrote to him on the 24th or 25th June. Subsequently to sending that letter I saw Blair, but had no conversation referring further to the risk. In September, 1864, I remember passing his house in the afternoon ; I believe it was about the 17th of the month. I had a pain in my left breast at the time, and, seeing Blair in the hall, I went in to consult him. I told him how I felt, and he asked me to allow him to see it. He was sitting in a chair near the table. I unfastened my dress, and bent towards him to show him my bosom. He drew me between his knees, and felt my breast, which he said was swollen, but that he did not think any harm would come of it, and that it would soon be better. While I was standing up fastening my dress, he placed his hand upon me in an objectionable manner.
    Mr. IRELAND remarked, that such evidence was inadmissible, but that it would be prejudicial to his client if he raised any objection to it.
    Mr DUNNE, to witness.—You may relate anything he said, but I cannot ask you what he did on this occasion.
    Examination continued.—I left immediately after his aggression. As I was going he said, "You have left your purse on the table," and handed it to me. I then left. Three or four days later I wrote him a long letter, which I did not send, and a short note, which I did. In the note I asked him to call on me, but did not refer to any past transactions. I think I told him I had a letter written which I wished him to read, but which I was precluded from send-ing him. He did read that letter, and it was destroyed immediately. As nearly as I can recollect, I told him in it that the effects of his conduct—his disgusting conduct—on my mind had made me feel as if I had had a serious bilious attack, without experiencing any relief, and also that it had, as it were, at one blow severed me from my husband. I also told him I had sent him a letter be-cause I was determined never to go into his house again unless he promised me firmly that I should never be subjected to another indelicate attack from him. In all those letters I censured him severely, but in kind terms. I knew a Mr. Friend, of Geelong, a solicitor. When he had read the long letter Blair apologised to me, and said he was very sorry for what he had done, and that I should have no more occasion to find fault with him. He said he would never believe that God had given men such feelings unless—I forget the direct words—they were meant to be in-dulged. I replied "No, God created or gave marriage for that purpose." In the October following my husband brought me home a present. After I received it I saw Blair at his house. I went there because my mind had been upset. My memory fails me as to what occurred at that interview. I said to him "My husband's goodness inclines me to tell him all." He asked if anything had transpired likely to injure him. I said I did not know, but that I hoped not. I do not remember Blair ever going on his knees to me, but he has stooped, and, with tears in his eyes, has asked me not to think evil of the past, or to think evil of him on account of the past. On one occasion, when I referred to the danger of my telling my husband what had happened, Blair said. "Good God, I shall be shot." During 1865 I frequently saw him. He was on visiting terms with my husband, as usual—even more so than usual. He was more frequently at our house than ever, and was always welcomed by us. He went on several shooting excursions with my husband. I was at Blair's house during that year, more often as a patient than as a visitor. I believe my husband went in occasionally. I became acquainted with Miss Hunter in 1863. She is now Mrs. Blair. She came to my house as a visitor. Blair did not become acquainted with her at my house. I have been informed there was a breach of promise between them before I knew them. But they subsequently became reconciled, and were friends when I knew them. In September, 1866, I first became aware that they were engaged. He was in the habit of visiting at my house the same time that Miss Hunter was there. I remember receiving a letter from Blair, dated December 28, 1865, in which, in accordance with a promise previously made, he told me that he was thinking of getting married. In that letter he promised further details, and expressed the hope that once and for all our disputes might be settled. He further said, "I am very sorry to be the cause of pain to you, knowing the delicate state of your nervous system. For the past, pray accept my apology ; and I earnestly trust for the future, our friendship may continue uninterrupted." I remember having a conversation with Blair on August 7, 1865, respecting an operation. He said a simple surgical operation would enable me to have children. A little before this interview, I told Blair that I had thought much of what he had told me about the operation, and that for my husband's sake, and also, as it might be the means of passing off my mind more effectually, I was quite willing to suffer any sacrifice that the operation might be performed. He said, "Oh no, let nature do its own work—you are far too unselfish." I was disappointed at his views, for I felt I could not go to anyone else. He refused to perform the operation. I wrote to him next day, urging him to take the matter into his consideration. I generally addressed him in my letters in very affectionate terms. I might have written "My Dearest Doctor," but I never addressed him otherwise than in his capacity as a doctor. I have addressed him as "My Darling Doctor." I generally wrote long letters to him. I wrote on this occasion that in consequence of all I had suffered in the past I did not care whether I lived or died, that his secret would be safe with me, as I would die rather than tell of it, and that even if I died through the opera-tion he need have no fear. He called on me after this letter, on the second day after. I asked him if he thought me too old to have this operation performed, and also asked what age he thought me. He said somewhere between 30 and 40. I said, "Tell me truly what you think ; I shall not care if you think me 50." He replied, "Oh, well, 35." I asked him if he had brought his instruments with him, for I quite thought he had come to do as I wished. Witness gave his reply, and added—I knew he meant something wrong by that, and said, "Oh, doctor, I never thought of anyone but my husband being the father of my child." [Witness here became so much affected and faint that she had to be accommodated with a chair, and the examination was discontinued for a short time.]
    Examination continued.—Defendant made no observation in reply to the last remark I made. He went away almost immediately. Knew a Mrs. Wimble who resided at Northcote. Gave a photograph to her, and to Miss Hunter, who was residing with her. The photograph produced is one of myself. I had only two photographs taken of me in this (a sitting) position. The photograph produced (exhibit B) is one of them. It was taken by a wandering photographer. Had never any copies of this photograph taken. I am familiar with Mr. Blair's handwriting. The letter produced is in his writing (exhibit C) :—
    "Sir.—Your wife's communications by letters and packets duly received, I need not add, contributing not a little to our amusement.
    "Enclosed is a little bit for the pamphlet, if you can find space, accompanied with an order for 15 copies (if it be well printed).
    "The accompanying work of art may either be used to illuminate the book, or it may come in handy as a design for a transparency at the forthcoming Zoological picnic."
    Was not present when that letter was received. [Photograph (exhibit D) handed to witness.] I know nothing of the mutilation of this picture. I only saw it when I was looking over the papers for the last trial. The word "copy" on it is in Mr. Blair's writing. The reference to the receipt of letters and packets in exhibit C refers to a letter to him, and one I sent to him, en-closing copies I sent to his mother in Scot-land and his wife, and to a packet I sent to Mrs. Blair. Wrote a letter to the subscribers to the Alfred Hospital on 22nd August 1870. [Letter handed in—exhibit E.] The reference in Mr. Blair's letter to the pamphlet is to one I told him l would write myself. It is not the one published by my husband. When I lived at Royal terrace I took lessons in horse exercise from a lady. Afterwards we went to East Melbourne, and one day in December, 1866, we expected a visit from Miss Hunter. She did not come as proposed to spend a day, and Mr. Blair was to come later. Miss Hunter came late in the evening with Mr. Blair. I believe I was not in the house at the time. A day or two after, about 5 o'clock, Mr. Blair's carriage drove past, with two ladies, whom I believed to be Miss Hunter and Mrs. Wimble. I went to Mr. Blair's house, in Collins street, to ask why they had not come to my place as arranged. I thought I might meet Miss Hunter there. I stayed till nearly 7 o'clock, when his carriage drove to the door. He got down to open the door and Miss Hunter went into the surgery. I was in the reception-room, and said, "Stay, doctor, I wish to speak to Miss Hunter." I said to her, "I came to know the reason you treated me like this, Miss Hunter ; you could not treat a beggar like that ; if you were a lady you could not have done it." Miss Hunter turned to Blair, and said, "I thought there would be a row about it ;" and addressing me, said, "You were not at home when I did call." I said, "You know the attachment I form for a man or woman is sincere from my heart." Mr. Blair sat at the table, saying he was sorry it happened. I then went away. Mr. Blair opened the door and asked me to take a glass of wine, which I refused. Subsequently certain statements were made to me, in consequence of which I told my husband what had occurred. I was in the defendant's house twice after that interview with Miss Hunter, the first next morning, and the second on 7th January, 1867. Saw Mr. Blair, and said I understood he told me an untruth in reference to Miss Hunter going from Melbourne to Geelong and asked him why he deceived me in that matter. I made some reference to a promise of marriage, but he misunderstood me. He got up, and said, "As God lives I made no promise to Miss Hunter of marriage." I said, "You mistake me ; I don't mean that." He also said the reason Miss Hunter had not visited me on the appointed day was because Mr. Wimble had told him I introduced his wife and Miss Hunter to a lady of bad character. I asked him how he came to think so, and he said he only heard it from Mr. Wimble. I said, "Dr. Blair, did you not know I was not aware she was a woman of bad character, and did you not tell them I did not know it ? " He did not answer. Just then a buggy drove to the door, and he told me to go upstairs. I did go, but nothing particular happened after that. I was very angry, because I felt it was the greatest wrong he had done me. I don't remember when I told my husband. I bore it as long as I could. I think I told him about 10 days after this occurrence. On the same day as the interview to which I last alluded I wrote Mr. Blair a letter, saying, "This must end our correspondence." He called on me the next day, and spoke about it. I had written that I was annoyed at his allowing my friends to entertain that opinion of me, but I still thought I should be able to keep it from my husband. He said, "I am sorry you have had this quarrel with Miss Hunter." I said, "Miss Hunter is a nice young lady to find fault with my conduct after what you have told me, that you allowed her to enter your house with a latchkey." He said he really had not had time to read my letter. When I spoke about the latchkey he got up, very excited, and, putting his hand on his heart, said, "My latchkey, my latchkey," and walked away. That was the last time I saw him.
    Cross examined by Mr. IRELAND.—I was married in June, 1854. I was 50 years of age last birthday. I had no doubts of the impropriety of the defendant's conduct on the occasion of the aggression on 26th December, 1863.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Did you not consider it a gross and outrageous insult to you ?
    Witness.—Not while he was merely putting his arms round me to support me.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You said, "I am afraid you mistake the nature of my affectionate re-gard ?" How came you to have this affectionate regard ?
    Witness.—He had been an intimate ac-quaintance of mine as well as my doctor.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Were you in love with him ?
    Witness.—No, I was not. I highly regarded him. I entertained a friend's regard for him. After the transaction I have narrated I con-tinued on the same terms with my husband as before, but I did not then tell him what had occurred.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Why did you not call out when the defendant took liberties with you— a married woman—at the December visit ?
    Witness.—I have told you the state of my illness, and I could scarcely speak at the time. There was a little boy of about seven years of age in the waiting-room, near the reception room, where the interview took place. After this occurrence I went to the defendant's house for prescriptions.
    Mr. IRELAND.—How could you, as a modest woman, go back to a man who treated you in the abominable manner you describe ?
    Witness.—I do not know that I can explain more than I have.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Did you see any impropriety in it ?
    Witness.—I believe it is generally considered so.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Why did you go back after being so grossly insulted ?
    Witness.—I did not feel the impropriety as others might see it.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Why did you not cease to be his patient ?
    Witness.—I did not wish to break the peace. Circumstances led me to do so later.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Could you not discontinue your attendance without breaking the peace ?
    Witness.—I do not think so, because he was intimate with us, and it would have been impossible for me to have given up my medical man without my husband's know-ledge. If he had known it I must have told him everything.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Did the defendant mention to you that he never thought of insulting you ?
    Witness.—He did not say "insult." I said in a letter to him, that I could only consider his actions as a trial of my virtue.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Did you not say his first aggression might have been caused by your illness ?
    Witness.—Yes. On reflection, I think that my illness might have been the cause of it. His conduct, in the first instance, when he supported me in his arms, might have been justified by my illness, but not his wrong afterwards. I mean that his first acts towards me during my illness—what I may call his supporting actions—were caused through my illness, and that they might have induced him to do the other wrong.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You think that what he did first he did professionally, but that he went a little too far ?
    Witness.—Yes, truly so.
    Mr IRELAND.—Were you in love with him ? Witness.—No, not in your sense. I had a great regard for him.
    Mr. IRELAND.—So it appears.
    Witness.—I had known him for three years previously, during which he had not been guilty of a wrong look or a wrong act.
    Mr. IRELAND.—On the 23rd June, 1864, you had a conversation with him about the baby ?
    Witness.—Not the baby, but a baby. I did not consider it at all improper to have such a conversation with my medical man.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Did you consider it modest and proper for you, after the manner you had been treated, to have such a conversation with him ?
    Witness.—I know I ought never to have entered his house again.
    Mr. IRELAND.—How many years did it take you to find that out ?
    Witness.—It was not until 1867 I found it out. Circumstances afterwards transpired that left me without liberty to act otherwise. I was at his house in 1867, and I went there twice after the interview I have described, at which his present wife was present.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Did you see no impropriety in it ?
    Witness.—No, I was not thinking at all of it. I know it was wrong, and I have never made it out right. I did not feel in a position to be rid of him. As time went on I knew that greater evil was involved, and I felt greater fear at telling my husband or allowing him to know all the past.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You first saw the necessity of mentioning the matter after Blair was married?
    Witness.—That is false. I named the matter to my husband within a week or 10 days after I last saw the defendant.
    Mr. IRELAND.—After you saw Miss Hunter spent the evening there?
    Witness.—Yes. I took an interest in Miss Hunter's movements because she was a mutual friend.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Because the defendant allowed some observation about you to go unchallenged, you considered he had been guilty of an extreme wrong to you—worse even than the liberties he took with you?
    Witness.—I felt it so. That other wrong was more against my husband than myself.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You seem to have taken it very easily?
    Witness.—That was my fault. It was not because I did not feel it. I have not mentioned all the occasions I was at the defend-ant's house. I was there in the daytime and the evening, sometimes alone. I took a great interest in him, but I had no evil thoughts on that account. I have been in his house when he was out, but I did not take my work there. I have been in his bedroom when he was out. I took the measurements of his bed in order to make some crape curtains for it. I made the curtains, and sent them to his house to be put up. The defendant had told Mr. Clarson at our house that he could not rest at night, as he was so tormented with mosquitoes. That was what induced me to make them. I had no evil feeling in doing it. I have sent him flowers, slippers, a cigar case, fruit, &c. I once sent him some mince pies.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Did he not repeatedly beg you to discontinue your visits?
    Witness.—Never. Yes, on one occasion he was angry at my coming about dinner-time. I came to show him a drawing I had been doing as a lesson he set me. He proposed to teach me drawing because my mind was often burdened by his conduct. He never handed me back a bundle of letters, telling me that he had never opened some of them, or read most of them. I saw some of my letters to him in a drawer of his that was open, and I said, "Why keep my letters?" He said, "Oh, I don't know." I then said, "Why not destroy them?" He told me that if any other person saw them they wonld look upon them as criminal but that he understood the contrary. I have written letters to his present wife, and they have been returned to my husband. I sent open letters through the post addressed to his wife; I was determined she should read them. They were sometimes returned to my husband.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Did you go to Robertson and Moffatt's and get a stay-box, and send it, directed to Mrs. Blair, with a letter inside it? Witness.—I had a stay box by me, and I put one of Robertson and Moffatt's tickets on it, and sent a letter inside it to Mrs Blair. I sent a letter to Mrs. Blair, of Glasgow, the mother of the defendant. The defendant did not refuse to accept my presents, but he said, "Oh don't trouble yourself; I am ashamed of your kindness." I sent a letter to the de-fendant on May 5, 1864. The following are extracts from it:
    "My very dear Doctor,—Although so, in the first place (or rather in the next) I am going to tell you that you are a very disadreable creature for your disobedience to my wishes, and that at a time when I could not scold you for it, viz., outside the door of the house.
    I have told you before never to trouble me by telling me that you are ashamed to accept the little proofs my friendship towards you, and I think it very unkind of you to do so. You know the time will come when I shall not be able to thus indulge, although my heart's warmth will not have abated, and so, why deprive me now of one of the pleasures of my life? 'Tis really very selfish of you; and if I had not an affectionate regard for you, in spite of all your faults, all would return upon myself.
    "Of course, dearest doctor, joking aside, if I really thought my little presents were annoying to you, I would desist; but I trust you do not feel them so. I scarcely know what to say to help you to feel, or look upon them as I would wish you to. I can only think of, as if they were sent by one of your sisters or your mother, or an aunt—not that I mean I resemble either, in one sense, but I think you might look upon my acts as thus homely in this matter.
    "If you could feel towards me as I do to you, you would better understand the purely disinterested affection which must display itself in the best form it may according to circumstances.
    "I feel a little sorry you thought fit to tell me who it was with you on Monday, because I am half afraid you will think me unwar-rantably interested about you in such matters ; but my dear friend, you must not, for I feel sufficiently at home with you to ask you, if I particularly wish to know anything about your love affairs. By the by, this reminds me that I have something of the sort to ask you about, when I am able to get out and call on you again.
    "In conclusion on this subject I would say, if I thought you would be happier for it, I should be happy to see you married to-morrow. As I have told you before, if you could have a right to, and had, fifty wives, it would not make my affection for you the less; therefore, you see, 'tis not of a nature to feel opposed to any proper connexion.
    "As you will see, dear doctor, the former part of this is a sort of introduction to the covered pots accompanying this, which I hope you will not look upon as too much like self-will ; if so, why then the tables will have to be turned, and you must scold me—really scold me I mean.
    "On Monday Mr. Clarson proposed sending you a joint of kangaroo, but I said no, for I thought it would be no use to you unless you had it set before you in some way more tasty than merely boiled or roasted; so I told him I would prepare you some. He said he 'was afraid I was not paying you any compliment by sending you cooked dishes.' I said I did not think you looked upon it in that light. I said also, it might not be any to your servant; but then I think she is too good-natured a creature, and simple, to feel hurt at anything of the kind sent by your friends. I wish I had the chance of teaching her, to the best of my knowledge, to add to your comfort in these little matters.—Your sincere little friend,
    CARRIE CLARSON.

    "P.S.—I scarce need add that if you knew how cheerful your little visits has made me, you would feel repaid in some measure for your mirey walk."
    Cross examination continued.—I also sent the defendant the following verses in 1864 :
    "With laurels his brow I'd deck,
    Barely none deserve so well As he whose life is given
    To 'suage pain, and mortal ill. Pink of woman's devotion,
    Acknowledg'd emblem bright;
    It's thy need through life unknown,
    But brightest in grief its light. What more faithful than a dog ?
    As thus may thy friendships prove; How great the boon, tell who can,
    Whose life's griefs by such are soothed. Oft in friendship's guise, alas !
    How many in life we meet,
    Nor trace in the sparkling draught
    There's poison with the sweet. Go, go, tell each emblem fair
    What friendship and love combined,
    Would ask for one while life lasts,
    And when life's bright scenes shall end.
    May peace and plenty he posses,
    Portrai'd by tbe dove and horn;
    A heart on gratitudes wing,
    Oft rise and heav'nward borne.
    But the earthborn friendships die, The heavenborn are without end, Thy greatest bliss, be it known,
    Is to feel thy God thy friend.
    Mon cher ami, thus stands reveal'd
    My heart's best wishes for thee, And surely if verified
    Heart ease will no stranger be.
    "CAROLINE 1864"

    Cross-examination continued.—I also wrote to the defendant in 1866, asking him to pro-cure tickets for the return ball of Friday, October 6, 1866. I wrote :-—
    "I know a lady who is going, if possible, as a vendor of flowers, a contribution towards the erection of a hospital in the suburbs. She will have with her an immense basket, with a suitable ticket, and the proceeds are to be placed in your hands, it being supposed that you will be there; and should it be that such a place is not built, it is to be handed over to the Orphan Asylum. This of course is a pro-found secret, but will you oblige me, and I will repay you the earliest opportunity. Yours obliged, "C. CLARSON.
    "P.S. If it was thought that you would not be there, I think the scheme would be given up."
    If my husband went with me the proceeds of the flowers were to go to the hospital, but if my son only accompanied me the money was to go to the Orphan Asylum. I sent the following letter to the defendant. The first leaf is torn in half (lengthways), and half returned to my husband with my photograph.
    Mr. IRELAND asked the plaintiffs to produce the missing fragment.
    It was not produced, and the remainder of the letter was then read :— . . . . "And again, dearest, one word for the future. I am sure it will not be beneath that philosophy to which you lay some claim, if you now also begin to think more of the future. The past you know, but not so that which is to come, and there is no need that the ignorance should render us unhappy ; and we are at all events on the safe side, if we lay asside from an abundance, especially for a rainy day, and should with William to be with me, it never comes to us, then will it not repay our forethought to have it to spare for the rainy days of others?
    "I know you enough, dear, to see how thoroughly characteristic you can be, then put it in practice more, for your own real good, and live not a life of dream, the awaking from which would only cause you and those who really love you sorrow. Are these not those on whom you're expending your affluence who are not worthy, and who would be the first to forsake you in the hour of trouble? They only care for you for the sake of what you are able to earn and place at their disposal. Be awakened, my own darling doctor, to the truth, shake off that dreamy state of things which forebodes no bright future, should you lose your health. I feel sure you will take this from me kindly. My affection is the scourse of my fears for your fu-ture, and not a spirit of mere interference or pre-sumption on your having proved that I at least sometimes have a place in your thoughts; and very dear are those thoughts to me, even if they only consist in, 'Well, I must call on her to day, to-morrow,' or any other time.
    "If I thought, dearest, what I have said above would vex you, I would never repeat it, but I have such a wish to be of some service to you, and were I situated differently, I should feel it no degradation to serve you by taking all the care of your house off your shoulders, while you remained as you are, my only object being that of doing you a service.
    "Of course, dear, I only speak of this as a figure, of how in any way I could serve you if opportunity offered, of which, of course their is little chance, for William often tells me, that should anything happen to him before myself, he will be able to leave me independent, and I should never marry again; but even that would not prevent me doing you such a service if you pleased to give me such a charge, or even now I would not hesitate to relieve you if a proper arrangement could be made.
    "I know how trying to the constitution must be your profession, and if your life and health is being consumed at the shrine of duty only, well, for 'tis better to wear out than rust out. But, loved one, if you are sacrificing your consti-tution, health, and good looks, additionally, for the sake of the pleasure of others, or even your own, you will in the future have that to regret so let me talk to you as any affec-tionate sister would to her brother whom she loves with great affection, you know my affection is even something beyond that for you ; well, then, make an effort to suppress the power your acquaintances seem to have of stealing from your rest doubly needful for you, as of necessity it must be broken. I know you to have a strong will of your own whenever you think fit to exercise it; there-fore exert it in this matter, and let not those virtues you possess of generosity, &c., work to your own ruin of health and life. Now is the time, dearest, begin gradually and it will be effectual, and they are no friends to you who will try to thwart your good purpose, with-draw at a reasonable hour, and they will soon understand that it is not your pleasure to sit up; and as to the world, 'Honi soit qui mally pense'. It would not trouble me; but of course, dear, you with me will look on this as it is a day dream, though.
    "P.S.—You seldom or ever comment on any part of my letters, is it too much that you should tell me whether you appreciate the warmth of my heart towards you?
    "The truth of my heart be its source, and it is given, more, perhaps, that you may feel how ready I am at all times to serve you. Farewell my own darling doctor."
    Examination continued.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Did you ever tell the de-fendant that you were charged with elec-tricity, and that he was the only one who could take it out of you?
    Witness.—I never did. I might have men-tioned to him that I had been told I was fully charged with electricity.
    At this stage there was an adjournment for half-an-hour. On leaving the court Mrs. Clarson was seized with an hysterical attack, from which, however, she recovered in a few minutes. On the Court resuming, the exa-mination was continued.
    Witness.—I sent the following letter to Mrs. Blair, mother of defendant:—

    "Melbourne, 27th May, 1867.
    "Madam,—Although the purport of the accompanying must, I know, but wound the heart of any mother, especially that of the good woman I have heard you to be, nevertheless, as I deem it the means whereby to reach the heart of your evil disposed son, Mr. John Blair, surgeon, Collins-street east, Melbourne, whose fate it has been to cross my path for the last eight years, I make the attempt. It may be that a word from a mother, though past your jurisdiction, may direct his mind to contemplate with some degree of shame the curse he has brought on at least one of the happiest of married couples through the loose and evil propensities of his nature, aided by the cloak his profession allows, and his professed return of friendship for me.
    "In times of confidence he has told me of your care of his youth, and how anxiously you gave him in charge to some gentleman (I think at college), who abused the trust you placed in him, who, instead of guarding him from evil, trained him in it, and his nature has been so far from refinement and dutiful recollections as to express to me some pleasure or amusement in your having been so deceived in your good and anxious care for his morality. The two enclosed are my husband's and my own last letters to him, and the details of our inter-course will reach you in pamphlet form, I doubt not.
    "Respectfully yours, "CAROLINE CLARSON. "To Mrs. John Blair, sen."

    Mr. IRELAND.—What was your object in writing to the old lady, Mrs. Blair?
    Witness.—Because I trusted her home influence would work on the doctor's mind, that he might feel and show how wrongly he had acted.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Then you wished to work a kind of mental conversion with him?
    Witness.—Why not ? That was my object. I did not send the letter open through the post. [A letter was handed to witness, consisting of several small leaves of foolscap, pinned together, another leaf containing the address and the postmark.] I sent this letter, but it is not the one I mean. I suppose I sent it open. I did not remember that. I sent it that way to be sure that the contents reached the mother.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Could she not have opened it?
    Witness.—She might have returned it unopened, as she knew my handwriting. I had written to her before this.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Why did you send this letter?
    Witness.—To show all the truth with respect to his character.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Then it was not with the view to reclaim him.
    Witness.—No.
    Mr. IRELAND,—To punish him.
    Witness.—To show his mother that I knew I spoke the truth.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Then you thought that she would not believe it at first.
    Witness.—I don't know. I wished to show I had additional proofs.
    Mr. IRELAND.—And this was the "emblem of brightness," the "dear doctor," the man in whose welfare you took so much interest, that you, a married woman, wished to become his housekeeper.
    Witness.—My husband was to live with us.
    Mr. Blair knew that.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You were to go there to take care of Blair, and your husband to take care of you.
    Witness.—I did not say that.
    Mr. IRELAND.—If you had not been a married woman, you would not have con-sidered it a degradation to serve him?
    After a long pause the witness said, "I cannot remember my feeling at the time. After the reconciliation of March, 1864, I was satisfied with him. He promised not to repeat his misconduct He did, however, repeat it in June, 1864. You know I made visits to him after that, and measured his bed for a set of blue curtains. Mr. Clarson did not know of this measuring. I was on amicable terms with defendant then. I wished to forget all that had occurred for the sake of all parties concerned. I first knew that he was going to be married September, 1866.
    Mr. IRELAND.—What caused your sudden revulsion of feeling with regard to him ?
    Witness.—On account of his fiendish con-duct in telling mutual friends that I asso-ciated with a woman of bad character.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Was that the whole cause? Witness.—I don't say it was the whole cause. I had told him of my acquaintance with this woman, and he knew I did not know she was a bad character.
    Mr. IRELAND.—But what did he do to cause this terrible outburst, raking up transactions as far back as 1863.
    Witness.—I told him his conduct was most insulting, about not defending me when Mrs. Wimble spoke of that woman. I sent no letters to his patients as such. I sent nine letters altogether, in consequence of Miss Hunter going to a pubic meeting and saying that a certain lady who was a bad character was introduced by me. She was Mrs. Blair then. Sent the letter produced, May 1868, to Mrs. Blair, 12 months after her marriage.
    "Two reasons give me especial gratification in your marriage, though not one vexes me ; the first is, believing with my whole heart that the pure, chaste man who married you was forced to, chiefly through me (it is said through some other lady), but that I think only a possibility ; my second reason, that henceforth you shall be my medium of com-munication to him, so I am at least one remove from the relation of a correspondent of his.
    "I desire now that you inform him that I have so much faith in the reports of his immoral life that I deem it a degradation that he should signally recognise me at any time. I look upon it as a tacit insult to me, and after this if continued, if I cannot give him in charge for such cowardice, I shall inform my husband, who doubtless will find means to teach him that it will not be allowed with impunity. Position!
    "The position of the wife of such a well-known character is so exalted that her silly simper can but be overwhelming.
    "If this has been the result of a late triumph, I will tell you what I have known of its foundation from the day following his exaltation.
    "On the evening of his readmission, the gentleman, that one in great haste—'Halloo !
    where are you off to in such haste?' 'I'm going to the Royal Society.' 'Oh, what's up there?'
    'Oh, Blair has been black-balled, and we are going to shove him in.'
    "How welcome are you to such a triumph, and all such, for it little matters to me how many care for him, so long as his character is known to them. The companionship of a king would only impress the writer.
    "May 4, 1868
    "The truth of the proverb, 'Birds of a feather flock together.' And the day will come when the judgment of God that shall stand.
    "May 6, 1868
    " 'The continued dropping of water weareth away stones.' Why is it asked that if certain letters clear from certain charges, why no trial? After a public charge has been entered against your husband, your spirits are bitter enough."
    Mr. IRELAND.—I thought his moral life was all condoned, and that you only complained of his not defending your character.
    Witness.—I had an opportunity after my separation from Mr. Blair of having many proofs of his being immoral which I did not previously know unless in my own case.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You thought it necessary to write all this to a woman only married 12 months?
    Witness.—She had ridiculed me.
    Mr. IRELAND.—And married him; and that accounts for the whole thing.
    Witness.—She had belied my character.
    Mr. IRELAND.—What did you mean by writing about the triumph ?
    Witness.—I thought Mr. Blair had no right in the Royal Society.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Because he married Miss Hunter?
    Witness.—False, false, false. I have a letter to deny that. (It appeared that this was one addressed by the witness to Mrs. Wimble.)
    Mr. IRELAND.—What king did you allude to?
    Witness.—An immoral king. Mr. IRELAND.—Supposing he was moral?
    Witness.—Then he would not care for his companionship. I meant that no matter how high his associations, I had that in my mind which knew he was not good.
    Mr. IRELAND.—And you consider that a proper letter?
    Witness.—Yes, under the circumstances.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You meant to wear her out? Witness.—Oh no, no, no. I never meant it. I was speaking the truth. I never spoke anything but the truth. I don't know how many letters I sent to Mrs. Blair, from a dozen to half a dozen. I did not know that the postman had orders not to deliver any of my letters.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Then, why did you have recourse to the milliner's boxes?
    Witness.—Because I would be certain the letters would meet her eye. I don't know they were sent away, nor that the servant had orders not to take my letters. I resorted to the milliner's boxes because it was necessary to know the letters had not miscarried. I sent a letter in an envelope addressed "To the proprietor of the House, 101 Collins-street. Please to keep the enclosed clean, Will call again for orders."
    The letter was as follows :—
    "Mrs. John Blair,—For every known letter of mine to you sent to Mr. Clarson by you or yours I distribute open copies of the same, which doubtless will meet you or your coward husband where least expected, and if not their contents are with strangers. What your object? You may feel assured that all such moves on your part or Blair's will ever tend only to facilitate the keeping of my word, namely, the making known this truth, that John Blair, of Collins street, is a cowardly medical villain, and he dare not deny the truth honourably."
    [The witness explained that before the word "distribute" she had meant to insert "will."]
    Mr. IRELAND.—The words about calling for orders on the envelope are in print. What did you mean by them?
    Witness.—I associate nothing with them. I don't know what Mrs. Blair might associate with them.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You wrote this letter to Mrs. Blair:—
    "Richmond-park, August, 1869.
    "This my answer to your defiance of me intimated by your gesture on the night of the Governor's ball, July 14, 1869. You pat him in public, but quarrel in private."— How do you know that?
    Witness.—I don't know it. I would not have written the letter if she had not made the gesture. This requires explanation. We had met at the supper-table. In their party were Mr. and Mrs. Blair, two other medical gentlemen, and two ladies. As soon as Mrs. Blair caught my eye, she turned round and patted him on the shoulder. (Roars of laughter.)
    Mr. IRELAND.—That vexed you?
    Witness.—No.
    Mr. IRELAND.—It pleased you? Witness.—No.
    Mr. IRELAND.—I suppose it would have pleased you to see them quarrel. (Reading the letter.) "You know that you are not in private as the wife of that fellow as you are in public, though not at all times in public does he keep the curtain drawn. Witness especially his conduct to you at Taylor's chapel, and when intending with you to luncheon on the Galatea. Woman, you sold yourself to a sensual dishonourable liar in John Blair, to injure me who never injured you, except in being the means chiefly and intentionally of making you his wife." I think it was you were sold and not she. How did she injure you?
    Witness.—By saying I was acquainted with a bad character.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You mean by marrying him.
    Witness.—No, I don't. But as his wife she carried about stories that I was a bad cha-racter. She had opportunities of doing so as his wife. That was my only meaning. I complained not of the relationship, but of the consequences of it.
    Mr. IRELAND (continuing the letter.)—"My motive at first for your happiness—until I found so many proofs of his having no more love for you than he ever had for me. But now I know it to be your curse, though you may have become so, one with his base cha-racter, that you cannot feel you are in a degraded position. . . . . Is it no curse that a husband has not sufficient respect even for his wife (to say nothing of love) to keep from making a drunken beast of himself when from his home and wife? Opinion and taste may differ, certainly, but where is your influ-ence for good."—You were vexed because he had no more love for her than for you.
    Would it not be more correct to say "because he had more love ?"
    Witness.—No ; because I had not thought of it. I thought it necessary to write this letter in consequence of the circumstances by which I was surrounded.
    Mr. IRELAND (continuing the letter.)—"What an exceedingly complaisant set the fellow has met with, who, though he has dishonourably and cowardly betrayed the crimes, indiscre-tions, imprudences, and weakness of his friends and those near and dear to him, even after he married, and they know it, and they add to the above cowardice. Instance Mr. —— But does he dream that by continuing the society of Dr. Blair, who has betrayed ——'s criminality in saying that —— was a patient of his for that foul disease which ever must be a disgrace to man, especially if married?" That was a nice amiable letter to send to a young woman just after she was married.
    Witness.—Well, I was insulted everywhere I was met.
    Mr. IRELAND continued reading the letter of which the following are the principal re-maining extracts :—"My expressed thoughts would always be those—you are but the wife of a medical, cowardly villain, married to aid him in crushing one whom he has im-plored to forgive him an evil which, if ex-posed at that time, would have placed him upon the roads. . . In your dirty work as Blair's shield you are foiled, for I vowed, not in vain, that Blair should be known, and time will yet prove that the whole tenor of my life before and since Blair sought me for his patient, but gives the lie to you and yours in reference to my character; except it be in doing as your female set are doing, and for which chiefly you were married, namely, that of aiding the crimes of a medical villain in the person of John Blair, of Collins-street.

    "I know better, also, than to call gaieties happiness; nevertheless, I attend as the wife of one known as one of the world's most honourable of men, he having a true moral worth, which your husband has neither in soul or body, and I shall continue to go as it pleases me ; also my ever-acknowledged good husband is pleased to permit my indulging in such matters, therefore, when I meet you, where you are only too glad of the opportunity to follow me, though you once told me that Blair looked but lightly upon women who attended balls, theatres, &c., know that one of my reasons is and was to defy you and yours.

    "Pray do not mistake me; when I vowed to make Blair known I did not vow that it would make his 'female' 'set' hate his character; although when among his like sensual villains, he says, 'that all women are —— at heart,' such sayings will also make their way to an opposite class of men ; therefore I heard it legitimately. Doubtless, it would suit his taste better if more women were in practice, and not merely at heart, as he says.
    "Why would he never meet myself, his accuser, face to face, though challenged? Ask him why. "CAROLINE CLARSON."

    Witness.—The remark made in the letter is one that he made to me himself.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Are you not ashamed of yourself to have written such a letter to a young married woman?
    Witness.—No ; I am not, though I admit it does look unamiable.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You visited Mr. Blair after 1864, and you sent him presents notwithstand-ing all he had done to you ?
    Witness.—I don't deny it. The last aggression on me was September 17, 1864. His actions weighed greatly on my mind. I sent him a scarf-pin in 1866 as a birthday present. I sent him other presents.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Then this sudden burst of morality is attributable to his not defending you?
    Witness.—Yes; and my further knowledge of his character.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Is it not strange that a married woman, as you were, should have entered into a correspondence with him about his indecent familiarities ?
    Witness.—It may be.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You said that it was no source of care or concern to your husband that you had not any children. Why did you then go to the defendant to perform an operation ?
    Witness.—I changed my mind on the subject. Some things had preyed so much on me that I thought if I had a child it might have the effect of changing my thoughts into a different current.
    Mr. IRELAND.—And you went to the very man who had caused the feelings you refer to in order to turn them into a different channel?
    Witness.—I could not go to any other medical man. The very day my husband went to Sydney I went to the defendant to get the operation performed. I did not intend my husband to know of it at all. The defendant refused to perform the operation. I made no allusion to an indecent photograph when I wrote to the defendant's mother and sister, so far as I can recollect. I wrote to the defendant's sister about a month after the receipt of the letter containing the indecent photograph. I sent the following letter to the defendant's sister in Scotland :—
    "Melbourne, March 3, 1868.
    "Miss Blair,—Madame,—In pity I spare your mother. You can say or withhold from her. Your brother, J. Blair, having heard from you I suppose of my saying I would communicate further with you by a pamphlet, has insolently written to my husband for 'fifteen copies.' I do not know whether you are of the same class with him, who can joke about such vileness, but he has an answer he dare not reply to. One reason for having promised you a pamphlet was that I never supposed he would have allowed his name to be handled or used as he knows we have, and still do with impunity; and surely the fact tells its own tale. Having determined in my mind to thwart his aim in making his wife my enemy, so as to silence me among his friends, which was so unnecessary; but as himself is the loser, and society will gradually be benefited and myself less disgraced by our breach, than if still. I was hiding the evil I know of him in my mind. I have no cause but to rejoice, as surely any one must see, especially when I am able to state the following :—Since I last wrote to you I have been informed by a lady, once a friend of your brother's, whose husband knows the gentleman of whom I write this next. He is a commercial traveller, whose wife, it is reported, your brother visits dur-ing her husband's travels. The nature of those visits may be judged by that husband feeling obliged to give up his situation, so as to be near his home to pre-vent such visits in future. The wife has since died, and the gentleman became a neighbour to the friend who told me, he having remarried. In Victoria we have had a general election for the Government and I have been told that at a certain committee meeting, where a friend of Blair's who is well known [Here the letter proceeded to make some statements which we omit]. This person put up for a district, and the popular party, taking into consideration his immorality, thought fit to advertise his private life by skits or bills, and posting them about. The person I allude to has a partner, also a friend of your brother's. This partner being annoyed by seeing those bills put up where he lives, did his best to pull them down, which caused a fracas, and eventually he was hurled into a gutter—so we heard—and was told 'to go home, for he would find enough to attend to there without interfering with preventing the exposure of his partner.' We also heard that previously in a committee meeting the same gentleman was trying to prevent the speaking of an elector, when he was told that if he did not desist, that this man, a neigh-bour of his, would 'talk to him about his domestic trouble,' which arises from his wife being a favourite patient of Blair's, it seems, and it is said that in her husband's absence your brother has spent hours with her, and whether she deserves it or not it is said that she is looked on by some in the village as a mistress of your brother's. For my own part, I can declare that he to my own knowledge has had strange manœuvrings in connexion with her of which her husband now knows, and since your brother told me that she told him secrets she would not tell to her husband, I have reckoned her among those women who have encouraged him in the evil practices in which he tried to initiate me, and, as it was, was so great a curse to me, and from which I saved him from a just punishment, to the risk of all evil imputa-tions, and I scorned her in my heart accord-ingly, and I told your brother so. This day one of the editors of The Argus was giving a list of subscribers to the Colonial Monthly. Dr. Blair was down. My husband exclaimed, 'What is this ? I shall not send that fellow one.' The gentleman replied, 'It is meant for David Blair, the late member of Parliament. What, did you think it was that man with the big house in Collins-street?' My husband said 'Yes.' The editor replied, 'Why I threatened that wretch with seven years on the roads, but he came to me and made all the acknowledgments he could, and so it passed. From what we have heard of him these last 14 months, his conduct is hated in more quarters than one, and I suppose you must know that however much I may have reason for hating him, to concoct and write or speak such things I dare not.
    "C. CLARSON." "Miss Blair."
    Cross-examination continued.—I know Mrs. Friend. I do not produce the original of a letter dated June 28, 1867, purporting to be written by Mr. Friend to my husband. The letter is signed Christopher S. Friend. I know Mr. Friend's signature. He is now dead. The paper produced, signed Christr. S. Friend, was signed by him ; but believe I have seen him write his name in full—Christo-pher. The letter of the 28th June was published in the pamphlet issued by my husband. In the letter Mr. Friend stated that he and a friend of his, whom he had consulted, agreed that from the statements he had heard, there was "no case;" that the law afforded no relief, and that it would be madness for us to thrust ourselves into an action which, so far as expense was con-cerned, would be, ruinous. In the same letter Mr. Friend referred to the defendant as "a fiend in human form." On July 27, 1867, a month after the receipt of Mr. Friend's letter, I wrote to Mrs. Friend. I then told her that my husband told me I had to thank the untruthful and dishonourable interference of a lady—to whom at his request I had told the main facts of the story—for Mr. Friend's unjust condemnation of me. I did not see Mr. Friend's letter of June 28. I attribute the change in his views to the fact that this lady put a vile construction upon what I had told her had been the effect on me of the defendant's aggressions, and that she had communicated this to Mr. Friend, who had thus acquired a false impression. I sent the following letter to Mrs. Friend:—
    "Feb. 27, 1867.
    4 Wellington-terrace, East Melbourne.
    "Dear Mrs. Friend,—Mr. Clarson tells me that your judgment has gone out against me on your reading my case as written, and that in your opinion I may say what I please, I am not morally innocent. For your own sake, as well as those near and dear to you, may you be spared my just judgment in any similar case on their behalf. Your girls are born to you, but you know not how much the same God may permit them to be tried. Even the opinion of him who has been permitted to be so great a curse to me and mine, has often been expressed to me as to my being a very virtuous woman— as having virtue worthy of his mother or wife. Not that I judge myself on such opinion, for I know who has to do with the heart, and He knows wherein I have done wrong. But it was not in my admiration of a character I thought resembled my husband's, who I have over felt to be at the pinnacle of human virtue, or for improving a friendship with such an one, for my husband's sake as well as my own, for I never wished for it but for him to share it with me at all times ; for, after a length of three years' silent admiration, enhanced by the personal proofs of his delicate and sympa-thising conduct during my times of sickness, with the gratitude I felt for his skill in my business. For these things I stand not guilty before God, or for after so long an acquaintance having opportunities, through a mere accident, of accepting more direct friendship, and then, after further proof of his conduct, that I should lay before him, as the man of honour I thought him, how much I had ever thought of him, so that he might never mistake any warmth of attachment for wrong feeling. For these things neither would the angels in Heaven accuse me of evil, or their God. Neither did that man misjudge me, for he could not ; for in the same letter did I do honour to my husband, by expressing my great appreciation of his virtue ; therefore could he not, as that evil-construing Mrs. S—— said, 'take it into his brain that I wanted it for evil purposes.' May God forgive her, for I won't.
    "You, I hear, have said that you knew I was very fond of him. I was greatly attached, neither did I hide I was so even from my husband, because it was of a nature that did not interfere with my relative position with him, in my mind till several years after, or after indeed his third aggression, though upon the first appearance of his evil propensi-ties he interfered with my happiness ; but his third aggression being of a grosser order, that evil did make my nature shrink and revolt from nature herself, and I did hate not my husband, but the being a wife, and at times could I but have hid myself from both them without wronging either, how willingly would I, God knows . . . . . Had that attachment been of an evil nature, how could I have found the pleasure I always did of taking every opportunity to introduce Mr. Blair to my friends of both sexes, and how could I ever have loved to accept the friendship of her who is now his wife, myself being the means of her being so, even, however, from first to almost the last endeavouring to bring them together in spite of all he had said against her as an imprudent woman years ago, and which I never once named to her till there could be no doubt left in my mind? That slight obligation, the use of his carriage when you were ill here, for when quarrelling with me he would be mean enough to trace it to me.
    "I am glad also that my determination has been fulfilled, in that he has been forced to speak of your daughters as I think they merit, viz., the well-educated daughters of a gentle-man, and not mere bush girls, not worthy of a seat in a carriage, though I begged hard for him to show such kindness to them instead of fulfilling his many broken promises to me which I never cared to accept alone ; but I am avenged of all that in your kindness to him at Burnham Lodge. It was Mr. C.'s desire that I should not write to any one again at Geelong; but I could not say farewell to you all in my mind without speaking out of my heart. As to our future I may say nothing. I shall not think of leaving Melbourne of all things for I am ready and willing to face that friend before few or many, and my husband has promised me that if he has to proclaim his character himself in the streets, he shall not escape unless I desire it, and for myself I would rather be looked upon as an actual adultress than that his treachery should not be known ; and this is all have to say, except that I think it right to enclose the following copy, sent, as you see ; and I cannot think that this letter was shown to Mr. Friend on his visit there previous to his last seeing Mr. Clarson, or no matter how they might have presumed to interfere with me. Surely, Mr. F. would not have encouraged anything so dishonour-able as their thus opposing Mr. C. Surely he was capable of taking the consequences of what he deemed a proper withholding."
    Cross-examination continued.—I don't think I saw Mr. Friend's letter. I took my observation about unjust condemnation from Mrs. Friend's remarks. I heard that Mr. Friend had condemned me. He was an elderly gentleman, and a man of business. I can't say whether he used to sign his letters uniformly. I have seen some signed "yours affectionately."
    Mr. IRELAND.—That seems to have been your own practice.
    The cross examination was then directed to the photographs. Neither of the two alleged libellous photographs had as yet been put in evidence, and Mr. Ireland was therefore obliged to confine his questions to the one which was put in.
    Witness.—This photograph was taken on a vacant piece of ground at Wellington-parade. My dress was coloured pink, and it turned out white in the photograph. I had the one produced coloured pink as you now see it. I had only two or three copies taken. I never saw the indelicate photograph till after the action by Mr. Blair was stopped. I was then putting aside the law papers connected with the case, and looking over them I saw this photograph and looked at it.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You have made reference to God, you have talked of virtue, and de-nounced evil, and yet all these long years, till Mr. Blair was going to be married, you suppressed the knowledge that he took these liberties with you ?
    Witness.—That is the wrong that l have done. Mr. IRELAND.—And you persisted in going to his house from 1863 to 1867 ?
    Witness.—Yes ; I was still his patient.
    Mr. IRELAND.—And you were willing to do duty as his housekeeper ?
    Witness.—I merely meant a friendly act as God is my witness.
    MR. IRELAND.—You were willing to go as housekeeper to a man who had three times behaved most indecently to you.
    Witness.—Not as housekeeper—oh no, no, no; but to live with my husband.
    Mr. IRELAND.—You talk about being "differently circumstanced ;" that means not married.
    Witness.—No ; it was this. Mr. Clarson had spoken to me on the subject of our living with Mr. Blair, in consequence of his having removed to a large house in Collins-street, and we could have a portion of it.
    Mr. IRELAND.—Then you did not mean if Mr. Clarson was out of the way.
    Witness.—No; I had no such idea.
    Mr. IRELAND.—That will do, madam.
    Re-examined by Mr. DUNNE.—I understood that Mr. Clarson and Mr. Blair had spoken about our having a portion of his house. In the letter alluded to the words "remain as you are," means while he remained unmarried —till he got a wife. We were then living at Evans place, and had a house of our own ; but if proper arrangements were made we might have gone to live with Mr. Blair.
    Mr. DUNNE.—In reference to Mr. Friend's letter, was it not the fact that in the interval between his letter to your husband and yours to his wife, Mr. Friend had come to Melbourne, and stopped with a certain lady ?
    Witness.—He did, and she must have given him information against me. It was in con-sequence of that I wrote the letter. Mr. Blair used to keep all the presents I sent to him. They were mostly taken to him by my hus-band. Blair never knew except once but that my husband knew of all. Blair never refused to take my presents. He only spoke of the trouble to me. After January, 1867, Mr. Blair never met me but he insulted me. On one occasion when I was in a car on the Richmond road, the day after he was admitted to the Royal Society, he met in his buggy. As he passed he laughed at me, and shook his whip thus. (The witness, to the great amuse-ment of the Court. energetically gave an illustration of the defendant's manner.) On another occasion I was going in a car to Mr. Taylor's chapel. Passed Mr. Blair with two ladies in Collins-street, one his wife; he put up his umbrella, laughed, and pointed at me so (giving another illustration). He attended the same place of worship as I did that day. (Laughter.) On another occasion, when I was on the back of a car, he and his wife passed ; he took off his hat, and bowed himself almost to the ground, so (illustrating it). Mrs. Blair used to behave in almost the manner except that she did not take off her hat and use the whip. Once when passing Little Bourke-street I came suddenly on Miss Hunter, who had a young lady with her. As she passed me, she touched the lady and said, "Pretty, is she-not?" (Laughter.) She had no right to make any such remark. Mr. Blair's letter of December 28, 1865, for the first time mentions marriage.
    At this stage, at the earnest request of the counsel, the further hearing of the case was adjourned till next day.25
  • 9 Mar 1872, THE GREAT SCANDAL CASE. CLARSON v. BLAIR.
    FOURTH DAY — Saturday, 2nd March. This case was continued on Saturday in the Supreme Court before Mr. Justice Barry and a special jury of twelve. The direct examination of the defendant, John Blair, was resumed. He said :— I do not recollect receiving a letter from Mrs. Clarson telling me of what she had suffered through the past, but that my secret would die with her. As I said before, I destroyed a great many of her letters without reading them. The conversation she alluded to with reference to my carrying my in-struments with me I never had with her, and I never made the reply she said I did. I remember on one occasion, when I visited her professionally, she asked me if I had come to perform the opera-tion, so that she might have children. I put the ques-tion off as well as I could, the same as I always did when she talked to me on the subject. Our friendly intercourse continued until November, 1866, but previous to that she was getting more troublesome in her calls, and was continually making arrangements for my going out on shoot ing excursions with her husband. Mr. Clarson used to borrow money from me for a few days when he was short, to carry on his business with. He always used to pay it back, but one day I refused to let him have any more, thinking by this means to get rid of Mrs. Clarson's visits, which were getting too frequent and annoying. She was in the habit, when I was out, of calling at my house, going upstairs and playing the piano. She wanted to send me a piano, but I refused, and said she would like to oome to live at my house. I looked upon the proposition as pre posterous. I could not shake her off in a quiet gentlemanly manner. I always like to be kind to excitable people. She once sent me a massive silver cigar-case that was too heavy to carry in the pocket. My name and crest was engraved upon it. I said to her, "You must give up snding me these presents," and in a letter to me she asked, " Why deprive me of the only pleasure of my life ?" I was at a loss how to throw her off in a gentle way. I told her how wrong it was of her to do this without her husband's know ledge, and that I knew he could not afford it. I told her once I would not receive her presents any longer, and she got into one of her excitable moods, and it was wishing to calm a woman of her disposition that I wrote the letter to her dated 28th December, 1865, in which I told her I thought of getting married. I told her this wishing to divert her thoughts. One day when I was out she decorated my bed in a most peculiar manner. The last time I saw her in a friendly way was in January, 1867. I had been in the country, and on returning home I found two letters from her, and a third little note with "come immediately" on it. I went to her place, and she entered the room in a very excited state, saying, "Why did you not come before? Is this the way you treat your patients?" I said, Madam, provide yourself with another medical man," and left the house. I never insulted her, as she says I did. I was subjected to a species of torture by her. She sent shameful letters to my patients, and they complained to me of it. She sent letters by hundreds to my patients. I got married in April, 1867, and my wife, who had previously been Miss Hunter, got a most dis graceful letter from Mrs. Clarson. If I met Mrs. Clarson in the street she would stare at me with a grin of satisfaction, and if I went to a ball with my wife she would be sure in some way to get an in troduction. She used to ring at my bell, and throw letters into the hall. It is not true that I was blackballed by the Royal Society ; I was unanimously elected. What she construes into my shaking my whip at her was the simple act pf politeness of raising my whip to my hat. I remember pointing at her once, but it was not in an insulting way. I was going to chapel with my wife and another lady, to whom I merely pointed out Mrs. Clarson as the person who wrote the letters. I remember being at the Governor's hall. Mrs. Clarson there planted herself before my wife and myself, and kissed. I remember her sending a letter to the subscribers of the Alfred Hospital. I remember picking up a portrait of Mrs. Clarson at Mrs. Wimble's. I got one copied. I forwarded the copy to Mr. Clarson, with some extracts of Mrs. Clarson's pasted on it, and a note (produced). The word "copied" on it is in my handwriting. The envelope produced is not the one in which I sent it, and the writing on it is not mine. My wife was present when I wrote the note, and when I put the photograph in the envelope I gave it to my groom to post. I also showed her the pieces I tore off Mrs. Clar son's letter. The photograph is not in the same condition as when I sent it. It has been muti lated in a most filthy manner. The reason I sent the photograph to Mr. Clarson with pieces cut from his wife's letters was to let him know what a foolish woman she was. I did not send this medical picture to Mrs. Clarson. The writing on the picture, " Mrs. Clarson as seen by Dr. B.," is not mine. The writing on the envelope is not mine. I never on any occasion sent an indecent picture to either Mr. or Mrs. Clarson, neither did I know of anyone else sending any.
    Cross-examined by Mr. Billing : I got the por trait I picked up at Mrs. Wimble's copied because I wanted to keep the original. I wanted to keep the original, because my friends kept asking me what was all the commotion about this woman, and when they chaffed me I showed them the likeness, and said " This is the woman." I only got one copy made, as that was to send to Mr. Clarson, so that he should control her foolish actions. I did not get the envelope addressed by anybody else. I did not disguise my hand writing. I had no reason to do so. I do not know the handwriting of the superscription on this envelope. The writing on the other is not mine either. I don't know whose it is. I swear that, I never saw it before until I saw it on the table in this court. I certainly did once put my hand underneath Mrs. Clarson's clothes, but it was not with any indecent intention. She had a fainting fit, and was much worse than usual, and thinking it might hare been caused by tight-lacing, because I felt that her waist was compressed, I put my hands under her clothes to ascertain. Q. : Did you think it a decent thing to do A. : There was nothing indecent in it under the circumstances. She appeared tightly drawn in, and had difficulty in breathing. But could you not have ascertained whether she was tight-laced in any other way ? A: No, not under the circumstances. It would have taken too long a time to unhook her dress. Q.: Does every medical man put his hand under a patient's clothes in the manner you did to see whether she be tightly laced ? A. : Yes, in such an emergency. Q : But this was not an emergency, you know. A. : It would have been one had she died in my room. It is a frequent thing for people to die in such fits, and Mrs. Clarson was on this occasion worse than usual, and it was my duty to take prompt measures. I swear I did not press her to my breast, and she had no occasion to say "don't" or push away my hand. She did not do either. I did not say " I want to excite you, so that you won t go off again." It is just by the merest chance that l kept the letters I have produced in this case. They were not kept for any purpose. I have destroyed and thrown into the waste-paper basket many of a more poetical character. I never read any letter from her complaining of what she calls my aggressions. Q.: Did you, as a medical man, think it right never to acquaint Mr. Clarson with your receiving these letters ? A. : Yes. I will explain that. A medical man is not in the position to make strife between man and wife. If he has got a hysterical patient his object is to relieve her as much as possible. I did not draw her between my knees on the occasion of my examining her breast. She did not then say to me that her husband's goodness inclined her to tell him all. I think I only met Miss Hunter once at the Clarsons. She had an antipathy to go to the place. I have read the pamphlet called "Truth, not Libel" I did not bring an action against Mr. Clarson on reading that. To Mr. Higinbotham : I swear Mrs. Clarson never remonstrated with me for what she calls my agressions. To a juryman : I was twenty-six or twenty-seven years old when I first commenced to attend Mrs. Clarson.
    Elizabeth Layers deposed that she was Dr. Blair's housekeeper from 1861 to 1864, and that during that period Mrs. Clarson used frequently to come to the house, sometimes twice a day, and bring flowers and fruits with her, and that if Dr. Blair was not in she would either wait or write a note to him ; also that she fainted occasionally while she was there.
    Mary Taylor said : I was in the employ of Dr. Blair, as housemaid, for about twelve months after he entered the house in Collins street. Mrs. Clarson frequently came there, and the doctor often told me to say he was out to her when he would be in. Sometimes when he was out she would go all through the house, and into his bed room, and wash her hands, and play the piano in the drawing room. I remember one day in March, 1865, she came in while the doctor was out, and went up into his bedroom and decorated his bed with blue crape curtains, blue tassels, and bows. She also decorated the dressing-table and looking-glass with flowers and ribbons of all colours. I called up my sister, who was the housekeeper, because I thought the woman was cracked.
    Mrs. Blair was next called. She was deeply affected, and for some time was unable to give her evidence. As soon as she had recovered a little she said : — My name is Mary Blair. I am the wife of Dr. Blair, the defendant. I have known him since I was five years old. I met him at the house of the Carsons not more than twice or three times. In December, 1867, I saw Dr. Blair write the letter produced, and place it in an envelope, with a photograph of Mrs. Clarson. The photograph was not sent from our house in the condition it is now. I saw him give it to the groom to post. While my husband was writing the note I had the photograph in my hand. It was not pos sible for it to be in its present state without my seeing it. I have known Mrs. Clarson slightly for seven or eight years. I remember the Go vernor's ball. The first time I observed her in the room she was following me about. I tried to get away from her as far as l could. I managed to keep out of her way until we got to the supper-table, when she made her way up and eat opposite to my husband and I. She commenced at once to make herself very disagreeable by making faces at me, and Mr. Clarson shook his hand across the table at my husband, and said something about making known his conduct. I told the doctor to take no notice of them, and Mrs. Clarson made a hissing noise. I then patted my husband on the shoulder. I did not do it out of any malicious feeling to Mrs. Clarson. I did say to another lady once, when we met Mrs. Clarson in the street, " Isn't she a beauty ?" One day, I believe I had received an invitation to spend the day with Mrs. Clarson. I did not go, but went for a drive with the doctor. On our return we called at Mrs. Clarson's house. She was not in, and we then went on to the doctor's place, as he wanted to call in to make some inquiries before he drove me home. When he opened the door he said, "Here's Mrs. Clar son" and he asked me to come in. I went in, and Mrs. Claraon was in the surgery. Directly she saw me she said, "You never answered my note ; it was very unladylike of you." She spoke very excitedly, and I was angry with her. I said, " Well it may be, but I do not intend to answer any of your letters, and if you think I am going to stand your nonsense you are mistaken." The doctor said he hoped there would be no quarrel ; and I said, " No." Mrs. Clarson then went away, and the doctor drove me home. There is no truth in the statement made by Mrs. Clarson that I once introduced myself into the house of Dr. Blair with a latch-key, and spent the evening with him. It is as false as her other statements. she tries at any place of public amusement to get as near me as possible, and that hurts my feelings after all the persecution my husband and I have undergone at her hands. I received a number of letters from her, but never would read them, or allow her to interfere with my peace of mind or my affection for my husband, so that I can scarcely say what was in her letters. To Mr. Billing : I am sure I did not do any thing at the Governor's Ball to cause Mrs. Clarson to do what she did. I saw my husband put the photograph of Mrs. Claraon into the envelope. It was not then in the same disgraceful state at is now. It was a simple copy of the carte he got at Mrs. Wimble's. I had the photograph in my hands before he enclosed it. I am sure it was not torn in any way. I did not see the word "copied" on it. I see it now, and think it is my husband's writing. I left the room for a minute or so while he was writing the note, but it was impossible for the photograph to have been altered to its present state without my knowing it, as I saw him put it in the envelope. Both my husband and myself would scorn to do such a disgraceful thing. The envelope produced is not the same. The writing is not my husband's. This closed the evidence for the defence, and the Court then adjourned until Monday.
    FIFTH DAY—Monday, 4th March. On the fifth day the court was occupied with Mr. Ireland's address to the jury for the defence, and Mr. Billing's rejoinder. His Honour the Judge then summed up, and the jury having retired, returned into court after an absence of an hour and a quarter with a verdict for the defendant on all the counts of the declaration. There was some applause by the public, and Dr. Blair was surrounded by his friends, who congratulated him upon the result of the trial.26
  • 12 Nov 1887, BEACONSFIELD, A MOUNTAIN HOME, With 100 ACRES of LAND. ADMINISTRATORS' SALE.
    JOHN BUCHAN and Co are instructed by the Perpetual Executors and Trustees Association of Australia Limited, administrators of the estate of the late Dr. John Blair, to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION, at their rooms, 87 Queen street, on Tuesday, November 22, at noon.
    Substantially built eight-roomed wooden house, coachhouse, stables, and other necessary outbuildings, good orchard, fruit trees of all sorts just coming into bearing.
    The property is well watered with natural creeks. Plantation round boundaries of over 1000 English and other trees.
    The property is situated on the Telegraph road, about 20 minutes walk from Beaconsfield house Hotel.
    The promised railway to Gembrook as surveyed passes through the land, and a railway station will be close to the house.
    "The Vagabond" says of BEACONSFIELD,
    "It is the most beautiful summer resort I know of in Australia."27
  • 6 Dec 1887, BEACONSFIELD. Furnished HOUSE, known as Walnut Grove, containing eight rooms, coach. house, stables, &c., about three miles from Beaconsfield railway: well situated, sheltered, and lovely views from the property. Apply Manager Perpetual Executors and Trustees Association of Australia Limited, 55 Queen Street, Melbourne.28
  • 14 Dec 1887, BEACONSFIELD. FURNISHED HOUSE. Known as Walnut-grove, Containing eight rooms, coachhouse, stables, &c., About 3 miles from Beaconsfield railway. Well situated, sheltered,
    And Lovely views from the property.
    Apply MANAGER PERPETUAL EXECUTORS and TRUSTEES ASSOCIATION of AUSTRALIA LIMITED, 66 Queen-street, Melbourne.29
  • 13 Nov 1889, THE Governor in Council has directed that the buildings and premises belonging to Mrs. M. H. Blair, situated at Beaconsfield, and known as "Walnut Grove," shall be an Asylum for Inebriates, to be used for the care and treatment of female patients only. See G.G., 8th November, 1889, p. 3834.30
  • 20 Mar 1897, BEACONSFIELD UPPER, March 15.
    The company that has leased Blair's property have commenced operations at last. The men who obtained the contract for sinking the shaft have begun. I believe this shaft has to be sunk to a depth of seventy feet, when they will commence to drive onu the lead. The operations of this company will be watched with interest.31
  • 28 Aug 1897, Mining news is rather scarce at present. In Walker's and The Haunted Gullies a few men are still at work and manage to eke out a livelihood. The company in Blair's property have been busy lately fixing up poppet heads and getting the winding engine into position. They expect to start driving shortly.32
  • 15 Mar 1930, MRS. BLAIR'S ABORIGINE
    Mr. L. A. Vail (South Yarra) writes: In his interesting article in the Camera Supplement on February 22, Mr. H. E. Brennan is incorrect when he suggests that Lani, Mrs. Blair's aborigine boy, was dressed in an Eton "uniform," and would no doubt become a butler. In the period which Mr. Brennan describes Lani would be attired in an Eton suit which was the gala dress of the period for all public and grammar school boys. Lani was never destined for domestic service. He was educated at All Saints' Grammar School, St Kilda, and I first met him there about 1892. He would have been born about 1879. This does not agree with the tomb stone inscription, but if the two people standing in the picture are Dr. and Mrs. Blair, then the little aborigine is Lani, for, as far as is known, this lad was the only aborigine adopted by them.
    Although the boy was not by any means energetic, he entered into his work and games with as much zest as most scholars. At cricket and football he adopted an air of listlessness, which quickly changed to that of speed and alertness when called upon to do his part. He was never robust - rather the reverse - and was usually seen outside of school horns with his bicycle. He started "hot favourite" for an old boys' bicycle race on the St. Kilda Cricket-ground. The trophy for this event is dated December, 1898. His fellow competitors had not seen him for about two years, and it was noticed that he was, if possible, thinner than ever.
    Mr. W. Murray McLean (West Wyalong) writes:-I was Lani Blair's greatest friend. He was found, I believe, at a deserted camp of aborigines in North Queensland. - Mrs. Blair had told friends of hers in that locality that she would like a "boy" for a butler, but Lani was sent to her as a child. Mrs. Blair adopted him and gave him the name of Lani Mulgrave Blair. At this time Mrs. Blair lived in Collins street, but shortly afterward she lived very near to St. Ives private hospital, East Melbourne, which was at that time my father's residence. Lani and I attended kindergarten together and he was far above the average, his work being particularly neat and his writing excellent. Mrs. Blair later moved to St. Kilda, and Lani attended All Saints' Grammar School, where he had a splendid record. On leaving that school he was employed by a Melbourne architect. I think this record proves that he suceeeded both as a scholar and an athlete. He was a cadet, and he gained a medal as ? shot, and was a good runner, ? and cyclist.
    Mr. Brennan mentions that Lani appeared in the old picture in ? I well remember that, and he remembered it.33
  • 22 Mar 1930, Mrs. Blair's Aborigine. Some More Memoirs
    Mr Sydney H. Wilson (Portsea. writes: -I was very much interested in learning about Lani Mulgrave, Mrs Blair's aborigine boy, who was mentioned by Mr H P Brennan in the Camera Supplement on February 22 as appearing in the old picture 'When Trident Won the Derby'. I well remember him from his childhood. He usually made weekend trips to Sorrento with Mrs Blair to Dr Blair's sanitorium Balgowie. Lani was usually dressed in a sailor suit. After he had completed his studies at All Saints Grammar School Mrs Blair articled him to the profession of an architect under my care. He showed considerable skill in drawing and took a great interest in his work. After he had served two years as a pupil, one Saturday afternoon he ventured after yabbies in Albert Park lake, with the result that he caught a chill and succumbed to pneumonia.
    Mr. L. Herz (Mordialloc) writes:- Lani was sent from Queensland by the late Dr. Blair, and, after about three months, was legally adopted by Mrs. Blair. Lani first went to Miss Violet Neild's kindergarten in George Street, East Melbourne. He became then one of my best friends, and was so until his death. The photograph mentioned by Mr. H. P. Brennan is undoubtedly that of Lani, as I drove to that Derby meeting with Dr. and Mrs. Blair and Lani in a drag and four. " Lani was a splendid cricketer, and he first played for the Sunbeams cricket team. East Melbourne, of which club the late Sir William Clarke was president. - Lani died at St. Kilda at the age of 18 years, and he was buried at St. Kilda.
    Miss M. T. James (Surrey Hills) writes: Mrs. Blair was in search of a boy for domestic work. She asked a friend staying at her house when he went to Queensland to send her a young aborigine. She was eventually told to meet a certain boat with the boy on board. When the vessel arrived and the cargo was being put ashore, she asked the captain where was the boy. To her surprise a bag was brought, pulled up at the top, and tied with rope, from which peeped a tiny black head with large, rolling eyes. The child had not been taken out of the bag from the time the boat left Queensland. Mrs. Blair hurried into a cab, and home to Collins street, where she cut the bag off and gave him a warm bath. He was only a baby, and she decided to adopt him. He was christened, and I had some of the cake. He was named Lani Mulgrave Blair. Mulgrave was the name of the river where his tribe lived, and where he was born. Mrs. Blair had him educated, and he became a remarkable French scholar and a clever dancer. He was indeed an engaging and attractive personality, and I always enjoyed his visits when he and his adopted mother came to stay with me at Blairgowrie.34
  • 5 Apr 1930, MRS. BLAIR'S ABORIGINE. AN EXPERIMENT IN ETHNOLOGY
    Mr. W. A. Larkins (Fitzroy) writes:- "My father and Dr. Blair were great friends, and every week-end they travelled together to Sorrento in the late '70's. I was nearly always there, and frequently I listened to discussions of Dr. Blair's theory that, given equal chances, the aboriginal brain would compare favourably with the 'white' brain. It was to test his theory that Dr. Blair arranged with a captain of one of the inter-colonial steamers to obtain a Queensland native for him. The first child died on the voyage down. A second attempt resulted in Lani being landed safely, but the dear old doctor did not live to complete his experiment."
    Miss L. T. James (North Fitzroy) writes:-"The late Dr. John Blair made a study of Australian aborigines, and intended that an infant aborigine trained and educated from birth would be equal to any British subject or scholar. Lani was quite a costly specimen before Mrs. Blair met him in the old sack with a pannikin tied to it with a hayband.
    "Lani came from his Queensland home to prove Dr. Blair's theory, but Mrs. Blair did not want a black boy, or any boy. The Blairs had had a staff of Indian servants, as was the custom then among people who lived in good style and could afford the luxury. One of them - the butler - remained a good and faithful servant until he died at Sorrento, where he lies buried. His name was Lani. ' When Mrs. Blair saw the sad little black baby a maternal instinct was aroused, and she was a mother to him, and he a loving son. She said, "I will call him Lani", as soon as he was dressed in conventional infant clothes. He had two playmates - Rose and Lily Fisher, the twin daughters of Dr. and Mrs. Fisher, of Collins street. They were in the next house, and they assisted greatly in Lani's happiness and culture. With their nurses they played in the gardens, always guarded by Donald Dinnie, Lani's Scotch terrier. Dr. Blair died while Lani was quite young, and Mrs. Blair then lived much more at Sorrento in Rinneel, her seaside home, near the beach and viillage, which none of your correspondents has mentioned. It was a later purchase than Blairgowrie, three miles distant. Lani's mother was shot dead, and he was taken from her breast while her body was yet warm. Dr. Blair told me this, but I do not know in which circumstances the shot was fired. The Mulgrave River tribe were murderers at one time, I was told, and there were raids upon them after trouble."35

Citations

  1. [S1] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Pioneer Index Victoria 1836-1888.
  2. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), B 076 003.
  3. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 6 May 1867, p1.
  4. [S36] Inward & outward passenger lists to and from Victoria. Series: VPRS 14; 7666; 7667; 7786); PROV (Public Records Office Victoria).
  5. [S66] Berwick Shire Rates, 1870-1965.
  6. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1803-447 - The undivided half part in the property was transferred to Mary BLAIR on 6 Apr 1887 - registered on title 31 Oct 1890.
  7. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1803-445 - Mary Hunter Blair of Collins Street Melbourne Widow is registered as proprietor of the within described land as executrix to whom probate of the will of John Blair (who died on the 9th March 1887) was .. on the 6th April 1887.
  8. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1803-445 - William McCrea Hick of William Street Melbourne Merchant - C/T 2201-160.
  9. [S81] Land Records, Parish Maps & Council Rate Books. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 5357/P0000/1314     
    1165/40.4. MARY HUNTER BLAIR. ARCHIBALD HUNTER. PAKENHAM 114. 19--1--3. 1877 - 1889.
  10. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2170-929 - Mary Hunter Blair of Melbourne.
  11. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2170-929 - William McCrea Hick of William Street Melbourne Merchant.
  12. [S34] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 267/ P7 unit 865, item 1890/1002.
  13. [S34] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 267/ P7 unit 921, item 1890/6013.
  14. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 1803-447 - Robert Elwall Jacomb to Mary Hunter Blair - C/T 2305-950
    Mary Hunter Blair of Collins Street Melbourne Widow is registered as the proprietor of the balance of the within described land as executrix to whom probate of the will of John Blair who died on the 9th March 1887 was granted on the 6th April 1887 - Dated 31 Oct 1890.
  15. [S185] Property Titles. ; PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), C/T 2305-950 - Albert Terry - not discharged.
  16. [S34] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 8350/ P2 unit 170, item 90560.
  17. [S34] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 8350/ P2 unit 219, item 97476.
  18. [S34] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 267/ P7 unit 1103, item 1893/3656.
  19. [S34] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), Kew Admissions to 1919.
  20. [S5] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Death Index Victoria 1921-1985.
  21. [S24] PROV (Public Records Office Victoria), VPRS 24/P0000 unit 1010, item 1921/771
    Female, Blair, Mary Hunter, Colitis, Kew Asylum, 1921/771, 05 Aug 1921,.
  22. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 29 Aug 1921, p1.
  23. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Parish: Uphall; ED: 1; Page: 23; Line: 1390; Year: 1841."
  24. [S83] Online index to the UK census "Parish: Boness; ED: 2; Page: 13; Line: 7; Roll: CSSCT1851_173; Year: 1851."
  25. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 1 Mar 1872, p6.
  26. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Saturday 9 Mar 1872, p 12.
  27. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 12 Nov 1887, p16.
  28. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 6 Dec 1887, p12.
  29. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 14 Dec 1887, p10.
  30. [S14] Newspaper - Victoria Police Gazette, 13 Nov 1889, p370.
  31. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Sat 20 Mar 1897, p29.
  32. [S14] Newspaper - Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Sat 28 Aug 1897, p29.
  33. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 15 Mar 1930, p.2S.
  34. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 22 Mar 1930, p.10S.
  35. [S11] Newspaper - Argus 5 Apr 1930, p.10S.
  36. [S2] Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages Federation Index Victoria 1889-1901.
Last Edited25 Jul 2019
 

NOTE

Many family sections show only the children who were associated with Upper Beaconsfield.